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AsheSkyler

Simplifying Patterns

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I went looking for a simple circular pattern and got one mouthful after another. AUGH! Makes my head spin. So I figured up the average way to make a circle turned it into something much less wordy to make the pattern I'll use for simple circles:

Solid Circle, Base 8. Worsted Weight 4 Yarn, H/8/5mm Hook: row +1) [2 dc/st, dc (sts +1)] x8. sl st to close. = (sts +8). (size +1")

 

I can understand that. I find it much more straightforward and incredibly easier to write down for when I need to bring a pattern on the road with me but can't bring the book or ebook with me. It's also easier for me to figure up mathematically what I need to add from there on out to keep expanding the pattern as a flat circle. Sometimes when I feel fancy I'll put "sl st to close". I also feel freer to modify a pattern that way, such as starting a row in the middle of a side of a square rather than in a corner, since I'll know no matter where my ch3 is located my row will still add up correctly.

 

 

Do you ever feel overwhelmed by a verbose pattern and then break it down to something much more simple so you can understand it?

Edited by AsheSkyler
copyright: too much of pattern was posted

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I think we all have our own set of shorthand for ourselves when we are making alterations and such, so whatever works for you--I wouldn't recommend writing patterns for other's consumption that way, though.  

 

I had to smile when you called the first set 'wordy'.  You should try some vintage or 'expert' rated doily patterns--1 round can go on for half a page.  What I tend to do in that case (never in a library book, my own copy only)  is take a pencil and make slashes to separate 'steps' of a row. Sometimes I end up diagramming parts of a pattern so I could follow it easier.  Diagrams are great, no words needed!

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I think I saw one of my grandmother's books, and it was definitely one massive run-on sentence!

 

I'd intended to do three, actually. A truncated pattern, a verbose pattern, and a diagram. The truncated would give them an idea of what they needed and what general direction they needed to go in, the verbose would say explicitly how to do it, and the diagram to show how it's supposed to look.

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Are you writing up your own original pattern?  I'd say do it however you want to in that case.  For me, a diagram is all i want!  lol

 

the good thing aboout the wordy version in your post is that it does tell you exactly what to do and where to do it.  your truncated version would be confusing for some pople as they would not be sure where to put all of the sts.  

 

I have my own weird abbreviations and little symbols i use sometimes to make notes.  My big problem is that, assuming i don;t mislay the notes, sometimes i can't decipher them later  :P    Those things I think at the time are obvious, and of course i will think of it the same way later, don't always work out very well.  

Edited by magiccrochetfan

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I've got a handful of patterns ranging from basic geometic shapes to dolls that I'm working the kinks out of so I can sell the finished products, but I tend to get pretty discouraged about letting other people try them out to make their own things with. I'm generally not considered a good teacher and I seem to excel in confusing people because my way of thinking tends to be very different from theirs.

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So just write/diagram the patterns to suit yourself, make and sell the finished items, and don't worry about selling the patterns. From what i read, selling patterns is a ton of work that never ends because people want help with them, so you have to respond to that, and when they get pirated you may not be able to get them removed from illicit sites, and all knds of work beyond just writing the pattern in comprehensible form.

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I've been crocheting for decades and if I saw (only) your version of that pattern, even though it is for a very simple, basic thing, I'd push the page-back button quickly and go looking for another one rather than try to decipher it.  

 

It may be wordy, but there is a very good reason that standardized crochet pattern terms symbols, and grammar exists.  Same reason there are dictionaries, if evereewun speld the wai they wantud kno won wud undurstayund.

 

Not trying to be mean spirited.  Look at all the questions in the 'help' section from new crafters who are trying to understand a pattern (written the standard way for the most part).  Now, imagine the chaos if each designer wrote their patterns in a way they thought was best.  

 

I'm like Magiccrochetfan, I've looked at notes I've made on patterns and can't figure out what the heck I meant at --but thought it was important enough to preserve that nugget of information (whatever it was) then.  

Edited by Granny Square

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Can we get the thread back on track and away from how much everybody hates how I translate patterns to something I can understand?
 

Do you ever feel overwhelmed by a verbose pattern and then break it down to something much more simple so you can understand it?

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In your post #3 you talked about writing three versions of a pattern to "give them an idea". I thought the use of the word them meant you were going to write patterns for others to use. So i do have thoughts about that, having helped people understand patterns both online and in person.

 

But if you are only talking about making notes etc for your own use, then whatever works for you is great. Your truncated version is much easier to read than my own chckenscratch! As i said i confuse myself all the time, and it is usually easier to read my actual stitches than to read my notes....a real disadvantage when i choose yarn that obscures the sts like my current project. Like GrannySquare said, the info in my unreadable notes must have seemed important once but now i have no clue what it was lol

Edited by magiccrochetfan

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Reminder Note: So that we can avoid issues with copyright problems, our forum policies state that you should only provide instructions from one row of a pattern, possibly the row before if it is needed in order for someone to help you with the row you need help with.

Too much of the original pattern was included in the original post, so I had to edit it down to just include one row of instructions. I left the row that seemed the most complicated.

I agree with Kathy (magiccrochetfan) that the original pattern was written in what is considered standard pattern terminology, as followed by all the major publishers in the industry (magazines, books, etc.).

I also agree that that format often leads to some very long, unweildy pattern instructions.

 

For those who create their own shorthand versions of those long instructions, I think it would be very interesting to see all the different versions people come up with for their own use. I have a feeling there are probably many different variations.


 

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I've re-edited my post to have the pattern I made then:

Solid Circle, Base 8. Worsted Weight 4 Yarn, H/8/5mm Hook: row +1) [2 dc/st, dc (sts +1)] x8. sl st to close. = (sts +8). (size +1")

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