magiccrochetfan

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About magiccrochetfan

  • Rank
    Villager

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  • Real Name
    Kathy
  • Location
    Callaway County, Missouri
  • Interests
    taught myself to knit (combination style) in early 08
  • How long have you been crocheting?
    since about 1968 off and on
  • Favorite things to crochet
    it depends...

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  1. i don't actually see the pattern on that site. the photo in your post is of a v-stitch variation stitch pattern. which won't be the easiest kind of granny square to make, or fastest---if time is a concern. I guess i am not sure what you are asking? i don't have an opinion on the pattern because I don't see where the pattern is linked. but if time is a concern, and if you don't enjoy weaving in a lot of ends, I wouldn't try to make the one in your photo.
  2. multi-textured could mean a lot of different things, can you give us more info? maybe you could link to it on the Joanns site, or post a photo of it. depending on the yardage, with only 1 skein you might have enough to make a scarf or cowl, a hat or the front of a pillow cover.
  3. It looks the same as this shawl from the Stitch and Bitch book http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/sweet-pea-shawl its probably in other garments too, but I can't think of any right now. I don't think there is a specific name for the stitch pattern.
  4. i found the reference on J King's site, I guess its free but you have to go thru the ordering process to get it https://www.jennykingdesigns.com/product/asianchain-crochet-seam/ but even if you don't do that you can see a pic, where the seam is done in a darker yarn so you can identify it but you can really see how it blends in. i thought i might order it as i recall it being a really good tutorial, then i realized i already got it and have it saved....the RensFibreArt link above shows how, it is chain st #2 there. but Jenny's tutorial goes into much more detail.
  5. another approach to seaming a lacy garment would be to use a chain technique, that i first saw in posts by designer Jenny King (who called it Asian seaming technique because she first noticed it on well-made retail garments crocheted in Asian countries). You slip st or sc into your garment piece, chain a bit to get to another connection point, then stitch into the adjoining piece. thus the 2 garment pieces are joined together but the join itself is lacy and flexible like the rest of the garment. Ms King did have a blog post about it that i could access but i think it is now moved to a page of hers that you have to pay for. I will try to find that again, or another description, I know I was looking at something just the other day.... oh wait I think i remember ..... see Chain St #2 on this page https://rensfibreart.wordpress.com/handy-crochet-tips-tricks-2/d-joining-new-yarn-joining-fabric-squares-motifs/ or Ch St #1 for that matter (sorry for describing all the rummaging around in my memory )
  6. Amy, if I look at the all activity, i see each post separately, and also see that people started following someone or liked a post. I think the Unread Content is closest to what I wanted; there i seem to only see the most recent post in a given thread.
  7. As you know the diagram shows half doubles. As long as you did that stitch and have the right number on the last round, then you followed the diagram. Your soles look kind of skinny to me, compared to the photo on the blog. I guess your gauge is different than the writer's, stitches are more wide and possibly shorter. I would say it likely won't matter too much because the whole bootie will be soft and flexible, and who knows what exact size the baby's feet will be.
  8. that's adorable! and the doll has her own little stuffed animal, so cute. and the butterfly buttons!
  9. I'll wait patiently for everything to get up and running And i just noticed the little bell for Notifications, because it notified me of reply in this thread. that's pretty cool and something i don't remember from before....tho maybe i just don't remember lol since I can't remember what i did 5 min ago
  10. Amy and Donna, when you get a chance to post the Tips for using the new format, I am hoping you will explain the Activity function. As it is, I am seeing every post that is made which for some of the really active long threads is 10 or more posts showing up in a row. Previously i would go to New Posts or something and i would only see the most recent post in any thread. I need help to understand how the board is now set up to see new posts/new threads.
  11. Ah, I see what your concern is. I think it would be a simple matter of looking at the piece to see where to place your stitches to avoid twisting them or as you said working anti-clockwise. As long as you aren't doing that, you are good.
  12. Granddaughter squares cute name! OK so the tutorial does show the stitches being placed to the right of the chain. link for reference of others who havent seen it yet https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-crochet-classic-granny-square-3576784 that's one way to do this and yes it does leave a twist. If you continue to follow this pattern you will have a twist like this in every round, which could be pretty noticeable---if it were just one round it might blend in more. If you can live with the twist, that's great, forge ahead with this pattern. But if you don't like the twist then you have to do something different. The one-color granny square is actually more complicated than a multi-colored one. for the one-color square, I like the tutorial that Granny Square linked, it is simple and clear. For a multi-colored square you finish off at the end of each round and start with new yarn for the next round; if your stitches don't have much lean as RedRoses described, you may not need to turn your multi-colored squares. Now as far as turning being confusing---Many many patterns do involve turning. anything worked flat in rows, like many blankets or placemats or parts of garments, has you turn at the end of the row to begin the new row. So at some point you will most likely need to get used to turning. Unless you use a very limited range of patterns, you really can't avoid turning. So just want to encourage you to consider going ahead and practicing turning now.
  13. Hi, welcome from me too! Those tiny first round squares, did you know they can be used to make things? They're called Granny's Daughters and can be joined to make larger items. What pattern are you using? I saw one recently that did result in working backwards for a few stitches at the start of a round, so it may be possible that's what your pattern intends.
  14. Mary Jo, that shop sounds really interesting just to go and look!
  15. Oh my goodness, Anna, what a beautiful place! Thank you so much for sharing your photos, it is really a treat to see them!