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How many of you knit as well as crochet?

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I used to know basic knitting and I'm thinking about taking it up again as well.

Have I lost my mind? :yes

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I don't like knitting. It may use less yarn but it takes more time. Just not for me. :hook Rules for me.

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I recently taught myself how to knit and like it quite a bit. It isn't that bad once you practice. Just like anything that your learning it takes time to build up speed. My favorite is still crochet, but knitting is a nice change of pace once in a while.

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i sorta try to knit. i can manage, just. crochet i can d whatever i please when it suits me. so to say i am a knitter is a bit far fetched, but i am a beginner i guess. where as crochet i'd be more inclined to say intermediate or something

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I've been trying to work up the courage to have another go at it, but I'm awfully happy with crochet. I'm sure I'll give in and learn eventually, though. :lol

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I think i am equally proficient in both. Crochet is quicker and chunkier; knitting takes longer but is a finer, thinner product. Lately I am doing a bit of knitting. I didn't enjoy the process at first; but loved the finished products. Also, as I improved, I picked up speed. I don't do anything intricate, but I can make doll garments and people shrugs and blankets in knit. Keep at it and see if it is for you.

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I put down my knitting for years, but learning to crochet brought back my enthusiasm for knitting. Now I do and love both.

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I enjoy both but arthritis in my right shoulder from an old injury makes knitting more difficult. That extra motion of wrapping the yarn around the knitting needle takes a lot more shoulder movement. I probably have more knitting needles than crochet hooks, more knitting pattern books but about equal WIP's.

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My mom taught me how to knit when I was just a little kid. When I was a teenager, I learned to crochet and taught my mom. I can knit, and sometimes do for things like shawls, but I don't particularly enjoy it. It takes way too long and I hate weaving in ends. I much prefer crocheting. :)

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I'm a beginning knitter, and like it a lot. It's a nice change of pace from crochet, but I like crochet much, much better.

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I do both. But I mainly knit to make socks. I love knitting socks. I may knit a garment every now and then if it's something that just can't be duplicated in crochet.

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I do both but tend to do all of one craft at a time. Right now I'm back into a crochet fix which may take years to kick! I love the almost instant gratification of the patterns in crocheting whereas in knitting I really need to work quite a ways before any pattern emerges. But I do admit I'm less "bored" with straight knitting than I am with straight single crochet. Maybe because there's less carpal-tunnel repetition?

 

But I do know this: my grandmother was mostly crochet and tatting and my mother was almost all knitting. I think we all fall primarily one way or the other in preference.

 

Push come to shove, I'd choose crochet!

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I enjoy both but arthritis in my right shoulder from an old injury makes knitting more difficult. That extra motion of wrapping the yarn around the knitting needle takes a lot more shoulder movement.

 

The continental method of knitting is easier on the shoulders.

 

I had learned to knit as a child but was taught to knit and throw my yarn different than what is most common today. When I tried to change I found it very difficult. All of a sudden I would be knitting the way I was taught not the 'correct' way. :eek Another crocheter I know, mentioned that the continental method was easier to learn since you hold the yarn similar to crochet. :hook So I taught myself how to knit using the continental method and found that it's faster.

 

I also taught a coworker who had bursitis in her shoulder and couldn't knit because of it. She enjoys knitting again. There are on line sites that show you how to knit using the continental method. It does take practice though. :yes

 

With all that said, I still prefer crochet to knitting! :lol

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The continental method of knitting is easier on the shoulders.

 

I had learned to knit as a child but was taught to knit and throw my yarn different than what is most common today. When I tried to change I found it very difficult. All of a sudden I would be knitting the way I was taught not the 'correct' way. :eek Another crocheter I know, mentioned that the continental method was easier to learn since you hold the yarn similar to crochet. :hook So I taught myself how to knit using the continental method and found that it's faster.

 

I also taught a coworker who had bursitis in her shoulder and couldn't knit because of it. She enjoys knitting again. There are on line sites that show you how to knit using the continental method. It does take practice though. :yes

 

With all that said, I still prefer crochet to knitting! :lol

Yesterday I watched that wonderful Greer Garson/Walter Pigeon movie about Mrs. Minever and in it she's knitting and I think this is what you're talking about ... the continental way ... I was fascinated and want to learn!

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I love to knit! I am a crocheter first but about 12 years ago I taught myself to knit. I have to confess that for the last several years I have knitted more than crocheted. :blush But I always come back to crochet, there is just nothing else like it.

 

I have always wondered why ALL knitters/crocheters don't make it a point to learn both skills. I knit Continental (also English if I want to) and one advantage of being a crocheter is that it is much easier to learn Continental knitting. You control the yarn with your left hand, and the motions of going into a stitch and "scooping" the yarn to make your knit stitch are very similar to the movements of crocheting.

 

You'd be surprised how many knitters can't for the life of themselves figure out how to make a single crochet edging (common in knitting patterns). They just freeze up when they see "crochet"! :)

 

I love both and appreciate each skill for what it has to offer. Just like I would never crochet socks or gloves (face it, it will never equal knitting) I would also never knit a doily (yes, it can be done...but why?)

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I once learned the knit stitch, but couldn't get the purl stitch so I gave up.

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I also do both, but much prefer crochet for all the above mentioned reasons. Years ago I learned the Continental method of knitting which I find much easier than the traditional way. I can really only do the knit and purl stitches for scarves and slippers.

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I enjoy both knitting and crochet, and love combining them in projects when I can. I tend to get carpal tunnel problems in my wrists, so it's beneficial for me to alternate between knitting and crochet to vary the movements I'm making.

 

I became comfortable with knitting before really learning crochet. I think that if I had learned crochet first, I may not have ever learned to knit since crochet progresses so much faster and is easier to work with when you make mistakes (IMHO, it is soooo much easier to rip out crochet to the exact stitch you want than to knit backwards or frog entire rows at a time!). Other things I love :manyheart about crochet: Dropping a hook doesn't usually mean any work is lost. Slip a knitting needle and you can loose all your live stitches! :eek Also, crochet is easier on my pocketbook - a few hooks are cheaper than all sorts of straight, circular, double-pointed needles in various sizes and lengths.

 

Before I learned to crochet, I could not do Continental knitting. After learning crochet, Continental knitting suddenly worked for me - like others here mentioned - you hold the yarn in your left hand just like in crochet! So, crochet has actually helped my knitting skills, too. :yay

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I've just started to teach myself to knit. I will say that learning to crochet first was a good thing for me... I learned the "mechanics" of working with yarn quite well with crochet. I'm enjoying the knitting, but since I'm new to it, I'm kinda like a trainwreck with it... an awful big mess. :lol I'll get it eventually. It isn't hard - I'm just clumsy.

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Hi Sarasara, I'm new here too. I am delighted to find someone else who really does do both knitting and crocheting. I go back and forth between the knitting and the crochet forums and I am surprised how few people are "fluent" in both.

 

I'm totally with you about combining techniques on projects. A knitted ribbing on a crocheted garment, for example, is superior to any slip stitched crochet "ribbing". And a crocheted collar or edging on a knitted garment is quicker, easier, and more attractive than trying to knit something similar.

 

I do agree with you that crocheting is faster. It is so much fun to crochet doilies and lace edgings. And making novelty items like dolls, ornaments, accessories, flower motifs, etc are so much easier in crochet. It is MUCH easier to correct a mistake in crochet, that's for sure.

 

I also agree with you about the tools of the trade for knitting. You can go broke trying to buy straight, double pointed and circulars in all the different sizes and lengths that you need. But I do enjoy the challenge of knitting. With the finer gauge, although it takes longer, you get much more detail and exact fit. Crochet can never match the drape and elasticity of knitting for certain garments.

 

After learning knitting, I really doubled my fun. I have knitted and crocheted just about every kind of project you can think of from the finest thread doilies to Fair Isle sweaters. I love it all.

 

(Strangely, though, there is one technique that I loathe and despise....and that is tunisian crochet. I absolutely HATE it!!)

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I learned to crochet November 2005 and knit May 2007. I really love both the are great and I find both crochet and knit relaxing. I am working on a knitted coffee Mitt I will give it to my Sister because I don't drink coffee. I think she has a coffee mug of not I might buy one for her to go with the coffee mitt.

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