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BriezyHats

I simply cant read a pattern!

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I want to start making mittens, animals, sweaters, ect. but i cant read a pattern! i don't know the lingo.. it just doesnt make sence with out pictures. im a picture person. so what do i do? are patterns simple to read? help! thanks....

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I've never thought that patterns were too difficult once you get the hang of it and most patterns do have a directory of the abbreviations that they use. But my grandmother who crocheted a lot and taught me never could read them as she went. She would actually sit with the pattern and write it out in longhand without the abbreviations before she would start the project. Maybe that would help you until you get the hang of it.

 

Most abbreviations are simple. SC--single crochet. DC--double crochet, etc. It's just following the complete sentences that might give you fits for awhile. That's where writing them out might help you.

 

Does that help you at all?? :lol

 

Maybe if you include a line or two from your pattern we could help get you started....

 

:hookColleen

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Your hats are great! I am self taught and if I can learn to read a pattern, anyone can. Start with something easy and before you know it you will pick it up in no time.

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Patterns aren't that difficult to read once you get used to the lingo. I usually read the entire thing first, then go through it line by line. I agree that it might help to write it out, especially if you have one that says something like:

 

Ch 1, sc in first sc, *(ch 5, sk next 3 sc, sc in next sc) twice **

 

It's easy to lose track of what you're supposed to do when you have to repeat an entire section a few times before moving on. So writing it out in steps and crossing off each one you do helps to keep track and prevents urges to rip out your hair in frustration. Even if I'm not writing out the pattern, I'm making notes and checking things off on a photo copy of the pattern I'm working on. And remember, if you're just having trouble trying to figure out what the pattern is telling you to do, there are plenty of people on here willing to help you make sense of it all. :)

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It's a foreign language, so treat it like one. Write out each line of the pattern, in full. Don't use abbreviations until you are completely comfortable with them. I take a ruled tablet and write out the lines, and if a line repeats, I write repeat row x next to the number of the row. Then check them off with a pencil as you go. Even the instructions within a line if you need to.

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Oh, sweetie, I've pattern dyslexia - if I can do it, anyone can do it! Photocopy the pattern and work with highlighters. I use two colours and highlight every alternate line as I do them. So when I've finished a 'pink' line, I highlight the next in blue and work through it slowly. Then I highlight the next in pink, work through it again. I seldom make anything just once: once I figure out the pattern, I do it two or three times till I don't need the pattern any more! After that it's muscle memory, my brain remembers how to do it visually.

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The way I learned the basic stitch lingo was to remember that each stitch is just an abbreviation of the name of the stitch.

 

For example:

dc means Double Crochet

sc means Single Crochet

hdc means Half Double Crochet

 

Try practicing, study the lingo and then take a hook and yarn and try to remember the abbreviations and do them.

 

When I first started I found that it helped to say it out loud. For instance if the pattern read : ch 10, sc in second ch from hook and each ch across.

 

I would read it aloud and say the name of the stitch instead of the abbreviation.

 

so I would say: Chain 10, single crochet in second chain from hook and in each chain across.

 

Sometimes if I am working on a particularly hard pattern I will still say it out loud, just so that I can hear what I am reading.

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Don't feel bad I've heard of alot of people that cannot read patterns.I don't really use abbreviations in the patterns I make either. I do agree though that if you read a pattern line by line then write in what you need to help you along that would help alot. Is it just the abbreviations you don't get or what ?

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Have you tried using patterns that include stitch diagrams? Like this http://grannys-garret.com/symbol_crochet/symbol_crochet.html

 

Resources for this include:

Robyn Chachula's new book Blueprint Crochet is all diagrams

Crochet Today magazine uses lots of diagrams I beleive

Interweave Crochet magazine uses some diagrams

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Of course you can learn to read a pattern. You didn't know how to read anything until you were taught. You just have to take the time to learn the lanuage. If you need to, write the instructions out yourself: That way you will learn what the abbreviations mean as you translate them into complete words.Take the time to understand how the brackets , ie: ( ), [ ], { }, and symbols are used, they are there to help you understand what to do. It's like learning anything else, it takes time and patience and practice.

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I learned from starting with fairly simple patterns. The only thing that gets me now is if they don't say how many stitches are in a row/round so I can check my work or if they don't say exactly how many times to repeat (ex. "repeat until end of row" vs. "repeat 6 times") so I add those notes in myself as I make a pattern the first time.

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In addition to writing out the words, you might try to visually separate the steps of the written pattern.

 

I like to make doilies (for which charts are the BEST). Doilies sometimes have complicated steps that appear as a long paragraph for each round, and each round is different :eek Right now I'm working on one that has 1 round which is 9 lines of type printed in 10 point font with half inch margins. Oh, and after executing all that, repeat it 12 times in the same round! (I had to chart it out).

 

For example, instead of

sl st into ch-3 lp, (ch 1, sc) in same lp, ch 3, (sc in next ch-3 lp, ch 3) around, join with sl st in top of first sc

 

Break it up to read:

slip stitch into ch-3 loop,

(chain 1, single crochet) in same loop,

chain 3,

(single crochet in next chain-3 loop, chain 3) around,

join with slip stitch in top of first single crochet

Edited by Granny Square

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I have been crocheting a long time and have taught crocheting for a lot of years. The thing is no of us learned quickly, it took us all time to learn the stitches and what the abbreviations meant. So hang in there, you will get it don''t rush. :clap Molly

Edited by MsMolly

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hang in there - one suggestion is to know what the end result is then focus on the instructions between the , , before you know it - you'll be done:cheer

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If I learned how to read them you can too. It's funny though because most people I run into can't read a pattern. I will meet someone sometimes at my sons bowling and be working on something and see someone else crocheting and try and ask her a question and I get oh I can't read patterns I only know this one stitch that grandma taught me. I say get a book from the library and read the abbreviations and learn to read a pattern then you will take off and be able to crochet so many things. I would find it very boring just to know on stitch and only how to make one thing. Then again I never make the same prayer shawl twice so maybe that's just how I am, like to try different things. Mary

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start with the easier patterns i have known how to crochet since i was 8 but i always just made a simple double crochet afghans they were nice but not as nice as what i can do now after my mom passed away i decided i was going to learn to read a patterns and actually make it look like the pattern most patterns will have a picture of the finished product but like i said your better off starting out with easy patterns such as ripple afghans thats where i started about a year ago and now im making cool stuff still simple things but cool you can see what i have made in my blog if i can do it anyone can do it have faith in yourself and just say I AM going to do this and if you dont get it right the first time keep trying till you get it as far as reading lingo theres a wonderful little book out there called the crochet answer book by edie eckman i got it and its all in there it helps a whole lot also i went to you tube and found teresa tjw1063 she shows how to do alot of things shes really the one that gave me confidence that i could do it i made a heart watching her one night i was so excited heheheheh so just dont give up and always remember the ville is here to help too this is a great crochet community lots of wonderful, talented people

P.S for years and years id see things like fancy afghans and say gosh i wish i could make something like that but i just cant follow a pattern well now that i can do it it is so easy it really is once you get the lingo so dont give up!!!

I know you can do it!!

Janny

Edited by grannyzkraftz
misspelled words arg

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You said that you need a picture to refer to. There are many people out there who are in the same boat. I don't speak from experience, but my sugestion would be to 1. just set pattern reading aside until you aren't so frustrated by it any more. 2. get ahold of some charted patterns, a key to what the symbols mean, and instructions on how to follow the chart. There was a good example chart already linked that might be a good jumping off point. 3. Once you have a good handle on following a chart, find a source for patterns that have both the chart and written instructions for the same steps. There are many out there that rely on both, but for different parts of the pattern. I don't know any free or online sources, but the book Crochet Stitch Bible is what I learned to read both types of instructions from. 4. Try taking a simple pattern without a chart and drawing it out with the symbols. Once you get to this point, you've got it. It might take a while, but just take your time, ask for help when you need it, and you'll get there.

Edited by forestergirl

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You said that you need a picture to refer to. There are many people out there who are in the same boat. I don't speak from experience, but my sugestion would be to 1. just set pattern reading aside until you aren't so frustrated by it any more. 2. get ahold of some charted patterns, a key to what the symbols mean, and instructions on how to follow the chart. There was a good example chart already linked that might be a good jumping off point. 3. Once you have a good handle on following a chart, find a source for patterns that have both the chart and written instructions for the same steps. There are many out there that rely on both, but for different parts of the pattern. I don't know any free or online sources, but the book Crochet Stitch Bible is what I learned to read both types of instructions from. 4. Try taking a simple pattern without a chart and drawing it out with the symbols. Once you get to this point, you've got it. It might take a while, but just take your time, ask for help when you need it, and you'll get there.

 

Sounds like a good approach! some free patterns that have words and diagrams are here http://www.crochettoday.com/freeprojects.aspx click on the name to open a pdf. the Julie cuff is a good one to look at because it has really clear photos and you can match the photo to the diagram. it's from the Blueprint Crochet book.

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:thinkHi,

 

I can not make anything just by reading, till I try to figure what it says I make the things from picture. I know how to read diagrams :):yes:hook

 

Only written instruction without picture:no impossible!!!:think

 

Demet

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