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Dishcloths - Knit vs Crochet? Does crochet lose?


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I haven't made crocheted dishcloths in years, I always do the knitted, garter-stitch ones which start at the corner and increase up. I'm feeling a bit guilty, as I have two crocheted dishcloth patterns on my website (a ripple and a sc/dc sttitch) but I never do them anymore because crocheted dishcloths just seem inferior to knitted ones! :2blush

 

The knitted ones dry faster, don't hold odor, scrub well and wring-out well. They just seem to be flat-out better!

 

Does anyone want to argue with me? :goodorbad

 

Do any of you do FABULOUS crocheted dishcloths which are just as good as - or better than - knitted ones? If so, what patterns are you using? What yarn, etc? I'd love to hear a differing opinion and give crocheted dishcloths a try again! :devil

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My mom gives me a bunch of knitted ones for Christmas every year. (A friend of hers makes them and she buys them for like $1 each) anyway, I love them, always have, but I have several crocheted ones I love.

 

I usually use Sugar N Cream or Peaches N Cream yarn and I like the way they look. Many people complain about fading and such but I haven't had any problems with that. Sure, after maybe a dozen washings the color fades but that's typical.

 

I tend to like the scrubby cloths which are great for scrubbing (obviously) and I like the "looser" ones with bigger stitches for cleaning things like glasses and such.

 

So as far as I am concerned, I like them both the same. There are literally thousands of crocheted dishcloth patterns out there. Go to the store, pick one up and give them a try. Try more than one... You'll love em!

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I'm both a knitter and a crocheter, but I've only made crocheted dishclothes, so I will have to knit some to do a comparison. The performance of a dishcloth really depends on the pattern anyway. Here is my favorite crocheted dishcloth pattern in terms of performance:

 

http://www.geocities.com/cherilynm/EasyCrochetedDishcloth.html

 

This makes a thinner, stretchy dishcloth that wrings well and dries fast, so maybe there is something to what you are saying. Pretty crocheted lacy dishclothes are nice to look at, but when it comes to every-day utility, I prefer an even fabric that is not too hole-y and not too thick. I guess a simple knitted fabric fits the bill. On the other hand, I'm a sucker for pretty stitches made by crochet. :hook

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Well, to be quite honest, I've never actually seen with my own eyes nor used a knitted dishcloth. But I would guess that being a novice knitter AT BEST and not really knowing anybody else who knits OR crochets (my mother used to, but carpal tunnel and arthritis have prevented her from continuing) might have something to do with that.

 

And I've only recently discovered the joy that is dishcloth making. Although I have to say that the ones I've made so far were so pretty that I decided they couldn't be used for dishes. :lol I've kept them for washcloths instead.

 

So I couldn't really say which is better.

 

I did have a thought, though. It seems to me (and I could be wrong, but this is my theory anyway) that the yarn/thread used for the dishcloth would make more difference than whether it's knitted or crocheted. If you've got a heavy yarn, it seems to me that it would be harder to wring out (and dry out, for that matter), than a thinner one.

 

Just my two cents, for whatever it's worth. :hook

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I've both knit and crocheted dishclothes and like the feel of the knitted ones better. The knit ones are less bulky than the crocheted ones, in my opinion. They also fold up more easily to store in my kitchen linen drawer.

 

Beth

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I make both crocheted and knitted dishcloths...having recently learned to knit, I practiced by making the dishcloths using the same pattern as you, mrs who, sometimes I make them in stockinette rather than garter, so the end result was is a little less bulky. I like either knit or crochet really, no preference, but I will never buy dishcloths again, I will always make them :D They are superior scrubbers in my opinion. My family is always after me to make them more, more more! There are pros and cons of both I guess. It really depends on which patterns you use. I have a book of 99 crocheted patterns (Leisure Arts "The Big Book of Dishcloths"), and some are better than others at scrubbing and some dry out faster than others too. For me it takes a lot longer to knit a cloth as opposed to crocheting one, so if speed is a factor then crochet wins...however it takes less yarn (for me, anyway) to knit a cloth than it does to crochet one, so knit wins there. I always use either bernat handicrafter cotton or sugar n cream cotton yarns. For versatility in patterns I have to give it to crochet, because of all the lacy stitches and various shapes you can do.

 

And as to whether hand-made cloths are better than store bought ones, well all you have to do is walk by a craft stall or show and see people buying them up like hotcakes. I saw one lady selling hers (both knit and crocheted ones) for $5 EACH!! And people were paying it like it was nothing! :eek

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I have to say I prefer the knit dishclothes, they use up much less cotton, aren't as thick and hold up just as well if not better with repeated washings...I make quite a few a year and send them to my FIL and SIL every year at Christmas time...they love them!!

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I have to say I like knitted ones better too. My first knit project was a dishcloth in a 2 stitch check pattern and I absolutely love it.

 

That said, I made a dishcloth using alternating sc/dc (granite stitch?) then trimmed it around with 2 rounds of sc. I LOVED that one! It camd out so pretty I gave it to one of my South African Aunties. Blue Sugar n Cream it was.

 

This year I plan on doing dish cloth/dish towel sets in a 4 stitch check knit pattern for Xmas gifts.

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My vote is with those who prefer knitted cloths, because I like them thinner. I like just plain stockinette with a seed stitch or garter stitch border. However, I DO like to make crocheted cloths from 2 strands of #10 cotton. I usually use the sc/dc pattern for these. Nice with one strand of varigated and one strand of white. They are a bit stiff until they've been washed a few times, but work well for dishes or the shower.

 

Alice

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  • 14 years later...

Welcome to the 'ville Deelorra - you might want to delete your email address as anyone on the internet can see it, we don't want someone sending spammy stuff to you.

Unfortunately that site hosting the link 'went away several years ago, and I couldn't find it archived.  It's too bad someone didn't say the name of it, it might have been findable elsewhere or one of those like "grandma's favorite" or "ballband dishcloth" that have infinite variations.

I'm one who mostly crochets, but I also prefer knit washcloths as some confessed above - they are less dense and dry quicker; I suppose crochet might work better if you worked not with standard worsted weight  kitchen cotton, but a fingering weight cotton.  If I were to guess a plain crochet stitch pattern that would work nicely as a washcloth, and was neither super dense or super holey, it would be the woven stitch (which has many names), basically sc, chain 1, repeat; next row chain 1 over the sc, sc into the chain from the row below.  AKA granite stitich, moss stitch - there are several tutorials out there.

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I've also made crochet and Tunisian crochet dishcloths with fingering weight cotton. I bought a small supply at my local yarn store. It's pricier than for instance Peaches & Cream cotton, but works well for my preferences. Lighter weight but sturdy. For crochet, I like the Moss stitch for dishcloths. Dense, but soft enough to wring out well. Hope this helps.

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