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Tampa Doll

Falling Leaves Placemats

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I was looking for a pattern and came across this one in the October 1991 CrochetWorld magazine.

It is an easy pattern and great for someone who has never done a graph.  Good pratice.  I did not put the stems or veins in, as I suck at sewing and I tried but they did not look good.  I thought of painting the veins and stems on one of them to see how it looks.

Here are the placemats.  This pattern also includes napkin rings, pot holders and Coasters.

 

Fall placemats01.jpg

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Very nice :)

I tried graph once ( I made a Set) and I find out I do NOT like doing that. I can change colors with no problem. BUT what was driving me nuts it was that constant tangling of all those colors of yarns that I was working with. I spend a lot more time on-tangling those yarns than crocheting LOL.

Krys 

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Those are beautiful.  What a great way to brighten up a table for fall!!!

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1 hour ago, USpolishgirl said:

Very nice :)

I tried graph once ( I made a Set) and I find out I do NOT like doing that. I can change colors with no problem. BUT what was driving me nuts it was that constant tangling of all those colors of yarns that I was working with. I spend a lot more time on-tangling those yarns than crocheting LOL.

Krys 

The only thing that has ever worked for me at all are the yarn bobbins. 

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On 10/12/2020 at 3:01 PM, Bailey4 said:

Well I thought I was going to finish up with the Ugly Duckling but then ...

The Very Hungry Caterpillar Hand Puppet

Still have a swan wing and several finger puppets for the barn but getting closer to mailing.

So cute!!!! Love the little additions to the barn too!

On 10/13/2020 at 11:11 AM, Tampa Doll said:

I was looking for a pattern and came across this one in the October 1991 CrochetWorld magazine.

It is an easy pattern and great for someone who has never done a graph.  Good pratice.  I did not put the stems or veins in, as I suck at sewing and I tried but they did not look good.  I thought of painting the veins and stems on one of them to see how it looks.

Here are the placemats.  This pattern also includes napkin rings, pot holders and Coasters.

 

Fall placemats01.jpg

Beautiful!

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Thank you all.  I had fun making this.  Bobbins are the way to go when doing a graph.

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Pretty placemat! 

What would you use for painting the details? Some kind of marker or paint? 

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Very pretty

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5 hours ago, Apak said:

Pretty placemat! 

What would you use for painting the details? Some kind of marker or paint? 

I am not quite sure yet.  I was thinking of trying it on one with fabric paint.  I think that would be ok and not come off if something warm or hot is placed on it.

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Nice and cheery for Fall!  

Have you thought of surface slip stitch for the embroidery?  Would go quickly, harder to mess up (since it's not really freehand) and a quick yank to rip if you don't like the look.  

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1 hour ago, Granny Square said:

Nice and cheery for Fall!  

Have you thought of surface slip stitch for the embroidery?  Would go quickly, harder to mess up (since it's not really freehand) and a quick yank to rip if you don't like the look.  

This you will have to explain.  Do not know that stitch. 

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Here is a not-video tutorial https://www.crochetspot.com/how-to-crochet-surface-crochet-or-surface-slip-stitch/  Basically, you are making a slip stitch, but thru the gaps of crochet (or knit) fabric.  There are of course lots of videos out there too, here's one 

Your piece is SC, which is ideal for this.  Think of your SC fabric = the fabric that you would do cross stitch in, where there are little gaps between the warp and weft threads, where you'd stick your needle into--gaps just like SC has.  The fiddliest part is the very start, I think because it's odd to not start with a slip knot on your hook, and there's nothing to 'hold' it until the second stitch.

With the supply yarn underneath your fabric, holding a naked hook, stick your hook into the hole you want the yarn to come out of, and grab the yarn from underneath - guide the yarn a little with your left hand.  Pull up a loop.  *Stick your hook in the next hole in the direction you want to go - diagonally, up, or to the left if you are right handed, pull up a loop, repeat, changing direction wherever.  The first stitch for me is always loose, but just give a tug to the beginning end and you're good, the second  and beyond stitches will be secure and you'll be speeding along after another stitch or 2.  

 

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