Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I was trying to imagine what this would be like so I just did what I thought may be right from the directions and from other observations we have posted.

 

I am working with Peach as my CA and a White as my CB

 

I made a chain of about 18 st. ( I ended up with 15 dc spaces)

 

With Peach, I did (dc, ch1) across working in the front loop only.

 

I added my white and did dc across working in the available back loop only.

 

Both of my colours are now working from my Peach chain.

 

Next rows:

I collected my peach strand again and did the intertwining of the two colours then worked across with a dc in every stitch working in what is the front loop of the piece - the loop was actually at the back but it is the Front Face of my piece. Dropped the peach and went back to the white.

 

I made sure my stuff was connected when I did my start then...

I worked my white stitches in both loops of my white row below PLUS that remaining loop of the peach.

 

My stitches are now connected in those beginning exchanges of strands and in every stitch across a row. This would be a very secure and warm stitch.

 

If anyone else does this, did I get it right? It sure seems like what people said it should.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick bump before we are lost in the oblivion of page two... a fate worse than frogging :eek:lol

 

Did any one else try this. i am curious now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I pulled the afghan I 've got out of it's storage bag (it's been a while since I've looked at it. It was done all in dc, ch1, dc. The fron is squares of blue grey and white. The back is solid white. It is not joined on every stitch or every row. It looks like the front (squares) was done first then the back was crocheted into place all in one piece joining around every square as it progressed (hope I'm explaining this right) THis may not be cleeking but I've never seen an afghan constructed like this. I'll try to get the pic posted today and hopefull you can see what I'm talking about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oooh, head hurty. need to see pictures...

 

:rofl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Snorlie latchets,,,,,my NEW word!! Tytyty,,,,,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must include snorlie latchets in my vocabulary now.

 

I am wondering if you guys are talking about crochet done with a double-ended hook (often referred to as crochenit...). It can also look very double sided. Like the reversible ghans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a pattern for double sided potholder that went "around" but stayed flat. Sounds like what Tracey described. The scarf thing sounds intersting. I'll have to try it.

Ellie 13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yay! I found detailed instructions! It took me 4 months, but here it is (that is, if anyone's still interested). I don't know how much longer this site will be available, so print it up while you can!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be interested, it sounds intriguing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I am going to have to try this. Looks rather interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the a fore mentioned magazine. According to this article, it is not double ended crochet. I didn't understand why cleeking was any different than any other crochet until I read the article in more detail. It has a drawing of a fat-handled flat hook and the hook is tiny compared to the handle. The hook was called a Cleek. It says that in Banffshire, Scotland the same tool is called a punnie. I gleaned from the article that the tension is in the right hand.

 

"The strand moved around her right forefinger and quickly made a loop around the tip of the tool, then into a loop in her work." ~Edith Peck. Crochet World Omnibook, Fall 1981.

 

It seems the technique is done similar to continental knitting.

You can write to House of White Birches, the publisher of Crochet World Omnibook.

Edited by bethintx1
changed my mind

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How interesting. I had just been tempted by Mielke Farms mentioning three types of needlework I had never heard of - kumihimo, locker hooking and naalbinding. Think I will stick with crochet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have done this reversible crochet. I made an afghan/blanket for a junior size bed. It does take what seems like a lot of yarn, but the finished blanket is nice and thick and warm. I did mine with a variegated white/pink/blue with a solid white on the other side. Now that you ladies are talking about it, guess I will now have to make another one. They really are nice blankets. Oh, just an added note - the one I made was over 25 years ago for one of my friends who had just had a baby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tracy4010, thanks for the pattern! And ye of the "snorlie latchets" - thanks for making me laugh!!!!!!!!! Will definitely have to work this into my vocabulary. LOLROF!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My great great grandmother O'Brien called her knitting "cleeking". Every young child in Scotland learned to "cleekit" when they were watching over cattle or sheep. It gave them something to do that was productive and kept them still and quiet at the same time. "ye canna cleekit?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cleeking is the Scottish word for a large hook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...