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miki421

boys crocheting

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In my home, there is no head of the home. Me and my hubby run a happy well adjusted home for my 3 boys.

 

I dont understand all this girl/boy stuff.

 

I worked in a mechanics shop for three years. LOVED IT!

 

I live on a farm, milked goats, pitch hay, do everything my hubby does. It is a huge help.

 

No one wears the pants in my house. It is equal as equal can get. I feel sorry for anyone who does not live a life such as mine and Jim's.

 

Heather

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As a male crocheter for over 35 yrs, I can understand what you ladies are saying.

 

It sounds nice, but men don't look at things the same way.

 

Most men wouldn't publicly admit that they do needlecrafts....it's a 'macho' thing.... they'll do it privately.

 

It seems to be getting a little better. I'm older, and no longer imtimidated or embarrased, but it can be hell for a young kid....

 

And as far as Dad's attitude......that's fine.....just teach the boy something else....spend more time with him instead of critizing...

 

He just want something to do.

 

Ken

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My FIL knits... well he knows how and used to do it, not sure if he still does or not. He's one of the "manliest" men I've ever known too. He's got that head of household mentality, yet he still knits and he thought it was great that my son wanted to learn to crochet, said it was something all boys should learn (either knit or crochet) how to do. Fortunately, my hubby didn't inherit the head of household attitude from him, but he did get the open mind about fiberwork. He has no interest in working with hook or needle, but doesn't in any way prevent our son from it. Hubby's interests run more along the lines of decorating (when it comes to what most ppl would classify as "feminine" arts) and to some degree fashion... I always get his opinion on such matters, and usually go with what he thinks (because he's got a great eye for color/placement etc.) He's also a wonderful cook and cleans around the house. None of that makes him any less "manly" in my eyes, or in his friends eyes from what I've seen.

 

Frankly, I think everyone should know how to do things for themselves, be it men knowing how to do housework/laundry/sewing/fiber work... or women knowing how to change a tire, fix a loose fanbelt, or build a fence or whatever. It just seems like common sense to me. Even if I don't choose to do such things, I could do it if I wanted/needed to.

 

::steps off soapbox now::

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this is the type of mentality that seriously kills me

threelolives, I'd take this up as a debat if we were elsewhere. But I don't think that's what Crochetville is for. All I was trying to do is cool this thread down. It's not a life or death issue. I will make one comment. Man being head of the home does not mean his wife and kids are slaves to his every wim. Things can and should be discussed. But God gave man the authority over his own house. It's his responsibility.

 

I hope you survive with your Grandkids over Easter! :) I guess Grandma has been making some pretty cool stuff to get them all so interested.

 

Thanks for your view Ken.

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Okay my :twocents

My youngest son is 15 and in the ninth grade, he plays football, he is on the wrestling team ( made varsity this year) and also participates in track. He chose to do those things because he likes them!! He also chose to take cooking classes and sewing classes this year. Do I care, nope, his choice. Does anyone at school make fun of him, nope. Does his father think this makes him a wimp, nope. We figure these choices will make him a better man, husband and a great father when the day comes. If he wants to learn to do crochet, I will teach him. Stepping off the :sb

Michelle

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Add my cousin - 6 and a half feet tall, 330 pounds of solid muscle, full time cowboy, went to school on football and baseball scholarships - to the group of men crocheting. He does the most amazing thread crochet... I wish I could do that. He started crocheting when he was 6 and never stopped.

 

His brother won Best of Show at a Quilt Show when he was 21, too... their dad wasn't thrilled, but he didn't say anything either!

 

Anne

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I think what this all boils down to is... We all feel very strongly that No One should keep this boy from learning Crochet, especially since he wants to learn. What struck a cord with me, was the boy thing, girl thing. I was raised to keep an open mind about all things and I am greatful for that.

 

If this boy wants to learn bad enough, he'll find away, whether it be now or later.

 

We are all very passionate about our craft and we love to

share. Glad to be part of crochetville.:f-1 with all its opinions and personalities. :grouphug I know I've expressed mine.

 

Lisa

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The problem I have with it is the Father is squashing (couldn't think of a better word) the childs interests.

I believe we should encourage our kids to be and do what they want as long as it's not harmful.You never know he could become a wonderul crochet designer one day :artist:)) but if he continues to be told he can't because he's a boy he could lose his desire to try anything new.

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My husband once knew how to crochet, even before I ever learned. His mom taught him. This is funny because his mom is a Korean woman and you wouldn't really think it would be something she would teach her son. Too bad she never taught him Korean, but that is a whole different subject.

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Check out this web site. It is an article in our paper yesterday, in reguards to boys crocheting. They are in a 4th grade class and love it.

 

:cheer2 :cheer2 :cheer2

 

KidsCrocheting.jpg

 

 

St. Petersburg Times Article

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I think that an important thing to remember , is that encouragement is important for kiddos. If they want to do something, we need to encourage it (as long as it is safe). They need education, encouragement, and guidance. And if it is something that might be out of the norm, we need to help with that too. Letting them know that others may not see things the way they do, but that that's ok, and there is nothing wrong with what they do. We expect that as adults, why should we expect , or accept, any less for our kiddos??

 

Kelly

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Well, well. Lots of hot opinions. Many of which I agree with. Some I don't. :)

 

Amber, please pass on to your brother Andrew that I think his afghan is great! And what a great thing to do to make it for a charity! Well done Andrew.

 

I think it was Joe Namath who did needlepoint. ahem. showing my age here? Anyway I think he got a lot of footballers interested.

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