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This is my first attempt to crochet & I’m struggling understanding the pattern. I would appreciate it anyone could help & explain.

1. 8x - I made a chain of 8

2. 8v - I did a line of single stitch but 2 per V ? Is this right 

3.(x.v)8 - need to increase to 24 - how should I spread it out

4(2x.v)8 - completely lost now 

 

any tips greatly appreciated 

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i'm going to explain my thoughts, but first:  I'd strongly suggest putting this pattern aside.  It is NOT a beginner's pattern, it is confusing and not at all conventionally written.  Even if it was for the cutest toy ever, I'd probably chuck it and look for another--I have been crocheting for close to 50 years and have never seen anything like it.  The designer invented their own terms.

When crochet patterns are written in words and abbreviations, there is a very specific grammar, punctuation, and very specific abbreviations defined to stitches.  They can also be written in symbols, where a specifically defined symbol is designed to each stitch.  This is a good site to bookmark, it's the US 'standard'.  Look at the menu on the right, all sorts of good things there, including the second and third items for crochet symbols and how to read a crochet pattern.

I can sort of see the logic of why it was written this way, but it would have been 100% less confusing if the writer used conventional abbreviations.  Apparently they "invented' new never-seen-before abbreviations  that vaguely look like stitch symbols.  Example, the symbol for a SC looks like X.  An increase is 2 stitches created from one, which in a  DC symbol would sort of look like V.  A decrease is 1 stitch made from 2, which again in DC would sort of look like A, although closer to /\ maybe.  A T is close to the symbol for HDC, and F is sort half the DC symbol.

First, the abbreviations:  The first 5 are standard stitches or stitch combinations (increase/decrease)  I've never heard of the last 2 terms before, and am not sure what they could mean.  Does it give a definition of how to MAKE the stitches in the abbreviation chart?  The T and the F I assume are from the stitch abbreviations above (HDC, and DC), but I have no idea what it means by 'back'.  The only thing that comes to mind is a reverse SC; if you are right handed you'd work your stitches from right to left; for a reverse SC, you work left to right, which is a little mind bending.  I've also never seen a reverse HDC or reverse DC (but I'd guess it would work), but the reverse SC is for an edging; it's twisted and doesn't have a normal spot that you could work another row into.  If it doesn't give an explanation for those 'back' stitches, that's even more reason to find another pattern.  It's always a good idea to read through a pattern and see it it all makes sense, or if it throws a new thing at you, that you understand how to do it.  

Assuming this all makes sense so far, and you know what those 'back stitches' are...you are not going lo like this, but rip out what you have done, as you've mis-read row 1.  I assume this an elephant toy that is 3 dimensional, not a flat applique.  3D toys are made in the round, starting with circle with a 'pinpoint' center.  Round 1 says "8x...8" which means 8 SC, not chains, and the second 8 means there are a total of 8 stitches in that round.  (the pattern does not appear to define chains; does it mention magic ring or adjustable ring or loop, which are ways to start a circle? )

If you are still following me, and haven't run away screaming yet (I probably would have...) The easiest way to start this, since this is your first project, is to chain 2.  Put 8 SC into the first chain you made (yes, they will all fit, trust me).  That's round 1.

Find a stitch marker - I like to use bobby pins, a safety pin would work but take care not to snag the yarn.  Now you will start round 2, which is 2 sc into each stitch from round 1.  You will keep the same side facing you.  Put the stitch marker into the first stitch of this round, and all future rounds, to help you keep your place.  Round 2, "8V" you started with 8 and are putting 2 sts into each st, will end with 16 stitches. 

Round 3 (this is so badly written, I hate to even encourage you to try to follow it): "(X,V)8" means make 1 sc into the next sc, increase in the following sc; repeat 8 times.  This will increase your stitch count by 8, for a total of 24 stitches. 

Please don't feel bad.  There is no way a beginner would know how to read this pattern.  I just know over umpteen projects that circles are made by starting with a number of stitches, and increasing by that same number of stitches; the way this is done is:

rnd 1, x sts

rnd 2, increase, 1 plain stitch, repeat

rnd 3, increase, 2 plain stitches, repeat

rnd 4, increase, 3 plain stitches, repeat...and so on.  Each round you add 1 plain stitch between increases

I may be off base, but I'm guessing you paid for this pattern based on the formatting of your scan.  I really suggest, since you are a complete beginner, that you start with free patterns on yarn websites ( like yarnspirations.com, lionbrand.com, redheart.com ), or a conventionally published book or magazine (like from Crochet! mag, Crochet World mag, Annies' Attic or Leisure Arts books/patterns).  Not to say that these are 100% error-free, but they are tech-edited and will be written in a much clearer and conventional manner than this one was.   And I'm sure there are many self-published designers with well written patterns, but there are also a lot of free, well written patterns too - at least if you run into a problematic free pattern, you aren't out any money.

 

 

 

 

 

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Wow, Granny Square, you never cease to amaze me. I glanced at the pattern and said, holy cow. It was just about an instant headache. You always do such a good job explaining things.

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Thanks!  I didn't realize I'd written a 'book' until I hit post  😂

To the OP - I also meant to add to my 'chain' comment above.  I'm having trouble imagining how you are going to somehow later do a HDC or DC, without 'chaining up' (a chain to bring you up to the taller stitch's height).

If you like, I could try to find a free pattern online that hopefully looks similar to yours, and proofread it for you to make sure it's conventionally written.  If it IS free or for sale as a discrete pattern online, post a link so I could see the finished pic; if it's in a book or magazine, give the pattern & source name, I may be able to find what it looks like on Ravelry.

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Wow thank you so much I wasn’t expecting this level of help

to be honest I’m completely overwhelmed trying to figure it out. I think your right I need to scrap it and start again. I was failing miserably and making up my own stitches haha I was going under one side of the stitch.

im not one for giving up so I’ve gotten different wool n found a you tube tutorial I’m going to try follow:-)

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Yeah, even though I think I was able to 'break the code' except for those back stitches, like Greyhoundgrandma said, it would have been a real headache. 

Just pointing out on your photo, I think what you meant by 'going under 1 side of the stitch' was stitching into the back loop, also called back loop only or BLO.  It makes ridges, which I'm seeing in your pic.  If you do SC in BLO (turning in rows, not in the round) it makes stretchy ribbing.  If you BLO same side facing, it's decorative and also a way to keep stitches lined up--but it is not typically used for toys, because you normally would want smooth fabric which happens when you insert the hook into both of the loops of the top of the stitch in the row below.

Hang in there.

Edit--it just occurred to me that those 'back' stitches may have meant 'back loop only/BLO'.  You normally don't see that on a toy except in strategic places - example for the elephant, I could see it where the bottom of the foot meets the sides; a ridge there would help define the shape and make the edge 'turn' a tiny bit sharper.  Or, if you were crocheting clothes right on a doll body, a round in back loop would make the clothes seem to  be on top of the skin.

Edited by Granny Square

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Thank you so much I’m back on track 

the chunky yarn turns out I’d near have a life size elephant haha so I’ve reverted to the original thinner yarn 

I’ll get there & enjoying the learning process :-) 

no doubt I will have many more questions 

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That looks better, stitch wise! 

Something to consider with bulky yarns...  I've noticed  lot of new crocheters seem to gravitate to them because it seems you can make a 'thing' faster because each stitch is ginormous.  However, it usually ends up a more expensive project because there's a lot less yardage on a skein of bulky weight, so you need more skeins.  And for a toy, smaller yarn is actually better, you can achieve more detail and denser stitches hold the stuffing in better.

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Can someone explain line 3 of the trunk pattern to me please is that an entire circle of stitching into one side of the stitch?FB93E319-0C0A-4722-B645-AF1391D5935F.thumb.png.438c23f39ce98f196731648440b945d4.png

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That's how I read it (or assume that's what meant).  The designer should have put the total stitch count (9) at the end of that round too, even tho it didn't change from round 2.

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Thanks guys I got so caught up in it I forgot there was a link to a video tutorial 🙄🙄🙄

no hope for me 🤣

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No problem.  Looking forward to seeing it when you finish.

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I see you found a better elephant pattern. I created my own elephant from ideas I got from other patterns. That trunk sounds better then the one I made for my elephant. BTW: With the right pattern, that bulky yarn might make a nice warn hat.

Ellie 13

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I went a bit rouge on the patterns    But had fun learning used a number of different stitches. It doesn’t look the best but it’s my first attempt so I’m pleased I actually finish it!

thanks for all the help on to my next project 😀

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Cute ! You did good for a beginner. I crocheted flat things for a year or 2 before attempting stuffed things. 

Ellie 13

  • Thanks 1

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