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Crochet vs Knitting

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I'm just curious about this statement. I realize that it's your opinion and, of course, you're entitled to it. But, I'm just wondering if your knowledge of Tunisian crochet is limited to only older patterns. Here are some of mine that I've done in the past. I can understand if someone simply doesn't enjoy doing Tunisian crochet. But, I really wouldn't understand if you say that it is hideous once you see these. If you do, that's fine, of course. But, I wanted to share with you since there has been so much done with Tunisian in the last 10 years.

 

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Kim, I was waiting for you to say something about your gorgeous Tunisian pieces! You (and a few other designers I guess, but IMHO you've done the most in terms of artistry) have really elevated the art in recent years.

 

I agree about the difference between American and European knitting. As I'm European I never learned the American way, but it surely looks tedious. The European way is faster and doesn't include as many movements. The movements are smaller too (easier on your muscles).

 

I knit "European", but I actually would like to learn to knit "American" so that I can do both at the same time when doing Fair Isle. You hold one color in your left hand and the other in your right, and it supposedly goes much quicker. How one achieves consistent gauge doing that boggles my mind.

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Those are absolutely gorgeous.....I knew tunisian has changed and that there are more stitches and patterns available for some very nice finished items but my goodness....I'm stunned. Are there instructions for these :D?

 

I think it also depends on the types of yarn used for the different items. Especially since Tunisian gives a thicker and less stretchy stitch, using a softer/thinner yarn should provide you with a nice finished product.

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I only crochet, I haven't ever tried to knit...although I would love to know how because I see some great patterns that I'd love to try!

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Here are some of mine that I've done in the past.

Kim they're so beautiful.

Somehow I missed that part of her post.

I made my husband a pillow in tunsian and it is so soft and and cool looking. I keep thinking I'm going to do a blanket it it. All I did was plain stitch, nothing like yours.

:)

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I can both knit and crochet.I enjoy Aran knitting,but my favourite is thread crochet.

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Goddess of Tunisian crochet, huh? I like that! :hug

 

Yes, these afghans were published, so instructions are available. They're just a bit hard to find right now because they are out of print. Here is a list of the four Tunisian afghan books I did through Annie's Attic:

 

Tunisian Sampler Afghan

 

Afghan Stitch Afghans

 

Tunisian Baby Afghans (the first and third afghans in the photos are from this one)

 

Tunisian Baby Blankets (the second afghan is available in this one)

 

I see all of these books on eBay and most of them are on the Australia Crochet site as well.

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I only crochet. I cannot knit. I have tried to learn. A friend, many years ago, who knew how to knit, was helping me along, but I could not get the hang of manipulating the yarn so that it had a loose feel to it. Mine was too tight and not pretty.

I gave up because I don't have time to spend on something that is a struggle for me.

I can crochet, and I'm good at crocheting.

I also love to sew and tolepaint, do woodcrafts and I'm good at those skills. However, I cannot knit, and I have no desire to learn now, due to my previous experience with it.

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I have tried to teach myself to knit because I want to make a sweater. I just can not get it. I feel so clumsy with two needles. Maybe if someone could show me or I took a class I might be able to figure it out....

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At the risk of getting crochet hooks thrown at me, I have to admit that I absolutely *love* me some knitted ribbing. Love, love, love it! I could see myself making an entire sweater in ribbing just because I love it so much. But, if I'm designing a crocheted sweater, I will always put a crocheted ribbing on it. (Except for one time when it was acceptable and that sweater hasn't been published yet.) If I use a crocheted ribbing, I'm usually forced to put a FPdc/BPdc ribbing since most of my styles are worked vertically. This type of ribbing eats yarn like crazy and is rather heavy. So, I have to design the body of the sweater accordingly so that it will hold up the ribbing.

 

When I knit, I knit continental style. My daughter, however, knits by "throwing". I really dislike throwing. It seems to take a long time. But, continental bothers me not at all. When I do the cast on for her and get her started, I do the first row in "throwing" and wow! it takes me a long, long time.

 

For anyone who tried to teach themselves to knit and didn't get it, I didn't get it my first time either. I put it down for years. Then, one day, I tried again and it just clicked. It was after I learned Tunisian crochet, to be honest. It was something about the Tunisian and designing all those afghans that made me more intuitive about knitting, I think.

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Amusing? That may be how you feel but I think it's a bit rude to call people amusing (definition laughable or comical)... because they are crocheting something that in your personal opinion should be knitted. If you like knit ribbing that's good but not everyone can knit or even wants to. Yes it's your opinion & you have a right to it but I still think it's better to be nice than to share our thoughts if it isn't nice.

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Wow those Tunisian blankets are beautiful! I can't do tunisian yet although I have tried... maybe one day.

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Kim, I was waiting for you to say something about your gorgeous Tunisian pieces! You (and a few other designers I guess, but IMHO you've done the most in terms of artistry) have really elevated the art in recent years.

 

Thank you! Such a lovely thing to say! :c9

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I learned to knit first but could never understand and read patterns, and somewhere back when crochet was fashion, I taught myself crochet. I only crocheted for years till I figured out my little knitting problem and have enjoyed both since. I've always loved tunisian crochet and really love the explosion of stuff out there now.

 

As to better or worse? I find the techniques of both just as satisfying and the products of both just as nice. The crocheted socks I have done are wonderful, just as are the knitted ones. Sometimes, I prefer to wear the crocheted ones. The many layers of yarn in crochet stitches have given me my favourite pair of camping socks. And I've made some great crocheted sweaters and am working on some very rewarding knitted lace.

 

Its not about the technique I use, my fascination has always been that here is some string, and here is a tool of some sort, and I can make things. I think its just that I have a burning need to play with strings.

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It should be noted that when crochet was fashion was about 1968-1972.

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Kim, those are really pretty. The 2 that are shown on the sofa have such a nice sheen to them and look so smooth and comfortable.

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I do not understand some of the extreme reactions to the original post. Obviously it is one person's opinion. The art of crocheting has not been attacked and does not need to be defended.

 

Knitted cables and ribbing are different than crocheted cables and ribbing. I like both, but to me they are not the same. There are some great crocheted cables; the Stone Path hat designed by Lisa Naskrent is one example. I've been happy with the cabled items I have crocheted. I like cables so much that I re-learned to knit so I can have those cables too.

 

Personally, I do not understand the appeal of either crocheted OR knitted socks. I look at knitted doilies and even shawls and think how much simpler crochet would be for the same (or to me, prettier) effect. Granny squares will always be one of my favorite things to crochet; I just love making them and the way they look joined together. I don't get upset when crocheters post that they hate granny squares. It's just opinions, and no one is telling me what I can or can't do.

 

Like others have said, it's all yarn, and it's all good!:yarn:yarn:hook:knit

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I do and enjoy both crafts. Just speaking personally, I can crochet afghans SO much faster as to make it seem silly for me to knit one. Ditto for toys and objects with lots of shaping. But I usually prefer the look and feel of knitted sweaters and socks over crocheted ones, so I just knit them.

 

I agree with those who say that crocheting takes more yarn, so if I want to make a sweater in a fancy wool or alpaca, I'll definitely knit it. I almost exclusively crochet children's things in acrylic though, for speed and easy care.

 

Both crafts are fun and produce beautiful objects. It's just a matter of personal preference, and of what result you are trying to achieve. I think it is worth it to learn both in order to have the most options, but only if you CHOOSE to.

 

I always feel bad when I see someone put down someone else's craft choices.

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I do not understand some of the extreme reactions to the original post. Obviously it is one person's opinion. The art of crocheting has not been attacked and does not need to be defended.

It's the way she worded it.

While she didn't attack crocheting, she pretty much said to learn knitting and don't make certian things in crochet (and vice versa).

Not everyone wants to learn knitting. Those who know both don't want to make things in 'just one way or the other'. They like what they like and are entitled to liking it.

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I do not understand some of the extreme reactions to the original post. Obviously it is one person's opinion. The art of crocheting has not been attacked and does not need to be defended.

 

No, the art of crocheting has not been attacked BUT when someone says something we do is "amusing, no offense" that sounds as if she is looking down on us.

 

The wording was rude. She could have expressed her sentiments in a much more charitable manner and left the snide remark at home.

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I do both but much prefer crochet. I don't subscribe to any rules, but so far this is what works best for me:

 

I haven't attempted socks of any kind.

 

I both knit and crochet caps. Usually knit them for guys so they'll look more unisex, less feminine. However, some guys (esp younger ones) like the skater-boy crocheted caps now, so the knit-caps-for-guys rule is now gone!

 

I like crocheted caps for me because I can be more flexible with the style, plus they are thicker.

 

I like crocheted scarves, again with the flexibility of styling and stitches (for me).

 

I can't even conceive of knitting an afghan since I'm barely patient enough to crochet them due to the time commitment. (Though a knitted blankie would be wonderful, I'm sure). Might do a baby blanket at some point.

 

I crocheted my son a pair of thick, sturdy fingerless gloves, and he loves them.

 

I like Tunisian and Crochenit/crochet-on-the-double just fine too. I'm working on a Crochenit 'ghan for my BIL's birthday in March. It's stretchy, reversible, and doesn't look feminine. Crochenit is great for afghans and scarves. Did one for DH, and coworkers asked him if I'd make them one for a fee.

 

Basically I'll try anything craft-wise once. Like anything in life, you keep what you like and what works for you, and let the rest go. It's all good if you're playing with yarn, no matter how you do it!

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I tried to learn too and I could never get the hang of it either. But I want to learn someday, but I just want to learn how to make a dishcloth.

 

Carol:hook

 

I want to learn to knit so bad! I tried doing it a couple of months ago, but I find it so difficult to hold the needles....and I kept on dropping stitches. I know all I need is practice....I'm just a bit impatient. I want it to look awesome right away!! LOL

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The original post quite honestly had the same feel as "knitting snobbery". Quite distasteful!

 

I know you can get great results in crochet. I don't even think the two should be compared like it often is. They are completely self-sufficient, different crafts.

 

You can get adequate stretch in crochet, as well as thin floppy fabric. That's what my blog is all about. I have been accidentally developing a new crochet method that yields super thin fabric with worsted weight yarn and hangs like wet newspaper while being completely solid (no lace or eyelets to be found). It also happens to use about the same amount of yarn as knitting.

 

SIDEBAR: What is the obsession with the way knitting stretches anyway? When have you ever needed the amount of stretch you get from knitted fabric? The extreme stretch you get in knitting is often a detriment that has to be compensated for. Has anyone ever complained that the fabric their woven shirts, skirts or pants in their closet don't stretch? Relying on stretch for good fit only handicaps the needleworker from learning how to properly shape and size garments.

 

Personally I knit about as fast as I crochet...although I rarely do it. I knit combination style. Tunisian crochet has hands down been my favorite crochet method. (Kim Guzman and ARNie have inspired me so much.) My slip stitch method is naturally becoming my favorite too. You CAN have two favorites! :-)

 

I've met quite a few crocheters that are just as fooled as knitters in thinking that crochet is bulky and stiff and uses a ton of yarn. What we have to keep in mind is while knitting doesn't have distinct knitting methods (many different styles though), crochet does. So one can't even begin to make a fair comparison of the two crafts without a much broader knowledge of crochet methods.

 

Crocheted sweaters don't drape well? That tells me that someone simply doesn't have the knowledge needed to make drapable crocheted fabric. See...that's the key - knowledge. With a higher level of knowledge comes a versatile crochet talent.

 

I plan to celebrate the day when I no longer hear that crochet doesn't drape well. As I keep saying, crochet can be lank, springy, airy and is suitable even for men's clothes.

 

David Benjamin, That Yarny Guy

Get Yarny! at http://www.AYarnifiedLife.blogspot.com

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I think there will always be some snobbery among the crafters. But those who both knit and crochet can see and understand the beauty and practicality of both arts. I don't make socks, so I can't compare, but I have crocheted a few sweaters and caps, and even some mittens and booties, and I think they look very nice. My attempts at knitting have not produced anything thus far...not even a scarf! I am very clumsy trying to handle two needles versus one hook. And for the original poster who said it was "just as easy"... not true! I've tried to learn both methods,... and it is still clumsy and slow for me. Maybe if I practiced more?? But my patience wears thin when the yarn keeps falling off the needle and so I give up. My s.i.l. offered to work with me sometime to give me some pointers, but she is so busy with 6 kids, hubby and my f.i.l. I don't have the heart to occupy that much of her time!

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I took a knitting class at Michaels today. I find crocheting easier, but that is because I started crocheting a very long time ago. I want to stick with trying to learn knitting, but crochet is my first love.

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Why crochet socks? Well because I can and I find them everybit as comfortable as knitted and I can do them so much faster. Same for sweaters,gloves mittens etc. I was taught to knit when I was eight and always hated it. It was too slow and I am a really tight knitter. I finally gave it up completely when I was about 16. Crocheting has always been a pleasure. Too tight? Just go up a hook or two. Will I ever go back to knitting? Nope don't think so,I am a committed crocheter. :crocheting:hook

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