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sc behind each dc


Bailey4

Question

I'm working on an old Barbie pattern from the 70's and the terminology on this row has thrown me. Tower Press Publications p810

Row 3 DC in each sc across

Row 4 sc behind each dc across

Row 5 sc in each sc across

Row 6 Repeat row 4

First is row 4 a back post or a front post sc?  It makes for quite the bulky fabric

Second I am guessing they didn't realize that row 4 indicates you are working behind dc and there are no dc in row 5 to work around.

Thanks for any translations people would like to offer.

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Posted (edited)

My initial interpretation would not be a post sc, but they should definitely have been more specific.

OK, only row 3 is in DC, 'normally' done I assume.

Row 4, I am guessing 'behind' is more likely meant to be into the back loop of row 3's stitches.  This should be easy to tell by looking at the pattern photo in this spot, as working in the back loop would have the unused front loop forming a ridge, which could be decorative, or also functional as sometimes ridges are created to anchor something in a later row or round.  Example, if I were designing a Cinderella dress I might design unused loops at the waist to anchor the bustle or whatever that's called (I'm just guessing one possibility).

Edited by Granny Square
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Bless you.  I was hoping it was the back stitch as post stitches look awful. I'd just never seen it written this way so when it said behind rather than back I was confused.

It's an old black and white picture covered over by a shawl the doll is wearing but it didn't seem possible the dress was made with a couple of rows of post stitches.  This makes so much more sense.

Thanks for the assist.  I will try this out.

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How did it work?  Another, probably less likely possibility that popped into my head this morning, is working into neither of the top loops but rather a 'third' loop, like in this video.  I seem to recall reading someone published a book about this method and named it after him/herself, but I can't recall what the name was.

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That would be fun to try but there is nothing in the directions to indicate that you'd do a row in the back stitch to prep for the stitch in the video.  I might try it that way as there are a few patterns with the direction to see what kind of pattern it makes for the doll.

Working in the back stitch worked well for the pattern.  Thank you for the suggestion.

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