Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Jempast

Which is faster crocheting loosely or tightly?

Recommended Posts

I was wondering if one was faster than the other or the same crocheting tight vs. loose. I crochet tight but it seems to go really slow. I hate crocheting loosely because it looks to sloppy to me.

 

Is there a difference in the speed between crocheting loosely or tightly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I want to crochet a project fast that doesn't require a specific size I just use a larger hook.

 

I find if I crochet tight that it hurts me physically eventually. Too loose though and it looks bad. FInd a happy medium.

 

Donna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If I want to crochet a project fast that doesn't require a specific size I just use a larger hook.

 

I find if I crochet tight that it hurts me physically eventually. Too loose though and it looks bad. FInd a happy medium.

 

Donna

 

 

I agree about crocheting too tightly that it hurts your body physically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the too tight hurting too... I have a medium tension (so I've been told) and I find projects move along fast enough that I am not feeling bored with them lol...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crochet loosely works for me in crocheting fast (and I get comments on my fast crocheting all the time so it must be true).... When I've had to crochet tight for a project (hated it) it did hurt my hands and I couldn't crochet for a long period of time. I find crocheting loose isn't too bad in making projects, except garments where I end up changing hook sizes or sizes on the garment (such as doing a small instead of medium which makes it a medium).

Debbi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There will probably be a slight difference in size but I doubt in time. A stitch is a stitch. It takes however long to make the stitch.

 

Crocheting tight hurts your hands. Crocheting loose looks sloppy. Crochet in the middle and get into a groove and the stitches just fly by.

 

If you want to work on increasing your speed then practice some speed drills. I did that with scarves. I picked a stitch and worked it on the long. Before I knew it I was comfortably crocheting faster than I would've believed possible when I first started.

 

Time how long it takes to do the 2nd row. (Working into the chain doesn't count). Then practice crocheting as fast as you can while still keeping it neat. By the time you get to your last row of the scarf - you'll be surprised at how long it doesn't take.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got practice by making a baby blanket. It was all DC and boy did I get the hang of my tension on that one. I still feel like I have too high tension though because my fingers on my yarn hand start to get nice groves in them and I have to stop or move things around.

 

My hook hand doesn't hurt unless I'm trying to do things really tight like amigurimi.

 

RoseRed has a point about practicing though. I like the scarf idea! Like I said, I got into a pretty good rhythm on blankets.

 

To answer your question though, I think it does take longer to crotchet tightly. I'm constantly pulling the yarn taut and it breaks up the rhythm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just attempt to crochet as consistently as possible. I rarely crochet super tight, however I've been told that my tension is tighter than others. For me, consistency is the most important aspect --- bigger hooks or smaller hooks, just make the stitches look the same throughout.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first learned to crochet I worked too tightly, and it seemed very difficult for me to loosen up. My mother absolutely rode me about it. Once I finally did, I could hardly believe how much more I enjoyed my crochet and the look of my projects improved.

 

After I loosened up, my sts became more consistent and I could work faster.

 

The only time I am purposefully slow is doing the 1st row into the starting ch in order to have it nice and even.

 

Actually, I've been even slower than normal recently while trying out the "sc into the back bump of the ch" to do the 1st row into the starting ch. I didn't think I was going to like this method, but I LOVE how it comes out! It IS very slow but makes a great beginning edge. I just flip the entire ch upside down and keep it flat on top of one of my fingers, and crochet into that bottom loop, which I can now see in this position.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know - it does take a little bit longer but the results are soooooooo worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree the fastest way to stitch is consistent. I do think tight is slower because it will be harder to get your hook into the tight stitch.

 

Now this sc thing into the bottom loop. I just saw a pattern this morning that called for that and now I have to try that!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It makes such a difference working sc into the bottom lp of your starting ch. The edge it leaves is soo nice. And even if you want to work all the way around the starting ch, do it anyway, because it gives you a much better edge to work into after going around the 1st end. You'll end up with a much more solid center up through the 1st rnd also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think consistency is more important then loose or tight. I think you develope as you practice. Keeping a consistent tension on the yarn will help produce consistent stitches. Crocheting should not be difficult, it should be rythmic and relaxing, I think trying to crochet tight would cause tension in your hands and shoulders.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I have more of a medium tension. I have been told I crochet fast, but I have nothing to compare it against. I also crochet into the back bump, but now when the first row is all sc or dc or what have you, I do fsc or fdc. It really was bothering me that that first row was usually narrower. I didn't like using a bigger hook for the chains because they just seemed sloppy though I will do it if the first row is not uniform. It has made a huge difference in having both ends of a blanket or scarf or whatever be more equal. I also like to use the handle tubes for the thinner hooks so I have a comfortable grip on the hook. One thing I want to try too is adding some lotion, I think. I have heard that it helps the hook glide more smoothly through the stitches. It may work. You never know. I just want to make sure I don't use a lotion that will mess with the yarn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...