Jump to content
KnicKnac

What Style Do You Knit?

What Style Do You Knit?  

177 members have voted

  1. 1. What Style Do You Knit?

    • Continental
      85
    • Throw Over
      77
    • Other
      15


Recommended Posts

The Knitting Fiend has a series of articles on Eastern/Western crossed/uncrossed knitting here. It's pretty interesting for those who enjoy learning about the technical side of knitting.

 

Linda Y

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:) I just finished knitting lessons and my teacher taught me English throw over...I think. At least it sounds like it from the conversations here. Is continental easier? Or is one way better than the other? :think

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:) Is continental easier? Or is one way better than the other? :think

 

I'm not there yet but knowing continental is supposed be easier when doing two color work.

 

By the way, I cast on and have done three rows so far on the Harry Potter Scarf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not there yet but knowing continental is supposed be easier when doing two color work.

 

By the way, I cast on and have done three rows so far on the Harry Potter Scarf.

 

:) I'll have to give Continental a try then. I have a learn to knit book from my class.

 

I'm a huge Harry Potter fan. I can't wait to see your scarf!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a throw-over gal. Just can't get used to the continental. Don't know why?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knit English (throwing). I find it easier and more natural.

 

It was a little awkard crocheting at first, because I had to carry my yarn with the other hand, but now I can easily knit and crochet with yarn in opposite hands.

 

I'm curious about the other people who knit English - did you learn to knit before you learned to crochet? I suspect people who learned to crochet first are more likely to be continental knitters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Continental FTW (that's "for the win", a bit of World of Warcraft lingo I picked up from my friends :D)

 

I first tried the British method but it didn't work for me. My roomate who taught me the purl stitch swore she would hold one needle under her armpit and knit without looking. For me, Continental works because the way the yarn is held is the same as in crochet. It's fast and efficient, although I still need to keep an eye on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knit English style and throw. Just can't seem to feel comfortable or get the hang of knitting continental, althought I would really like to learn how to knit this way since it does seem to be faster and easier on your hands and arms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having tried and failed numerous times the "throw method" I finally said I was through with that and promptly threw that idea out of the window. (There was A LOT of throwing and very little knitting at first, can't you tell?)

I went back to knitting a few months later after a friend told me to go to a website and learn the continental method (which had not been described in the book I tried to learn from.) Because of years of crocheting, this clicked for me. I still have trouble meeting guage (my stitches are too tall), so I may experiment with combination if it will fix that problem and simply use continental for knitting in the round.

But in the end, I think you should knit however it works for you and whatever you find comfortable and enjoyable. This is too much of a beautiful craft to turn into a chore. :c9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New to knitting and havent really picked up a needle (chicken I guess) What is the difference AND what is easier!! :huh Thanks Diane :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dniece:

 

The easiest way to explain the different methods is for you to see them demonstrated.

 

Go to www.knittinghelp.com. Click on basic techniques, then Knit. Click on the Pink video icon to see how to knit with the continental method then on the Blue video icon to see the english (throw over) method.

 

I have never tried the continental method although it looks like it would be faster. The english method is what I learned with and it pretty easy to do.

 

If I were you, I'd just try learning with both methods and see which one is more comfortable/natural feeling for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dneice, just an addendum to disneypal's note. The first videos do contrast continental vs. English, but the only difference betweent hese two is how you hold the yarn--left or right hand. Scroll down to see her videos of combined knitting and other techniques, which actually form the stitches differently. In combined (which I do), your knit and purl stitches actually 'face' different directions because you made them differently. In American /English knitting, regardless of which hand holds the yarn, the stitches face the same direction on the needle. American patterns (most of what you'll find on the web and in books) are written for English 'throw' style knitting, so even though I can't knit that way, I'd recommend you learn that style. (Then you don't have to translate patterns into your style.) It doesn't matter whether you hold the yarn in your left or right hand--that's just whatever's more comfortable for you.

 

But for me to follow a pattern and have the right side the same as the pattern calls for, I sometimes have to either untwist my stitch or use a different stitch. For example, I just made a shawl. To get the proper right-hand and left-hand decreases to make a triangle, I have to SSK when the pattern calls for a K2TOG, and vice versa.

 

I don't want to confuse you, but there's abslutely no difference involved in how you create the stitches if you knit continental--you're simply holding the yarn in your left hand instead of the right. But there are many other ways to knit, and knittinghelp's videos show some of these different styles that are unfamiliar to most western knitters. Me, I want to try that Norwegian style. My friend T was so disappointed to learn that she didn't knit differently from everyone else just because she knits Continental (she wanted to be special).

 

But before I learn something else new, I'd better get better at knitting to begin with! :lol Patty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, after much failed attempts at the Continental Method, I have decided that the 'Throw Method' is much better for me. I can get a consistent tension throughout.

 

Krystal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I learned to knit throw over (yarn in right hand). Taught myself continnental a few years ago. Now I actually switch styles often --- sometimes in mid row!

It seems to keep the repetitive movement stress down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do Continental and combined. I mostly do continental unless I have long purl rows then I will do the combined purl and then if I have to knit into it I go through the back loop.

 

I have no problem knitting in the round as long as I pay attention to what I'm doing and how my loops lay on the needle.

 

But I have been known to revert to the English throw over if my hands are getting tired and my fingers on my left hand need a break.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:cheer :cheer :cheerI'm so excited!!!!!! I learned the Continental method yesterday and I love it! It feels so natural. :cheer :cheer :cheer

 

Now I'm making my first tank top combining two threads. I feel like I'm moving up in the world!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do throw over method. It 's easy for me to hold onto the needles while I look at the tv or friends signing back to me.

 

I can do continental. It feel easier and faster but I need more control over my needles as I can get distracted easily by things around me. I don't find any reason to do continental yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a "picker". I just can't get the hang of "throwing".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night, I just discovered that I can do all three - english, contiential and combination. It 's kinda fun. It prevent my hands from being cramped when I work on a project for a long period.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello! :waving I've been booted at least seven times tonight, so hopefully I can type this fast enough and then sign out for the night!

I am a Continental knitter, although I use my left thumb to help make the purl stitch vs. the middle left finger as seen on the video mentioned above. I learned how to knit a year before I learned how to crochet. I only had a short time of learning how to knit and didn't have a teacher after the class was over. :no But my Mom taught me how to crochet the following year, and I could ask her to help me where I needed it. :hook I just started knitting again a few years ago and have pushing myself to learn more and more, in between my crocheting and sewing projects and attending college! :knit

It's GREAT having a KNITTING forum here! :clap I just found it last night and am SO GEEKED! In fact, I already joined the KAL for the rectangle shawl and even went out to get the right size larger needles to get it going and even though I already have another knitted prayer shawl going in the triangle shape! :yes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried for years to learn to knit, and it just didn't click until a few months ago when someone pointed me in the direction of Continental.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried for years to learn the "Throw Over" method, but just could not get it to work.

 

I finally stubbled on "Continental" and the light bulb finally came on.

 

I can do combination knitting, and I have used the throw over method on a fair isle hat . . . but it was very slow going. Worth it in the long run to avoid twisting the yarn though.

 

I love to learn new techniques, even if it ends up not working well for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I taught myself to knit from a book. The continental was the only way that made sense to me because the yarn is held in the left hand. I taught myself to crochet first...so this seemed the natural way to hold the yarn to me. I think for me the English style would cause too much shoulder pain. I can knit pretty fast with the continental and it goes smoothly for me at least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just learned to knit in May and I am a thrower. The lady that taught me to knit taught me that way however she can to both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...