Jump to content
  • 0

Help with a pattern


Molliecrochets
 Share

Question



9 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Hi, welcome to the 'ville! 

This leaf is made in a method that causes a large portion of the of questions in this help section.  You are working in an oval, up 1 side of the foundation chain, and back down the underside of the same chain.

There are 3 loops of a chain.  Looking at it with the chain side facing you, there are 2 loops; flipping it over, you can see a back loop.  When working into both sides of a chain, do NOT use the back loop by itself, it will pull the work too tight.  I work into a chain, with the chain facing me, in the top loop only normally, and when working in an oval, I do the same, but on the second pass I use the other 2 chains--this is how I'm going to describe how to make the large leaf below.

Large leaf:  I turned that piece of your pattern right-side up so I don't have to keep turning my head: chain 7

chain 7.  First pass across the top loop of the chain: skip the first chain (6 chains remain) 2 dc means 1 dc in each of the next 2 chains (4 chains remain), 2htr means 1 htr in each of the next 2 chains (2 chains remain), 1 tr means 1 into the next chain (1 chain remains), 6 tr all in the next chain [now you have run out of chains on the top half, and the 6 into 1 at the end 'turn the corner' of the round, and also used up 1 chain on the underside of the chain, because of the turning-the-corner thing.]

Second pass across the remaining unused loops of the under-chain - turn the chain, same side facing you, so that the underside is now the top side.  The 6 stitches into 1 will be at your right (assuming you are right handed).  Because the 6 stitches that 'turned the corner' take up the last topside chain AND the first underside chain at the same time, you have 5 'chain bottoms' remaining.  1 htr in the next chain bottom (4 chains remain), 1 htr in each of the next 2 chain bottoms (2 chains remain), 1 dc into the next chain bottom (1 chain remains), 3 dc in the last chain bottom.  

That is a whole lot easier than it looks with all that typing, and is easier to DO than 'get it' by reading.   There are a lot of youtubes out there regarding crocheting in an oval in general, it might help you to view one to get the general concept down even if the stitch counts and types are different.

LARGE LEAF MADE IN AN OVAL.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Thank you so much for all that help I forgot to add the second round for the large leaf so I just continued on what u said it’s looking great but now I’m stuck at the last part the [1dc, 3ch, 1dc] in the next st, how would I do that? 

image.jpg

image.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • 0

Thank you so much for do for some reason when I was doing the last thing which I have never done a stitch and chain and then stitched in the same before I have only done multiple stitches with out the chains. it was making a weird shape at first  but I kept trying and it finally worked and the leaf is done, once all said and done it was very easy, I wish the terminology didn’t make it sound more complicated 

image.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Your leaf (petal?) looks great!  Yeah, it sounds complicated but really, there is no other way to write it out, is there?  It is telling you exactly what to do, it's just hard to wrap your head around working into both sides of the chain the first time you do it.

I'm not sure if this was the issue, but I know questions have come up before on something like 'dc, ch3, dc' in 1 stitch, ?how do I make a chain into a stitch?  You can't, ever, a chain between stitches is always going to 'float in the air' between the stitches on either side.  And like Bgs said, you can make a boatload of stitches into 1 stitch or chain, I know I've made close to 20 into 1 many times.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

I have one last question I’m making the soil base for the plant and I have done other sizes and I have used adjustable ring but this size want me to continue into the next round with different stuff and then tells me the next round is 1dc in each im so confused 

image.jpg

image.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

An adjustable ring is just a slip knot, exactly the same as you put onto your hook without thinking - except - you don't pull it tight over the hook, you leave it loose in a circle.  Assuming you are right handed, the cut end of the yarn is trailing off to the left, the source yarn is on your right.

Stick your hook in the usual spot you would if you were going to tighten the knot, but don't tighten it, leave it in an open loop--you will be working over the loop.  Grab the yarn as usual, and make 6 DC around the yarn ring.  (this pattern is in UK terms, the 'dirt' is US SC, which = UK DC.).  Tighten the ring after you finish the first round of 6 DC.

A lot of 3-D things, like toys (which often start with a roundish head), or your dirt, start out in this formula to make a flat circle at first, which varies after a few rounds to create the shaping of your dirt, a teddy bear head, whatever: first round is 6 sts, second round is 2 sts into each stitch for a total of 12, then each round adds 6 stitches (so round 3 is 18 sts, round 4 is 24 sts, and so on--the # of plain stitches between stitches with 2 into 1, increases each round)*.  This creates a flat circle; if your dirt is starting at the top, the pattern will stop adding as many stitches where the top stops being flat, and starts to curve, and subtracting more gradually each round as it narrows to the bottom.  

You will be making stitches in a spiral - I strongly suggest you get a stitch marker to mark the first stitch in each round - I use a bobby pin, but you could use a safety pin or even a short piece of contrasting yarn pulled thru a stitch to mark it.  When you reach the marker, take it out, make the first stitch in the new round, and replace the marker in the new first stitch.

Flat circle recipe:

*rnd 1=6

rnd 2 = 2 into each stitch, total =12

rnd 3 = *2 into the first stitch, 1 stitch into the next 1 stitch, repeat = 18

rnd 4 = *2 into the first stitch, 1 stitch into each of the next 2 stitches, repeat = 24 total

rnd 5 = *2 into the first stitch, 1 stitch into each of the next 3 stitches, repeat = 30 total, and so on will be the pattern of a flat circle

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
Posted (edited)

I completely understand all that ur saying. I did make other sizes but in the picture if you look at the 4th round in my picture instead of it having me increase it and go from 18sts to 24sts it wants me to go from 18sts for 26sts, the exact thing it says is *2 dc in next st, 2 dc six times (that means 2 double crochet (uk) in the next st,  then 1 double crochet (uk) for the next 2 sts six times = 24sts) but then says continue into the next round with *2 dc in the next st, 3 dc* twice some how ending the round with 26sts 

Edited by Molliecrochets
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...