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Shirley J

How would this rate

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Hi,

I"m fairly new to making garments, having just completed my first sweater. The pattern was listed as easy. I am now inspired to try again. I came across this pattern but it doesn't say what level of expertise it is so I  am hoping that some of you more experienced ladies would be able to take a look and give me your opinion. I've looked at the pattern and have some questions but then I had questions on the other one that I just made and managed, with the help of others to finish it. Here is the pattern link: http://knitted-patterns.com/knitting-for-women/crochet/tunics-dresses/3227-cranberry-sweater-tunic

 

Thanks in advance.

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I'd rate this as easy but maybe not a first-project beginner pattern.  Nice pattern, lots of pullovers have wide necks nowadays and this looks nice and cozy.  If it's cold enough for knitwear, I don't want a drafty neck!  :lol 

The 'hard parts' would be the foundation SC which is the only 'non-basic/classic' stitch (although one could always start with a chain); understanding clothing construction in general; and working into the side of the ribbing to start the body and upper sleeve.  Drop sleeves are pretty easy, not much shaping and relatively painless to assemble.

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Forgot to ask, what are your questions? 

I just noticed the gauge included one for ribbing stitches, I wonder if that means a rib which is 2 rows /\ .  I'd probably carefully check gauge on the body and let the ribbing follow that trend (if you have to go up 1 hook size for the body, also do so for the ribbing for example)

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Thank you very much. Granny Square I would like to say a very special thank you to you for always answering my questions and providing the help I've needed to get the job done. I'm sure, if you're willing I'll be relying on your expertise in the near future.

 

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Another question on this pattern... I'm about to do the gauge check but I'm a bit confused. It says 30 body pattern sts (I understand what those are) = 7 inches. Does this mean that if a chain 30 and then do a row of pattern stitches it should measure 7 inches? Also, is this stretched at all or just as it lays?

 

The same with the 20 rows = 5 1/2 inches.

I know I'm supposed to block once done so do I measure after blocking? Am I correct in thinking that when you block it stretches it a bit? Thanks

 

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I would chain a few more than 30 stitches, and then measure the 'inside' 30 stitches.  Reason is, the stitches on the edges can be atypical and throw your gauge off a bit. You're probably OK with the 20 rows (meaning you probably don't need to do more than 20).  If the row height is off a little, it's not as big a deal (usually), notice your pattern says 'work until piece is xx inches' (not rows) in a few spots.

What kind of yarn are you using?  I use mostly acrylic, and don't bother blocking.  Wool would be a good idea to wash (or just get wet) and block - don't stretch it, just lay it out and finger block so it lays flat.  Like you would with a garment with washing instructions - hand wash, lay flat to dry.

If your width gauge is off - count the number of stitches you have in some number of inches (the more the better), also count partial stitches as best you can.  What you want to do is calculate the width of 1 stitch.  You are supposed to get 30 stitches in 7", 7 divided by 30 is 0.23333.  Let's say you are making the small, 36" finished width; the back and front are both 78 stitches across, so 78+78=156 stitches, times 0.233 is 36.3".  If your gauge per 1 stitch is different, you can do the same math for different sizes; example if you wanted a medium, but your stitches are a little big it might fit you perfectly if you followed the small pattern's stitch counts with your bigger gauge.  Notice there's 4 inches between sizes, so there's a little bit of leeway in the fit.

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So wool, you'd want to gently hand wash and dry your swatch, with all the caveats about not agitating etc. to avoid felting/shrinking, and pat into shape without stretching.

If you hit gauge exactly, you don't have to worry about the math.  The 0.2333" per stitch is the width of the stitch if you hit the pattern gauge exactly (7 inches divided by 30 stitches = the width of 1 stitch).  What I was trying to say if you can't hit gauge, you can figure out how much bigger or smaller the sweater would be by multiplying the number of stitches across your size (front + back) by the width of 1 stitch. 

Example, for the small size it's 156 stitches front+back for the sweater.  Let's say you measured your 30 stitch swatch as 8 inches instead of 7; that would be 8 inches divided by 30 stitches = 0.2666 inches per stitch.  0.2666 inches times 156 stitches is 41.6 inches for your sweater, if you  followed the small size.  I was just trying to explain how to figure out the consequences for not hitting gauge, sometimes you can make it work to achieve a fit by following a different size of the pattern to reach a measurement that fits you.  The 2 things you need to know is the number of stitches around, and the width of your stitch.

If you want, swatch and tell me what you measured (if you're off) and I'll do the math for you ;) 

Edited by Granny Square

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OK so after blocking it measures 7 1/4 across and 5 7/8 deep . I'm making a medium (40). So that would be 86 +86 for 172 stitches across. So that would be 7.25 divided by 30 = 0.241 x 172= 41.56.  so is this right? Would I be ok with this gauge without changing the needle size?

 

 

 

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So the sweater would be about 1 5/8" bigger around than the pattern intends for that size.  A couple of things I've done decide this sort of thing:  (1), lay a similar garment (stretchwise) that you like the 'fit' of, out on the bed and measure it.  How does it compare?  Do you think you can live with the difference, if there is one?  (2), if you have a tailor's tape,  wrap it around yourself and hold it in place at 41 5/8 inches at bust, tummy, hip and see how that 'feels'.  

The 40" was a a finished measurement, so the answer will be how close is that you your body measurement and how much ease (+/- to your body) you are comfortable with.  If it seems too big, you might have to re- swatch with the next smaller hook size.

Since you are getting a bigger fabric...just for fun, checking out what happens if you followed the smaller size : .241" x 156 stitches = 37.6"

 

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Well at one point I thought I had some clarity but now I'm hopelessly confused again. So before when I did a sample and then blocked it, I think I stretched it out. So the sample came out too big. Also, I don't think I was measuring it properly. So I've tried another sample. This time I did 40 stitched ( you'd said it was better to do a few more) and 20 rows. Then I measured the whole piece and my stitches per inch came out really small, like 4.57. I do tend to crochet tighter as opposed to looser but I didn't think that tight. So what do I do now. After doing some reading it said to go down a hook size  but that would make my hook a 2.75. That's getting really small. :(

 

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Ok, refreshing my memory here... the pattern gauge is 30 stitches= 7".  So each stitch should be 0.233".

In all my math examples earlier, stitches per inch wasn't what I was focusing on.  It was inches per stitch.  Pattern gauge per stitch is 0.233".  With 4.57 stitches per inch as you measured, 1 inch divided by 4.57 stitches = 0.2188 inches per stitch.  Your stitches are too small, you need a bigger hook!  Or, maybe figure the .2188" per stitch x the number of stitches in the other sizes and see if another size than what you were thinking works for you.

 I always have to double check myself even tho I've done this bunches of times I sort of have to draw a picture in my head--the more stitches per inch, the smaller the stitches.

 

 

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OK so I went up to a size 5 hook and did 40 stitches that measured 9.5 inches across. 40/9.5=4.210. 1/4.210=0.237x 172 =40.855. So if the finished size is 40 I should be ok now or should I try a smaller hook to try and get closer to 40.

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Can I pester you with another question.  At the beginning of the instructions for the ribbing it says " Multiple of any number of sts. ". What do they mean by this?

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16 minutes ago, Shirley J said:

" Multiple of any number of sts. ". What do they mean by this?

It means you can make the ribbing with any number of stitches.  it doesn't have to be an even number, or an odd number, or a multiple of any certain number.  

the ribbing is made in a strip and then to start the body you work into the ends of the ribbing rows.  

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^What she said.  The ribbing is made in the floor to ceiling direction, in other words 90° from the direction you make the sweater .  So you could make it shallower or deeper if you want by changing the number of stitches.  It's the side of the ribbing stitches that attaches to the sweater, so the number of rows can't change.

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https://knitted-patterns.com/knitting-for-women/crochet/tunics-dresses/3227-cranberry-sweater-tunic

 

I tested my gauge. I get the right number of stitches but my rows are off. For example, when I do the ribbing I'm supposed to do 96 rows which is supposed to measure 20 inches. Then I work 86 stitches into the 96 rows. I only get 16 inches. I don't know what to do. If I go up in size my stitches will be off and then I would also have to go up a size to do the body which would make that off as well.

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Does the pattern say the ribbing should measure 20"?  I looked at it but didn't see that info.  I see the schematic shows 20" for the second size.  But maybe the ribbing is supposed to stretch to 20"...is yours very stretchy?  

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No it didn't say it measures 20 inches but when you look at the diagram it does show 20 so I figured that is what I was supposed to end up with. I'm using that foundation chain stitch to start so it does stretch pretty good.So do I just stretch it?

 

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The other thing I was thinking - if you look at the diagram it shows the sweater straight up with no indent. If I go with the stretching to 20 will it still be straight up or will it pull in, if that makes any sense.

 

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1. the gauge is stated as being after blocking.  did you block your ribbing?

2.  did you swatch the body stitch pattern and block it?  

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