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dc in next dc


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I’m a beginner working a pattern and have understood so far but now I’ve got to “[inc, dc in next dc] 6 times” (English pattern) and I’m confused as to what it means. I get the increase but what double crochet am I then double crocheting into?

The next steps then follow on to [dc in next 2dc, inc] 6 times, [dc in next 3dc, inc] up until 5dc. 
 

I tried googling it and got two different answers one of which I didn’t understand. One said to dc in the next stitch but later on the pattern says dc in each st so I don’t know that it’s right… help please!! 

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Welcome to the 'ville and to crochet!

There are 2 ways (nowadays) to indicate a repeat, until recently the convention was to use an asterisk, like  "*xxxxxxxxxx, repeat from * 3 times more".  Now you see repeats in parentheses, or brackets in your case, which had until recently meant to put many stitches into 1 stitch, example [dc, tr, dc] in the next stitch.  *dc, tr, dc would be the conventional way to describe those same 3 stitches traversing 3 stitches, 1 stitch into 1 stitch, and repeat that sequence until it tells you to stop.  

The first part, “[inc, dc in next dc] 6 times” would be more conventionally written *inc, dc in next dc; repeat from * a total of 6 times”.

Your second part with a few extra words, and using asterisks for clarity: 

*1 dc in each of the next 2dc, inc in the following stitch; repeat from *5 times more (a total of 6 times), *dc in next 3dc, inc, repeat from * until 5dc remain.  (I'm guessing at the 'remain' part, that is the only thing that makes sense; it should tell you how to handle those 5 stitches, you could turn and work back and leave them there if you are making a garment and 'indenting' for the armholes for example.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Granny Square said:

Welcome to the 'ville and to crochet!

There are 2 ways (nowadays) to indicate a repeat, until recently the convention was to use an asterisk, like  "*xxxxxxxxxx, repeat from * 3 times more".  Now you see repeats in parentheses, or brackets in your case, which had until recently meant to put many stitches into 1 stitch, example [dc, tr, dc] in the next stitch.  *dc, tr, dc would be the conventional way to describe those same 3 stitches traversing 3 stitches, 1 stitch into 1 stitch, and repeat that sequence until it tells you to stop.  

The first part, “[inc, dc in next dc] 6 times” would be more conventionally written *inc, dc in next dc; repeat from * a total of 6 times”.

Your second part with a few extra words, and using asterisks for clarity: 

*1 dc in each of the next 2dc, inc in the following stitch; repeat from *5 times more (a total of 6 times), *dc in next 3dc, inc, repeat from * until 5dc remain.  (I'm guessing at the 'remain' part, that is the only thing that makes sense; it should tell you how to handle those 5 stitches, you could turn and work back and leave them there if you are making a garment and 'indenting' for the armholes for example.

 

 

Thanks for your response! 

Sorry to show my novice status but I'm still a little unclear. So dc in next dc just means to dc in the next stitch? So I increase in the first stitch, then dc in the second, and continue the round until I get to the end? Is there a reason for the difference of wording? Reading patterns is proving to be the biggest hurdle for me in my crochet journey so far :confused 

I've attached the pattern below just for reference just so it's easier than trying to decipher what I've typed.. 

pattern.jpg

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Correct, 'dc in next dc' USUALLY means crochet in the next stitch.  The exception would be if the row below was a mix of other stiches beside DCs-- example, if the prior row was alternating DC. chain 1, and the very next stitch was the chain 1, you'd skip it and work into the DC following it.  In that case most patterns would spell it out, they'd say 'skip the next chain, dc in the following dc", but not always. Your pattern is all DC, so there's no question that the next st is always a DC.

First, are you in the UK?  This pattern is in UK stitch terms.  Back 100 years ago or so, US and UK had the same names for the same stitches, but for some silly reason the US 'demoted' all the stitch names except slip stitch and chain.  A UK DC is a US SC.  I will use your patterns UK terms below.

Now, let's look at 'the plot' of what you are doing in the part of the pattern you shared, it might help if you saw the logic of what was happening.  When you make a toy, usually you start with a flat circle for a few rounds and then modify it so it becomes cup shaped, and then a ball maybe for the head, or a tube for a body.  Look at the stitch counts of rounds 1 to 7, you start with 6 UK DC and add 6 each round.

The way this happens, the first row is 6. 

Then in rnd 2 you put 2 DC into each of the 6, which gives you 12. 

Then in rnd 3, you put *1 DC into 1 stitch and 2 DCs (INC) in the following stitch, repeat, which gives you 18. 

In subsequent rounds you do the same thing but increase the number of 'plain' stitches between the increases, so round 4 ends up with 24 sts by making 2 plain stitches between increases instead of 1, in round 5 you make 3 plain stitches between increases, and so on, thru round 7.  Then in row 8 you 'work even) (no increases or decreases ), then you start doing this ore or less in reverse, decreasing every other round it looks like.  

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Also note this pattern gives you the stitch count for the rounds.  Those are the numbers at the end in [ ].  They can help you figure out if you made a mistake somewhere or if there is an error in the pattern.

There are 12 stitches in round 2 and 18 in round 3.  So you worked into all 12 stitches of round 2 but made 2 stitches into 6 of the stitches (in round 2) so you have 18 stitches in round 3.

 

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On 9/25/2021 at 12:24 AM, Granny Square said:

Correct, 'dc in next dc' USUALLY means crochet in the next stitch.  The exception would be if the row below was a mix of other stiches beside DCs-- example, if the prior row was alternating DC. chain 1, and the very next stitch was the chain 1, you'd skip it and work into the DC following it.  In that case most patterns would spell it out, they'd say 'skip the next chain, dc in the following dc", but not always. Your pattern is all DC, so there's no question that the next st is always a DC.

First, are you in the UK?  This pattern is in UK stitch terms.  Back 100 years ago or so, US and UK had the same names for the same stitches, but for some silly reason the US 'demoted' all the stitch names except slip stitch and chain.  A UK DC is a US SC.  I will use your patterns UK terms below.

Now, let's look at 'the plot' of what you are doing in the part of the pattern you shared, it might help if you saw the logic of what was happening.  When you make a toy, usually you start with a flat circle for a few rounds and then modify it so it becomes cup shaped, and then a ball maybe for the head, or a tube for a body.  Look at the stitch counts of rounds 1 to 7, you start with 6 UK DC and add 6 each round.

The way this happens, the first row is 6. 

Then in rnd 2 you put 2 DC into each of the 6, which gives you 12. 

Then in rnd 3, you put *1 DC into 1 stitch and 2 DCs (INC) in the following stitch, repeat, which gives you 18. 

In subsequent rounds you do the same thing but increase the number of 'plain' stitches between the increases, so round 4 ends up with 24 sts by making 2 plain stitches between increases instead of 1, in round 5 you make 3 plain stitches between increases, and so on, thru round 7.  Then in row 8 you 'work even) (no increases or decreases ), then you start doing this ore or less in reverse, decreasing every other round it looks like.  

Yes I'm in the UK. I knew about the difference in terms, confusing haha. 

Thank you so much for explaining it all so clearly, I managed to complete the section without a problem after reading your response :)

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On 9/25/2021 at 12:40 AM, bgs said:

Also note this pattern gives you the stitch count for the rounds.  Those are the numbers at the end in [ ].  They can help you figure out if you made a mistake somewhere or if there is an error in the pattern.

There are 12 stitches in round 2 and 18 in round 3.  So you worked into all 12 stitches of round 2 but made 2 stitches into 6 of the stitches (in round 2) so you have 18 stitches in round 3.

 

Yes I do try and count so I know if I'm doing something right, and if it's wrong I go back and see where I might've messed up. I find it really helpful when there's a stitch count!

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