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Anyone hear of this before?

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In reading a "children's" book (about 5th grade level?), where the main characters are forced to leave Mexico for the US, the grandmother teaches the main character (a girl) to crochet, working on a ripple afghan...any time a hair fell onto the work, she would pick it up and tuck it along the top row, to be crocheted into the work...like putting a piece of herself with it, and I believe it was associated with extra blessings for the recipient, or something like that. But it was definitely a tradition of goodwill.

Anyway, I thought it was a really sweet notion, and I thought of it the other day again, when my yarn picked up some hair on it's own, on its way to the wip it belonged to. :)

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I haven't heard of it, but I know my pets always make sure a little bit of them has been included :lol

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I've heard of that before, just didn't know it was written in a book.

With as much hair as I shed, I can almost guarantee that there is at least 1 strand of my hair in everything I have ever crocheted :lol

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I haven't heard of it, but I know my pets always make sure a little bit of them has been included :lol

:lol Mine too. And my own hair. :yes

Until I wash it (if it comes out).

Momcrochets, what was the name of this book?

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I had read about working strands of peoples hair into like a quilt. As a remembrance and for good luck.

I work strands of my hair into my work all the time. But I remove them since I have dark hair and I normally work in light colors. The hair looks like a dirt spot if I don't.

But I have read this before.

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I read a that 100+ years ago ladies would monogram handkerchiefs with their hair. I try to keep my hair out, but everything I've made must have hair in it. I've never heard of actually putting it in. Sounds interesting.

Ellie 13

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I've never heard of intentionally weaving hair into your project. I suspect that some of mine has lab hair in it. I always try to pick it off and get it all if I'm giving the piece away, but I bet there's almost always some left.

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That is such a nice story....It reminds me of something my mother in law told me this Christmas. She has a small dog that loves me. When she (the dog) hears my name, she runs to to door looking for me. I sent her a dog toy that I crocheted.... When my mother in law gave it to the dog, the dog would not let go of it. It was like she could smell me on it. :) (I have no doubt also that hair went into that project) LOL...

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In some of the versions of Tristan & Isolde, she sews her hair into a shirt she's making for him, and it's part of a sort of "love spell".

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I remember during the 1976 Winter Olympics in Innsbruck they did a story about the women knitting or crocheting a piece of their hair in the part of a sweater that would lay over the heart of the wearer. I thought it was interesting and I'm really surprised that I remembered it.

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My nieces would be surprised and delighted to here this. They are always commenting to Grandma that they found Aunty Di's hair in their latest Doll's Outfit that I send them. LOL.

 

Definately not by choice but maybe the angels are watching over us all and making sure that this happens..

 

P.S. I would also like to know the name and author of this book, please

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The book is Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan, and it has some lovely thoughts about crocheting. Any crocheter would enjoy reading about how Esperanza first doesn't want to learn to crochet, but eventually it becomes very important to her. It will be easy to find at the library, used, or in bookstores.

 

I had never heard of this before I read the book, but I thought it was neat because I'd had the same thought while making baby blankets for my nieces! (maybe it was just wishful thinking, because my hair sheds and sticks a LOT, but I liked getting the justification...)

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The book I read about the quilting was called a Stitch in Time. I do not remember the authors name and my book is in a box someplace. It was a mystery set in a quilt shop. Really an enjoyable read. But part of the plot had to do with the hair being sewn into the quilt.

I just did a quick search and the author's name is Monica Ferris

I do know that hair was a accepted fiber for lots of needlecraft items in days gone by. It was a lasting momento of loved ones.

 

Regardless of that, I will continue to remove my wayward hairs from my work.

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Before I took my hiatus from crochet, I would include any wayward strands into whatever I was working on at the time. I haven't been doing so since I resumed

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That book sounds delightful - in fact ANY book with crochet themes would be welcome! (I have a few with knitting themes but never seen any crochet.) I love the idea of the family involved in your story.

 

But in real life, well :yuck is all I can say. Sorry ladies, maybe I'm the only one who feels that way, but I think it's pretty gross. I do have long hair, and if I ever see a strand in my crochet work I will gently pull it out. Even for items I'm keeing myself. Honestly I'd be horrified if I gave somebody a project that had hair in it.

 

Edited to add: Oh but now I'm finding it funny! I always include washing instructions with any gifts, can just imagine having to modify it "Cool wash with gentle soap powder, tumble dry low OR shampoo for dry hair, deep conditioner, heat protector spray & straighten carefully" :lol :lol

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The book is Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan, and it has some lovely thoughts about crocheting. Any crocheter would enjoy reading about how Esperanza first doesn't want to learn to crochet, but eventually it becomes very important to her. It will be easy to find at the library, used, or in bookstores.

 

I had never heard of this before I read the book, but I thought it was neat because I'd had the same thought while making baby blankets for my nieces! (maybe it was just wishful thinking, because my hair sheds and sticks a LOT, but I liked getting the justification...)

 

Thanks for the title of the book!

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In some of the versions of Tristan & Isolde, she sews her hair into a shirt she's making for him, and it's part of a sort of "love spell".

I've heard of that legend, too.

 

The book I was referring to is "Esperanza Rising" by Pam Munoz Ryan, for anyone who might want to check it out....it's set in the Great Depression era. I wondered if it was a cultural, historical thing, or maybe something that happened in the author's family, or something she just came up with.

hmmm.

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I have always thought that if anything I made anyone was at the scene of a crime then there would be plenty of my DNA on the scene...lol.

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Actually, I think it's kind of gross too. I always try to pull the hairs out but they usually snap (curly hair) some some of it is left in. My cousin was watching me crochet and I tried to pull a hair out but it snapped. i told her, "When I say I put myself into my work, I mean I put myself into my work!" We laughed about it. I just don't think it's possible to keep hair out of a big project especially if you have long hair.

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Thanks for the book titles. I've only read the first 2 of Debbie Macombers A Good Yarn series set in a yarn shop with knitting in the plot.

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IIRC that was a major point of interest in Diana's wedding gown. Each person who sewed on it got to sew a portion of the hem with their own hair.

 

 

 

Of course that would not seem to be an endorsement of the technique... we all know how that one worked out. :rofl

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sorry I never wrote back earlier, all...my pc was trying to earn a trip out the window, what with some sort of corrupted cookie, and who knows what all!!! That seems to be okay now. You were right, the book I was thinking of was "Esperanza Rising"...When I read of that "tradition" I wondered if it was cultural, historical, or something the author basically made up based on her experiences... but anyway...

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Thanks for the title. I'm taking my granddaughter to a literacy festival/book fair tomorrow and maybe they'll have it.

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