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Both. I've crocheted off and on since about '73, but always wanted to knit, too. I tried to learn knitting many times but about a year ago said, OK Carla, you learned you crochet from a book, you CAN learn to knit from one, too. I pretty exclusively knitted until my crochet "mojo" took back over. I've made a number of knitted dishrags, a baby blanket, a lovely stole for myself and... what else? Several knit caps for children. A drawstring bag... I started to learn knitted lace, but crochet stepped back in, LOL. I am longing for my needles again though, so I need to plan a knitting project soon.

 

I knit several different styles but like Combination best. You pick the yarn rather than throw it. But the purl in Combination isn't exactly Continental but rather Eastern European and is also called Islamic. The Combination purl twists the stitch so you knit Continental through the back loop to untwist. Fast and easy.

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I'm learning to knit, and like a lot of peeps here, I do Continental. It's much easier for a hooker to do Continental, I think.

 

Throwing just confused the heck out of me; using the needle to pick the yarn makes more sense to me.

 

I'm not very good or fast yet, though.

 

I'm trying to make a dishcloth, and I keep screwing it up and unlike crochet, I have to unravel the whole thing to get back to the mistake.

 

But, there are some very pretty knitted shawls I want to make for summer that are much more lightweight than crocheted shawls, and then there are knit socks I want to make, too, so I better figure this thing out. Sigh.

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I do both also. I learned to crochet when I was around 7 or so. My mother tried to teach me how to knit around the same time, but she wasn't too successful. She tried to teach me right handed.....I'm a leftie. So, I crocheted exclusivly for years. When my Mom died 6 years ago I took all of her knitting needles. I took a knitting class at our local art center. The teacher taught us all to knit continental.....it is very similar to the crochet motion. I found in relativly easy to learn....now I am obsessivly knitting. Socks are just so much nicer when they are knitted!

 

Knittinghelp.com is a great web site to learn. They have videos of knitting both english and continental. It really isn't that hard!

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I learned crochet and knit about the same time from books and websites. I found crochet was easier for me to learn but it didn't take me that much longer to learn knitting. One thing about using websites is to remember that there is alot of different ways to knit so websites may show slightly different ways to make a knit or purl stitch. This kind of threw me off at first. I knew about Continental and English but there is more than that ( I think someone here mentioned Combination). Knitting Help is a good website as it tells you about at least three different ways to knit.

 

Knitting does go slower than crochet since you get a smaller stitch (than a single crochet) when comparing equalivant size needles and hooks. Also whether knitting or crochet will hurt your hands more will depend on your style and how tight you knit or crochet.

 

For me right now I probably like knit and crochet about equally.

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I knit as well. I am a self taught english knitter.

I actually started with combination until my whole family kep telling me I was knitting backwards, then I found out the Annie Modesett says it is not wrong just different lol.

I dont favor one or the other. just what ever mood stikes me at that time

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I have two sets of needles, and have tried and tried and tried to teach myself. I would LOVE to learn to knit. But my hands, I sappose, are SO used to crochet, its like trying to write with my left hand. It just doesn't work for me. But if I could ever get used to it, and master it, I would probably knit like a fiend. I "understand" how to knit, and get the concept. But my hands just won't cooperate. It's just too cumbersome feeling. **sigh** I hope to over come it some day.

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I find crochet to be much more "forgiving" in the patterns. You can hide mistakes so much better. :))

 

Something to think about too is that crochet takes up more yarn to make something than knitting does. And yes, knitting is much slower.

 

I definately prefer crochet. But sometimes I'll pick up some knitting needles too.

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Wow, there are so many multi-talented people on here! I am amazed!

 

I checked a couple of books out of the library, and looked at knittinghelp.com, and I think I've got the basics...casting on and the knit stitch, at any rate. And last night my 10 yo dd wanted to do it, and she caught on in a snap! I was astounded! I have tried to teach her to crochet on several occasions, and she quickly got very frustrated with it. I think maybe because tension is so important in crochet, if you don't have the tension just right (esp. when learning!), it just doesn't work. Knitting, to me, seems to initially be more forgiving that way. I have done a few rows of the knitting, it's not too pretty, but I think I understand the concept now. :knit Sad to say, it also bothers my elbow tendinitis. :(

 

I will NOT be giving up crocheting, however! :lol That is something I actually feel "successful" at doing! :hook

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I do both, and did learn knitting first when I was 6, but didn't pick it up again until in my 40s. I learned to crochet when I was 17. Everyone here makes good points on the 2. Crochet goes faster, way faster. towards completing a project, due to the openness of the stitches. Knitting is much more fine a fabric and takes longer. When knitting, it is good to learn both english and continental methods...they both come in handy depending on the project pattern. There are a wealth of resources online, and even animated "classes" for free. At first, knitting will be awkward, especially when one is used to crochet. With continental method, tho, it is similar to crochet for right handed in that you hold the yarn in your left hand. The easiest way to learn to knit is with a starter project on large needles with a heavier weight yarn. Perhaps even a boucle or textured nubby yarn...thereby your mistakes will be well hidden and you won't be discouraged by your progress. Secondly, work it in knit only, which is garter stitch. Forget about learning how to purl until your second project. Reason being, it is harder to purl than it is to knit, and it is a challenge to get your tension right when working knit a row/purl a row. Your scarf (or potholder or dishcloth) first project will be just fine in garter stitch and a nubby yarn and it will assist you in "getting the hang of it" before you move on to project 2. Crochet is much more forgiving in your skill level; knitting will show your inexperience, so practice, practice, practice. Also, if you're lucky enough to have a person teach you, it is also a good suggestion to simply have them cast on for you...and you start knitting each row from there. This is how I taught my 11 y/o niece, and she picked it up quite quickly. There are many varied methods of casting on and it is good to know a few of them, and you can learn them after your first project. Casting off is relatively easy, and if you don't quite get the hang of it, you can crochet it off the needle to finish it, something you already know how to do! Don't be discouraged and definitely seek out other knitters who can give you some tips and instruction. P.S. you can get very creative and original in combining the two!

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Since we're talking knitting here, may I ask a pointy stick related question?

 

I'm making a dishcloth, and I'm knitting on to cast on (I think it looks better than the long-tail cast on, which when I do it is never even). My instructions say to knit my first 5 rows. However, when I knit the first row, it doesn't look right. Should I purl the first row so it fits the garter stitch pattern?

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I'm just getting into knitting, just finished first socks - they are excellent & I keep looking at them amazed I made them!

I like both, wanted to learn to knit as I think a nice flat fabric can work better than crochet for some items as I also think there are times when only crochet will work.

Plus you can never really have enough skills.

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I have crocheted all my life.....learned when very young......and love it. Always have something going and a take along bag. But I did want to learn to knit too and did that later in life; so it isn't as easy, because the crochet comes naturally now. But I stick with it and have made some things I like. I think if I did it more I would be more comfortable with it, but there is always that crochet hook in my hand. :hook I do like working with the circular knitting needles.

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I learned when I was very young to crochet and knit. I didn't do anything with that until years later. Then I retaught myself how to crochet and haven't stopped since.

I also retaught myself how to knit but again didn't do anything. I did that a couple of different times. I'm currently brushing up on it and even bought a book.

I've found a few easy patterns that I hope to do soon and of course a couple hard ones that I hope to do someday.

I guess since I learned both at the same time and so young, about 10 or 11, that I find them both easy. Well haven't gotten into anything too difficult with knitting yet so it's easy enough. lol

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A knitted cast-on will be stretchy, if I remember right, Tiga. Is that what is happening? Is your cast-on stretched out? Long-tail is plenty stretch for a cotton dishcloth. Cable cast-on isn't as stretchy but a bit firmer. I used it for a bath rug. There must be at least 30 ways to cast on, but I know only these three. Take at look at this article on Knitty. It has some explanations of how these basic cast-ons work. Also look here for several sets of instructions and some explanation far better than I can do.

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my mom taught me a couple stitches in crochet when i was about ten, i think. i made a blanket for my cat (i don't think it was originally supposed to be for the cat, i just got lazy and didn't feel like making it bigger and the cat ended up sleeping on it so i "gave" it to him), and didn't pick upa hook for about 9 years. i just started again last summer, and i've been addicted ever since. then i kept hearing that knitting was easier, and it felt like i was kind of dared to try it lol. i wanted to see how different it was and if it really was easier. it took me a few days to learn the 2 stitches and how to hold the needles, and at first i was soo slow lol it took FOREVER to make a scarf that would've taken a night or two in crochet.

 

for a while, i was torn between the two, i really couldn't decide which i liked better because i liked how both turned out. but i think i am truly a crocheter. i have more faith in my crochet ability. with knitting, i need a pattern or at least some sort of guidance. and the increasing and decreasing in knitting drives me insane. there's so many different ways and if you do the wrong one you can screw the whole thing up. and i was so careful never to drop a stitch cuz i had NO idea how to fix it other than to unravel the entire thing and start over.

 

i like crochet =)

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.... when I knit the first row, it doesn't look right. Should I purl the first row so it fits the garter stitch pattern?

 

Tiga, I would do as the directions read and knit the first 5 rows. If you choose to purl the first row, however, you're going to have to purl the last row too, then you're going to have to decide to cast OFF in purl or in knit, so you have a different dilemma. It is a small project, so I would make one and call it a prototype. If you're not happy with it, you can decide to change up the next one, or go with a different pattern altogether. The other thing about crochet vs. knit is that with crochet, you're more free to create as you go....with knitting, you pretty much have to have a schematic to reach the end properly. Good luck with the project. D

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My mom taught me to crochet when I was little - don't remember exact age, but probably 7-8. I've been crocheting on and off most of my life. When those fun fur scarves became all the rage a couple of years ago, I decided if the rest of the world can knit there's no reason I can't do it too. Oh my!!! It was so incredibly painful! LOL It was SO SLOW!! I was so tense while trying to get these two needles to work together, I would be exhausted afterward. When my girlfriend mentioned that her mom had given up on knitting these scarves and was now crocheting them, I threw those needles down faster than you can blink! Picking up my hook (it had been years since I had crocheted) felt like coming home! LOL That renewed my love for crocheting. After a year or so, I decided to give knitting another try. It really bugged me that I let it beat me, ya know? Plus, it bugged me that if I saw a pattern a really liked I would have to put it back b/c it was knit instead of crochet. So I struggled and struggled and swore and swore ... (btw, the continental style felt more comfortable for me too) ... and practiced and practiced. Eventually, I started feeling more comfortable with TWO needles instead of one hook. I practiced by making a lot of dish and wash cloths and scarves.

 

I can now say I do both knit and crochet and enjoy them both. I usually have a project of each going so my hand and arm gets a bit of a break from the same repetitive motion. I have knit quite a few purses and totes, ponchos, and did several afghans for Xmas. I haven't gotten into the lace knitting, but it's so beautiful that it's on my to do list. And yes, knitting is slower (even though I have gotten faster) but I enjoy the process and result so much that it doesn't bother me any more.

 

So here's a vote to keep trying. Like some of the others have said, it will eventually click.

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Hi Rascal:

 

I taught myself to crochet and to knit; however, as far as my crochet skills went, I could only really do a chain, but once I learned to knit then the lightbulb went off with the crochet (don't ask me to explain it). Anyway, I found a cd called Knitting Made Easy by Coats & Clark. They sell it at AC Moore and I'm sure other places. That might help you move beyond the basics. It has a close up of someone doing the different stitches, casting on, binding off, etc. You can rewind and fast forward, etc. It even has some patterns on it.

 

Hope that helps.

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Well, I put the &$%*! dishcloth down, and now I'm knitting an "easy" shawl for my mom. It actually IS easy, and it involves a very simple sort-of lace thingy - I have to yo every once in a while (totally had to figure out which way to yo properly - duh), so it's a bit more interesting to do than your basic k k k k k k k all the way across.

 

It's still excruciatingly slow, though. But it is creating a very soft fabric and it's lightweight, which we need in Florida in the summer.

 

I did finally figure out the main difference between knit and crochet - knitting is strictly 2 dimensional, even when you are doing "in the round" - you are still making a flat piece of fabric. It's more akin to weaving. Crocheting is totally 3 dimensional. Our stitches are 3D; we can sculpt with our yarn; we can create height and width and depth; we could decided to crochet vertically off a base if we wanted to - might need wire to stand up, but we could do it.

 

Crochet is more like working with clay, really.

 

The more I think about it, the less crochet and knitting actually have in common, other than yarn.

 

But I like them both. Knitting is starting to grow on me (like mold? or a fungus? :D ).

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I learned to crochet when I was little (my grandma taught me), never found it hard at all.

But a couple of month ago I decided to learn to knit (interested in the cable stitch mostly). I sign up in my local Michaels for a class and let me tell you, the first couple of classes I was so frustrated, I found it so hard, but because I had set me a goal to learn I wasn't going to give up that easily.

After looking up everything about knitting, books & websites, and going to a couple of classes I got the hang of it, and now I'm into it, but THERE'S NOTHING LIKE CROCHET!!!:hook I still wouldn't give up my crochet, it rules!!:yarn

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I did learn to knit and crochet (well crochet and knit chronologically) when I was a child so maybe that is why I don't understand why knitting is such a challenge.

 

Once you get the concept in :knit and :hook that you are pulling yarn through a loop, it doesn't seem like it should be so hard.

 

I did teach myself Continental style knitting about a year ago and it is faster than the English throw method but it is also more difficult for some of the tricky stuff you do with knitting. (like k4togTBL :eek )

 

For Tiga, you might want to try doing a seed st border instead of the garter st. Seed st involves putting a knit over a purl and vice versa and makes a very pretty border. I find garter st to be rather ungainly but seed (or moss) stitch is neater in some way.

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I was shown the basic granny square and from there I taught myself. It was very, very frustrating for me at times. I didn't know of anyone else who could crochet. Now I know alot more than I ever thought I would and love it. Now knitting is a bit different for me, lol. I know the basics and have a ton of scarves that I knitted. I taught myself mostly and that too was frustrating, lol. I have made a couple other things, but I prefer crocheting. There are so much more you can make and it goes by alot quicker.

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I know knitting and purling, that's it. I can make dishcloths and scarves lol.

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I learned to crochet about 10 years ago, when I was 19. My husband and I had just moved, I didn't know anybody, and I was having a rough pregnancy. I decided that maybe I could learn to knit or crochet, so I could keep myself occupied and maybe make stuff for the baby, too.

 

I picked up crochet pretty quickly, and decided after a month or so to get the learn to knit book too. I could not figure it out for the life of me, and my father-in-law mentioned that his mother used to knit. Next time we saw her, she tried and tried to teach me but I just didn't get it.

 

After my daughter was born, I stopped crocheting, but picked it up again around '04 or '05. I was pretty happy with what I was able to do, but I still liked the fabric you could get by knitting. I don't know what clicked this time around, but I was able to teach myself off the same book I used way back when.

 

I'm still a better crocheter than I am a knitter, though I can do basic knitted sweaters, socks, cables, simple lace. I can't say I prefer one over the other; I'm definitely glad I can do both. (Well, sort of do both, anyway.)

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