Natasha

Does anyone use the "Elmore method"?

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[FONT=Comic Sans MS][SIZE=3][COLOR=darkslateblue]:clap I recently acquired both of William Elmore's booklets on how to crochet easier and less expensively and was wondering if anyone here has actually made anything using any or all of his techniques and method. What do you think of it? [/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

[FONT=Comic Sans MS][SIZE=3][COLOR=darkslateblue]After reviewing :book the booklets, I'm having a little trouble seeing how it's:[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

[FONT=Comic Sans MS][SIZE=3][COLOR=darkslateblue]1. Easier -- It's a whole new language to learn :eek that is only partially based on common crochet terms; and [/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

[FONT=Comic Sans MS][SIZE=3][COLOR=darkslateblue]2. Cheaper -- This is never explained except to say, "You will use less yarn." Less yarn may be used, but I can't see that it would be more than a few yards. Maybe I'm missing something. :think [/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

[FONT=Comic Sans MS][SIZE=3][COLOR=darkslateblue]However, the finished projects in the booklets are beautifully done (there is an awesome joining method I can't wait to try :c9 ), and I'm sure it's because he had a different way of doing things and not just because he was a good stitcher, which he obviously was. :yes [/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

[FONT=Comic Sans MS][SIZE=3][COLOR=darkslateblue]Any thoughts? :hook [/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

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It sounds interesting.

I was discussing with my friend last night about how much less yarn knitting uses compared to crochet. Using less yarn, in any amount to get the same product is always a good thing!

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I have both of the Elmore books too. I haven't had a chance to sit down and try his methods yet. Sure looks interesting. :dog

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I also have both books and use some of his methods quite often. Depending on the stitches used you do use less yarn.

 

This tutorial at Crochet Me is similar to one of the methods used in the Elmore Method. http://www.crochetme.com/linked-stitch-tutorial .

 

I believe this book

Top Technique & Special Stitch Afghans in Crochet (Hardcover) by Deborah Levyhamburg has an afghan done with the Elmore method in it but of course I can't find my copy to confirm this.

 

Keep us posted on how you use the Elmore method.

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The linked stitch is really neat!!!!!!!!! I'll have to find something to make and really check it out! thanx!

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Wow that stitch is really neat. I'll have to try it out. I'm surprised I've never heard of it before.

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I have the "More Elmore" book but haven't worked on anything using the technique.

 

Emily - Thanks for mentioning the book "Top Technique & Special Stitch Afghans in Crochet"! I just pulled it off my shelf and flipped through it - a good variety of crochet techniques and pretty projects. I didn't see anything that referred to "Elmore" method, but maybe the book uses a different description for the same technique.

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I've played a little with the "no-chain" foundations from More Elmore, but that's about it. I do like a modified version of his two color "hoist-on" foundation for doing crochet with a double-ended hook.

 

For those who are wondering, he's got a bunch of stitches that he calls "Elmore stitches." Some crochet books use them, calling them "extended stitches," which preserves his abbreviation without referencing him.

 

To be honest, I've never seen the first book. Where did you get yours?

 

Oh, does anyone have any suggestions for a better name for his afghan stitch equivalent of the knitters "cast-on"?

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Where did you get the books? Have they been re-printed? They belong to the group of books that are well known but out of print like many of the classic crocheting books.

 

I think it really comes down to what kind of a crocheter are you? Some people really like having all different ways of doing stitches while others like to play with colour etc. I just find crochet in general really interesting and like the historical aspect of it all.

 

I have been wanting the Elmore books for a while.

 

Rachel

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Huh, these look really interesting. I like the way that the linked treble stitch looked in the link.

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:clap I recently acquired both of William Elmore's booklets on how to crochet easier and less expensively and was wondering if anyone here has actually made anything using any or all of his techniques and method. What do you think of it?

 

After reviewing :book the booklets, I'm having a little trouble seeing how it's:

 

1. Easier -- It's a whole new language to learn :eek that is only partially based on common crochet terms; and

 

2. Cheaper -- This is never explained except to say, "You will use less yarn." Less yarn may be used, but I can't see that it would be more than a few yards. Maybe I'm missing something. :think

 

However, the finished projects in the booklets are beautifully done (there is an awesome joining method I can't wait to try :c9 ), and I'm sure it's because he had a different way of doing things and not just because he was a good stitcher, which he obviously was. :yes

 

Any thoughts? :hook

I'm trying to find out how to do the Elmore hoist-on thing. Would you describe mind describing that? I saw an old post of yours in which you give your opinion of Elmore's techniques.

 

David

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I am working on the Crochet Your Way learn how to crochet afghan which is a 20 block sampler. Block 2 uses different variations of the extended single crochet stitch, which the book calls "double single crochet stitch" or dsc. This book is the only place i have seen it referred to that way. Donna Kooler's Encyclopedia of Crochet does a good job of covering variations of the stich and how it can make a wave smoother. The Crochet Your Way book points out that the extended single crochet stitch is a good in-between stitch when single crochet is too tight and half-double crochet is too bumpy.

 

I'm all for squeezing the most out of crochet! The Elmore books are OOP (out of print) and pretty hard to find. Hold on to 'em!

 

and for anyone who wants to know, you can try this stich by starting a single crochet stich but adding one extra chain before you pull through the last two loops.

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The no chain method is something like what nana taught me when doing filet crochet doilies that are shaped and not just a square or rectangle.

I find I like trying the different methods and then having the option of using it or not.

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