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Guest NCAugeriFan

I'm curious to know why there is "crochet prejudice"? I know people who crochet and some who knit and some who do both. One lady I know (Dorcas) has been crocheting for 50 years (and her work is gorgeous) and she does not like to knit. She even showed me a knit stitch used in crochet. I also know a lady (Diane) who knits but doesn't like to crochet. And my husband has an aunt who does both.

 

It is a personal choice and each one results in beautiful work.

 

What I like about crocheting is I only have to use one crochet hook. I'm too awkward to use 2 needles and try to keep yarn on one or both needles. I'm not that coordinated! :rollin

 

Everyone has their preference and folks should respect and appreciate each craft.

 

I don't go in yarn stores cause I figured they are too expensive....just take me to the craft section in Walmart and I'm satisfied!!!:thumbsup

 

Cadie

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Guest SamplerLady

mmouseplus.gifAs the new crochet instructor at my daughter's place of employment (yarn and bead store) I'd like some input. If you walked into an LYS, what would you see that would tell you it's a crochet friendly store? Other than a large selection of hooks and patterns. I can't control that.

 

What would tell you that the people there speak crochet? :D

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Guest NCAugeriFan

A crochet friendly store:

 

:star sell crochet magazines and books

 

:star The employees wear a crochet item like a vest

 

:star I remember going in a small craft shop (lots of cross stitch) and the owner/employee were sitting there cross stitiching. Don't know if employees are allowed to work on any project during store hours, but if yes, have them work on a crochet project or pick a day and offer a free demonstration of crochet techniques esp using beads in crochet.

 

:star have a section of the store set up for students to display their crochet work. or have a bulletin board with photos of folks taking a crochet class and photos of them with their completed project.

 

:star display posters/signs about upcoming crochet classes and maybe add some of the photos from previous classes to the poster/sign

 

:star maybe have large poster display of people knitting and people crocheting, doing beadwork, and using beadwork in crochet

 

Cadie :sun

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To me, even something as simple as crocheted yarn swatches shows u r crochet-friendly!! All my local yarn shops show their yarn in little knited squares, never crochet! And even Michael's and JA's display a very large majority of their yarn knitted, and not crocheted.

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It really annoys me that all the samples we are sent (I work at Jo-Ann's) are knitted. But... they're supplied by the yarn vendors...

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Just getting back after the holidays and a cold and am wowed by all the replies and information here!:bounce

 

Thanks for the info on the bella online article. I think that shows very clearly that it really doesn't matter yarn-wise which way you want to go, it's a creative choice!

 

Crochet is just so easy and natural for me, that's why I do it. I tried to knit but it just didn't feel right to me. I think it's all creative and good and I'd like to see a free flow of ideas between knitters and crocheters back and forth.

 

I think the suggestions for a crochet friendly store are great. I would just add that a crochet night/day or time would be great. It could be bring whatever you're working on or it could be project based....some new skill or trick that everyone could share.

 

Thank you all for the support and crochet company!

Happy New Year!

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I can remember taking a knitting class at church once as a kid :knit I have to admit it just didn't "click" with me, but my grandmother gave me a crochet hook and the rest, as they say is history.

 

To be honest when I started reading this thread I had to chuckle, then just be completely :eek by the amount of ignorance out there. Being heavily involved with my Arabian horses I encounter alot of prejudice within the equine industry but never ever thought it would be so prevalent in the craft world.. how silly can people be? :hee I mean seriously? :rotfl

 

I have nothing against knitting, it just didn't do it for me... but I sure wouldn't talk it down either lol and I sure would wonder about places and people that would talk so openly against something and show outright ignorance at the same time :lol I love the poster up there that said they invited the lady to learn how to crochet.. and she found out how "easy" it really was :bad

 

Brings to mind the old indian saying about walking a mile in your neighbors moccasins... sheesh.. people.. I swear :yawn

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As I was reading my Sunday paper this morning and I was shocked. Our local knitting only store is now offering crochet classes. :woohoo :cheer2 It is a move in the right direction. Guess I can go there now and really check out all of their wonderful yarns and not get snobbed.

Michelle:wink

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I found this amazing yarn store in the next little town from me. I visited and loved the yarns. Everyone and every example though was KNITTED. They told me they have a group most mornings and also they'd be happy to "teach" me to knit. Said bring any project any time.

So I took a crochet project. About 8 ppl around the table and the ONLY conversation I got ALL MORNING was criticism of "throwing my yarn". Uh, duh, I thought arts and crafts were PERSONAL and all art is acceptable. So I "throw" my yarn. That wasn't enough. I got tons of comments about how old fashioned and inept crocheting was. Note: all these women were in their late 50's to 70's. I swore I was in a Bitch n Stitch group. More B than S. Sadly, I had had enough and stopped spending my precious dollars on the beautiful and EXPENSIVE yarns I had in mind for those extra special projects. I buy online now.

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I am really fortunate that the LYS I go to are all crochet friendly and one in particular even has a sign on their door that says they are crochet friendly. I have never had shop help tell me I needed 3 times the amount of yarn for a crocheted item...but then I usually know what I need and how I need. In the shop that I "live" at, I'm one of the crochet people that others go to for help, including the shop staff. I have the attitude of wanting to educate people about crocheting without taking away from knitting. I try really hard to not be a reverse snob about it either. Some knitters have even come over to what I call the "dark side" and learn to crochet themselves...however most knitters I know also crochet.

 

But yeah, I don't quite understand it myself....most LYS lean heavily towards knitting, even my beloved shop that I "live" in. They have nothing against crochet, they have many crochet books and shop samples of crochet, but the knitting customers still outnumber the crocheting customers. But I am doing all I can to even that out a bit...

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I found this amazing yarn store in the next little town from me. I visited and loved the yarns. Everyone and every example though was KNITTED. They told me they have a group most mornings and also they'd be happy to "teach" me to knit. Said bring any project any time.

So I took a crochet project. About 8 ppl around the table and the ONLY conversation I got ALL MORNING was criticism of "throwing my yarn". Uh, duh, I thought arts and crafts were PERSONAL and all art is acceptable. So I "throw" my yarn. That wasn't enough. I got tons of comments about how old fashioned and inept crocheting was. Note: all these women were in their late 50's to 70's. I swore I was in a Bitch n Stitch group. More B than S. Sadly, I had had enough and stopped spending my precious dollars on the beautiful and EXPENSIVE yarns I had in mind for those extra special projects. I buy online now.

 

That is really sad...I've never experienced that...of course I make a point of wearing some of my crocheted items when I go to socials like this and I've yet to hear any negative comments. I was recently at a really awesome shop in Sacramento and the owner of the shop was a crocheter...her daughter, however, taught knitting...I just think that overall there are preferences...I prefer crochet, although I also knit...because of the crocheting I do, more often than not I hear things like, "I didn't know you could do that with crocheting..." I just think that the average person doesn't realize what one can do with crocheting past the back bones of crocheting being baby sets and afghans...

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I can remember taking a knitting class at church once as a kid :knit I have to admit it just didn't "click" with me, but my grandmother gave me a crochet hook and the rest, as they say is history.

 

To be honest when I started reading this thread I had to chuckle, then just be completely :eek by the amount of ignorance out there. Being heavily involved with my Arabian horses I encounter alot of prejudice within the equine industry but never ever thought it would be so prevalent in the craft world.. how silly can people be? :hee I mean seriously? :rotfl

 

I have nothing against knitting, it just didn't do it for me... but I sure wouldn't talk it down either lol and I sure would wonder about places and people that would talk so openly against something and show outright ignorance at the same time :lol I love the poster up there that said they invited the lady to learn how to crochet.. and she found out how "easy" it really was :bad

 

Brings to mind the old indian saying about walking a mile in your neighbors moccasins... sheesh.. people.. I swear :yawn

 

In bold...yes, there is a lot of ignorance out there...which is why I dubbed myself the "crochet ambassador..." I'm out to educate...

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Sadly, that's about what I would've expected.

 

I'm confused tho - how does one 'throw their yarn' while crocheting?

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Sadly, that's about what I would've expected.

 

I'm confused tho - how does one 'throw their yarn' while crocheting?

 

Yeah, I was wondering about that myself...maybe it's just the whole action of crocheting...it may look like "wasted" energy compared to knitters who stitch continental...I don't know, but honestly I've never heard such a thing before...

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I've heard that with crochet you use more yarn, but it all depends on the stitch and needle and the yarn... for all the knitters know we could be using way less yarn than they are. just a thought...

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I've heard that with crochet you use more yarn, but it all depends on the stitch and needle and the yarn... for all the knitters know we could be using way less yarn than they are. just a thought...

 

It really does depend on a number of factors. But if one is making an afghan with a stitch pattern that is heavy textured, you will be using a lot of yarn...by the same token, if one is making something with a more lacy pattern, I'd venture to say one might be using close to the same amount as a knitter would. I don't see it as a problem...means that yarn shops end up making more money one way or the other...lol.

 

I have to add something here...where I hang out, some people have tried to learn crochet and some have taken to it, and some just haven't...they get more pleasure and satisfaction with knitting. Crocheting just isn't "easy" for them. I feel good when I have taught a knitter (one who only knits) to crochet, even if it's just an edging on a knitted project...but if they prefer knitting over crocheting, that's fine...I prefer crocheting over knitting (I can do both, but I get more satisfaction out of crocheting than knitting.) I try to remember that when I'm in a room full of knitters.

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As a general rule crochet does use more yarn. It doesn't need to be a textured stitch although that would use a lot more yarn. Crochet also produces a fabric that's thicker than knit.

 

One would think that a yarn store would be thrilled to have crocheter buying 3 times more yarn for the same sized project.

 

Personally - I don't care. I've tried knitting and it was a disaster. Crocheting is MY thing. I'm certainly not going to spend my time hanging out with people that are looking down their noses at me. Why would anyone want to?

 

Is it really any different than 'car guys'. Fighting over which is better - chevy, ford or dodge? They're all cars. Just like it's all yarn.

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As a general rule crochet does use more yarn. It doesn't need to be a textured stitch although that would use a lot more yarn. Crochet also produces a fabric that's thicker than knit.

 

One would think that a yarn store would be thrilled to have crocheter buying 3 times more yarn for the same sized project.

 

Personally - I don't care. I've tried knitting and it was a disaster. Crocheting is MY thing. I'm certainly not going to spend my time hanging out with people that are looking down their noses at me. Why would anyone want to?

 

Is it really any different than 'car guys'. Fighting over which is better - chevy, ford or dodge? They're all cars. Just like it's all yarn.

 

True 'nuff...

 

I don't know if any of you have what's called a "yarn shop crawl" but we have two of them in the month of May...the smaller one has about 8 shops and goes from Tacoma up through Kitsap County to a small town of Poulsbo. Debbie MacComber's A Good Yarn Shop (which is my "home") is included in that crawl. I did the crawl a couple of years ago and it is so interesting to see how each shop operates. All shops were welcoming and while yes, there were a lot of knitters, there were also a lot of crocheters that made that crawl. The second one takes place throughout Seattle...there are over 25 shops and I haven't done that one...but I've been to a few of the shops close to where I live and they too are pretty crochet friendly.

 

From the time I participated in the first crawl a couple of years ago, one of the shops has since closed. We have regulars from that town that make the hike to A Good Yarn Shop...we talked about that shuttered shop...they reason they didn't like going there, 1) social gathering was frowned upon altogether...2) they didn't feel welcomed at all (both knitters and crocheters) 3) the price of their yarn was excessive.

 

The shops I continue to stop at I like because 1) they are crochet friendly, they see the validity of crocheting, spinning, sewing, tatting, etc. along with knitting, 2) they are warm and welcoming and are interested in what you're doing.

 

Over the doors of A Good Yarn Shop are these words, and honestly, it should be the motto of every shop that caters to those of us who partake of hand work of any kind: "Where traditions are taught and friendships are formed."

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It really annoys me that all the samples we are sent (I work at Jo-Ann's) are knitted. But... they're supplied by the yarn vendors...

 

That's probably because they can supply knit samples that are made by machine. You can knit with a machine, but you can't crochet with one!

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I get it jokingly from my hubby and sister that between the cross stitch and the crochet, they reckon I'm really in my 80s, not my 30s - I just smile and say it keeps me from the pub - LOL!

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I sincerely doubt anyone can ever say I personally prefer knitting. Truth is I am well known for saying I can Knit, but I CHOOSE not to.

 

So here is what I have never been able to understand about this entire topic -

 

LYS perceived attitude :

business is business,

if 90% of your business is from one group, and 10% or less from another, where should you be investing your resources? Did you know that in many stores QUILTERS buy more yarn for embellishment then their Crochet customers.

 

It is also worth considering that OFTEN the LYS CANNOT buy the yarns sold in Big Box stores at wholesale for a price lower than what the yarn is sold for at retail in the big box.

 

Does not matter why, it is just the fact.

 

Any business has to make choices related to investing their resources include everything from tools, classes and yes, improving staff skills

 

Are there crocheters who shop in a LYS over a Big Box store. Of course there are, but not enough of them on a regular basis. Just is what it is.

 

It is my unscientific theory that the basis of the perceived attitude is more the result knowing consciously and unconsciously they cannot properly serve that customer and it is upsetting to them - so they then act defensively - I wish I did not have to spend so much time learning about knitting, but the fact is that is 93+% of our business.

 

I guess you could say Knitting is my day job and Crochet is among my passion

 

Knitters vs Crocheters - seriously, why does it matter what they think?

 

If you are happy with what you accomplish and how you get there, why waste the time and energy being bothered?

 

Perhaps instead we need Yarn libertarian - Buy the Yarn you like, Use it the way you want, with the tools you prefer - and afford the same courtesy to those who may choose a different path.

 

Brief Rant Over

 

Wheat

Edited by wheat

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I totally get the 'business is business' and that's how it should be. The part I don't understand is why an owner would turn away the 10% that's not knitters.

 

Obviously, I'm not talking about refusing to make a sale but having the attitude that it's beneath them.

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I totally get the 'business is business' and that's how it should be. The part I don't understand is why an owner would turn away the 10% that's not knitters.

 

Obviously, I'm not talking about refusing to make a sale but having the attitude that it's beneath them.

 

Like I said before:

 

It is my unscientific theory that the basis of the perceived attitude is more the result knowing consciously and unconsciously they cannot properly serve that customer and it is upsetting to them - so they then act defensively - I wish I did not have to spend so much time learning about knitting, but the fact is that is 93+% of our business.

 

Wheat

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I don't know. I suppose that's true for some but I have a hard time believing that it's true for most - especially the ones that do look down on crochet. I think the defensive thing is more of an excuse than anything else.

 

There's a very high end LYS in town that's geared towards knitters. When asked I told the owner that I crocheted. She apologized for not having much in crochet supplies and was very pleasant. From the conversations that I've seen here - my experience is the rare one.

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My supermarket (that I work in.) has a conference room that the community can use.. One of the managers told me that a group of knitters were coming in on Sat mornings. I had to go in to get my hours the following Saturday, so I went in to see some of the work. As I was admiring some of the work, one lady said I could join them as long as I knit. I said that I've been crocheting for 40 years. She told me not to come back as they didn't want my kind there. Unfortunately for them my boss heard the remark, and said " what kind is that?". She replied, " Someone that doesn't know how to do the right crafts.".

Needless to say they haven't been back to knit. The boss said unless everyone is allowed in to the group, no one would be allowed in

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