johnstowngirl

How do you frame a filet crochet piece?

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I made my first project in filet crochet - a set of initials for my sister and her brand-new husband. It looks great, but I don't know what to do with it now. Anybody have any suggestions? :think

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My suggestion is to take it to your local picture framer. But, I must admit, I'm biased that way as my parents own a framing gallery.

You can do it yourself, but it may be wiser to trust the first one to a pro to see how they do it.

Things to remember: Don't let the art touch the glass. Use acid free materials in framing. Framing, like crochet, can be expensive if done right, but should last many generations.

It mostly depends on if you have an edge to wrap around a backing board or not. If you have extra to go around a backing board, get stainless steel pins and pin it into the edge of foamcor. If not, then you would need to affix it somehow. I'm not sure. I would not suggest a spray adhesive or the like, as it is often not good for the fabric and also doesn't expand/contract with the art as the weather changes. I would actually suggest stitching it on with some matching thread. I'll have to ask my mother what she does with pieces like that, she's the expert.

 

Anyhow, that's my $0.02, and like I said, I'm biased towards going to a pro. (a local framer is actually about as expensive as going to Michael's or Joann's even with their 50% off cupons... don't believe me, take something into each for a quote... and usually much more highly trained and certified.)

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Wow Addey - I had no idea framing could be so complicated.

 

Here's what I do.

 

I buy a frame ($ store, walmart, wherever), I use Elmer's spray glue and glue fabric to the paper that comes with the frame because it's already the perfect size. The fabric becomes the background and matte. Then I either spray the back of the piece for a temporary bond or lay it out and let the backing and the glass hold it in place so I'm not actually gluing the filet, center it and put the frame back together.

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Yes, framing is an art and a science in many ways. My parents have owned their gallery since about 1990 and have actually attended school for it, as well as many, many, many seminars over the years to keep their certification. I only know a fraction of what they know.

Your way would work great Rose, except the glass touching the work.

Here's why I cringe at that. No mater what you do, there will always be some moisture in the framed piece. With the glass touching the work, the moisture (just ambient humidity) glues the piece to the glass. This means as weather changes, things can't move. Also, any good framer will tell you that whatever they do should be fully reversable. That is, if at any time, for any reason even 100 years from now, you can take it all apart without destroying the art and frame it new. (yes, your crochet is art, we tend to forget that from time to time...) The easiest way to keep the glass off the art is to use a mat (precut is fine... so long as it says it's acid free.)

I'll see my mom and dad today (we're going to Baltimore for my cousin's baby's Bris) and I'll ask what adhesive they suggest. I'm guessing that most adhesives sold for scrapbooking will be OK, since they've gotten very big into the acid free/conservation quality thing.

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I agree with you Addey - my parents make frames from Pennsylvania hardwoods that are absolutely GORGEOUS, but haven't found a place to sell them yet. They have framed lots of prints for me, as well as diplomas and the like, and my mom has mounted a cross-stitch piece, but never a crochet piece, so she is hesitant. I really want them to do it because I get to pick from beautiful woods like maple, curly maple (looks like wavy wood), black walnut, cherry, hickory, etc, which really sets the piece off nicely -- I just need to help her figure out how to mount the piece. If your mom has an idea, I would LOVE to hear it.

 

Thank you both for your thoughts -- now that sister #2 is engaged, I have to get started on her piece too! Depending on how the framing goes, maybe I'll post the picture!:D

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I've seen lace mounted by using spray on adhesive and then using matte boards to "lift" the glass off the lace.

 

I would have to back Addey's suggestion - go to a professional framer if you can.

 

Manda

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I never knew the fabric would glue itself to the glass. No wonder I love coming here - there's so much to learn.

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I'm glad I'm not the only one suggestiong to go to a pro.

I talked with my parents on the ride home from Daniel's Bris yesterday. They said that the glass touching something like crochet isn't as bad as if it was a water color or something, because the art itself won't transfer onto the glass. Still not great, but OK.

Mom's suggestion (she's the one that does about 99% of the mounting) is to either use quilter's thread and stitch it on to a backing board of some kind, or possibly an acid free glue, such as PVA which is really TackyGlue, to dab on tiny dots to hold down the piece. She thinks startching the piece with a very thinned down PVA wouldn't hurt the art and might even make mounting easier. (PVA = poly vinal acetate I believe... it's what's in TakckyGlue and I think Elmers GuleAll... white, water soluable, dries clear...)

I'm not sure if she's done any crochet mounting like this, but she's done tons of needlework and even some of that fine cut paper work.

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what I've done is press between cotten cloths and then just tack it to a peice of material that i want for the background so it is centered the way i like and if it does not fit a standard frame i have a frame made to fit.

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I have done a lot of crochet framing on my own and I have learned a lot since the first piece I framed over 15 years ago.

First, never starch the crochet piece, the starch will eventually eat the cotton thread, just wash the piece and block it to dry. Make sure the piece is completely dry before framing.

Second, don't use adhesives on your piece, I sew my crochet to the backing board. I use a T-pin to punch the holes in the board and then use color matching quilting thread to sew the piece on.

Third, use an acid free matting board for your backing board, you can get these at frame shops and hobby lobby.

Fourth, use spacers or a mat between your crochet piece and the glass. You don't want your crochet touching the glass.

As for the frames, I have bought frames from Wal-Mart and I have bought frames from frame shops when my pieces were odd sized. You can buy spacers or just make them from scrap acid free matting board.

The most important steps to do is the above first thru fourth, these will protect your crochet art.

I hope this helps.

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I have done a lot of crochet framing on my own and I have learned a lot since the first piece I framed over 15 years ago.

First, never starch the crochet piece, the starch will eventually eat the cotton thread, just wash the piece and block it to dry. Make sure the piece is completely dry before framing.

Second, don't use adhesives on your piece, I sew my crochet to the backing board. I use a T-pin to punch the holes in the board and then use color matching quilting thread to sew the piece on.

Third, use an acid free matting board for your backing board, you can get these at frame shops and hobby lobby.

Fourth, use spacers or a mat between your crochet piece and the glass. You don't want your crochet touching the glass.

As for the frames, I have bought frames from Wal-Mart and I have bought frames from frame shops when my pieces were odd sized. You can buy spacers or just make them from scrap acid free matting board.

The most important steps to do is the above first thru fourth, these will protect your crochet art.

I hope this helps.

 

I agree with you 100%. The only reason I said anything about 'startching' an item, was that I suggested using a thin PVA sollution, which is an acid free/ archival glue that won't eat your work. Blocking your piece before you attempt to frame it is a must!

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i had a piece framed at a local store. they stitched the piece into place and matted it how i liked. they also used spaces to ensure the glass was not directly on the filet piece.

 

nadine

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This is what I love about these boards, I learn something new all the time.

Addey, I have not heard about PVA solutions. Do you know where I can get one or learn more about them? I would like to try something like this.

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Thanks so much for all your advice. I'm framing my first crocheted piece today and I am very happy to have such good advice to follow.

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I have a sugestion... I used to do floral in a shop that also had a frame shop. So I used to watch closely while she did the fillets. It was quite interesting... She used NO glue or adhesive... But used t-pins and pinned it (the fillet) to a piece of matte board with foam core underneath (or something that you can stick a pin into. Then she after she had it pinned on the matte perfectly she would pick it up and take out one pin at a time and use a needle and thread... bring the needle up through the bottom of the hole the pin you just took out left, through the fillet and back down the same pin hole. And she continued to "tack" stitch it through all the holes that she had made to pin it out on the matte. And then she framed it. I don't remember her ever worrying about it touching the glass. Another great tip I learned from her about framing was how to put on a paper backing on a frame.... she used put a bead of glue around the back side of the frame... laid a piece of brown craft paper on it... pushing it down in order for it to bond to the frame... lightly spray with a water bottle.... it tightens up as the water dried and then take a piece of sand paper and lightly sand the paper by the back edge of the frame and it takes the paper off nice and even with your frame! Hope maybe some of this info will be helpful!

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