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Is it normal for a new spinning wheel to come without a "how to" manual? I am a little peeved that something so expensive wouldn't have a basic..."this is how to ply with the ply head"...or this is the basics of spinning...

 

My wheel had one sheet of paper that had the basics on how to put the wheel together and that is it.

 

Secondly, just wanted to share some yarn I spun and ply'd. It is the bottom/center purple yarn in the picture.

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Typically the vendor selling the item (if buying from a third party) handles that unless you purchased online in which case they assume you already know how to spin.

 

[i think they assume that if you are investing that much into it, you already know how to use it, I think. :) ]

 

A handful of books I find helpful --

 

* The Spinners Companion (Interweave). Very basic book, but helped me when I had some problems with my wheel I couldn't figure out.

 

* The Alden Amos Big Book of Handspinning (Interweave). The textbook on wheel spinning by the very opinionated Alden Amos. This book has just about every bit of information you could ever want on spinning. Math formulas, diagrams, so much information, tips, and other things. It's fantastic!

 

If you can, find a guild nearby and take the wheel. They will help you out. :)

 

Enjoy the new wheel!

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Thanks for the book suggestions. I do think you are defending the manufacturer who is making the most money and not the consumer who shouldn't have to have it all figured out before making the big purchase.

 

I do have the concept of spinning, but I don't quite get when you are plying the yarn where you put the lazy kate that comes with it. Do you just hold it? So, there are some things that could be answered if the manufacturer just had the basic how to's and I think it is irresponsible for them to not supply that. Honestly, had I known there wasn't a manual in the box I would have asked the vendor more questions.

 

I don't have any local retailers or guilds to go sit in and watch what they do. Although I could drive up to the retailer, 2hrs from here if I really needed to. My point isn't that I should have to do all of the research on how my wheel works that the manufacturer should provide that for me, especially since this is a high end wheel, isn't like I bought a CD spindle off of ebay, you know?

 

I am curious if Lendrum is the only one that does this or if other companies are the same...only have instructions on how to put it together, but not how to use it?

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Kromski provide a videotape I believe but it doesn't really have spinning information, just how to put the wheel together. I'm not sure about Ashford.

 

The thing is -- when I buy a bicycle, it doesn't come with instructions on how to ride it. When I buy a car, it doesn't come with instructions on how to drive (just how to use certain things like the radio, turn signals, etc). When you buy a pottery wheel, it only comes with instructions on how to turn it on, not how to throw pots.

 

So I never expected my wheel to come with instructions on how to spin. Does that make any sense?

 

Also, since everyone uses different methods to spin, placement of lazy kates, etc -- including instructions would be a waste for 95% of the customers.

 

As for the lazy kate, it depends. Some people like to have it elevated, a few feet away. IIRC, Alden Amos suggests putting it completely across the room behind the spinner (which I can't and don't do, since I have dogs and cat and DH that I can just see tangling up in it). Other people like it on the ground on the righthand side about 4 feet away from the wheel. It depends.

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I have to agree with Jess Wendy, honestly you need to try to find someone to show you if you can its much easier .If you have to learn from a book or video i would recommend Ashfords. We have women here that travel 4 hours on a bus to learn to spin and use their drumcarders because there was no one closer. Now i would highly recommend you get a copy of Spin Off magazine as it will give a list of the guilds near to you or even take out an add in the local paper or put an add in the local college or public library.Its a big investment buying a wheel and you need to invest in learning to use it and get the best out of the experience. Goodluck.

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:cheer I got my spinning wheel from new and it did not come with instructions.

I think it is normally assumed that you would find someone to give you lessons.

Spinning is a very hands-on when you are learning and I could not imagine how it would be explained in a book. You might find books in the Library but I think they will more likely be advanced, for when you have learned the basics.

In NZ, we have Spinning & Weaving groups which meet on a regular basis so you may be able to find such a group in your community.

They are usually the sort of people, a bit like Knitters & Crocheters, who love to share their knowlege with others.

I really loved the lady who came to my wool shop on a Saturday afternoon, after we closed, and gave a small group of us lessons. She was so much fun & we did a lot of laughing at our tangles. We all got going in the end, then got on to natural plant dyes, which was also great fun to do.

:think What sort of wheel did you get?

I have a lovely dark mahogony wheel for sale right now, simply because I do not really have room for it.

I have not used it since I sold my shop in 1994 so decided it has to go.

I hope you find help soon.

Have fun.

Colleen.:hug

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Great job on the skein. As for instructions....well, I now have three wheels and none came with instructions on how to spin. I find a great resource to be on line. Check out this website http://www.icanspin.com/toc.htm for some of the basics. Can be frustrating. I am self taught and a lot of that was just trial and error. But so worth it.

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Thanks for all of the advice! (Your car didn't come with an owner's manual?)

 

I just thought this was weird, but it seems to be industry standard.

 

I like your examples, but it is just subjective. For instance, my camera which is similar in cost to my spinning wheel came with a user's manual. Now, anyone who has used an SLR will tell you it is difficult to learn photography from a book. It is definately hands on and it is even better when someone else teaches you or if you take a class. However, it is still nice to have a book or manual, even if it says "load film this way" or for spinning, "basic instructions for using the plyhead."

 

I am not as "peeved" about it, especially knowing that most other wheels don't come with any manual.

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Its funny, I think I got more information on how to spin when I got a drop spindle from Ashford than I did with any of the three Ashford wheels I have. My new favorite is an Ashford traditonal named captain jack,( he has a wobble) He has a bulky flyer now and a double treadle upgrade, a snazzy red fetch cord. Interweave press has some downloadable how to spin brochures that are very concise and informative.

Deb

 

I added some new rovings and patterns to my store today

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I like your examples, but it is just subjective. For instance, my camera which is similar in cost to my spinning wheel came with a user's manual. Now, anyone who has used an SLR will tell you it is difficult to learn photography from a book. It is definately hands on and it is even better when someone else teaches you or if you take a class. However, it is still nice to have a book or manual, even if it says "load film this way" or for spinning, "basic instructions for using the plyhead."

 

Yeah, my dSLR (which was 3x the cost of my wheel, ugh) came with a huge manual, plus copies in Spanish and Japanese. Though it has a lot more options than my Lenny does, even with the fast flyer and the plying head! heh.

 

It might not be a bad idea to send the manu of your wheel (I think you got a Lendrum?) a little note stating that it might be nice to include a basic how-to with their wheels in the future -- see what they say.:)

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I bet you love using your dSLR, also! Lucky! (sh...don't tell my husband, but I have been spying on a digital SLR, also and hope to put it on my Tax refund list for next year.) :)

 

Jess, I am just in a funk lately. The problem I had with plying was when I was plying the plastic clip on the side of the bobbin kept popping off. I don't know if I had it all set up right when I plied because the little paper they sent with the spinning wheel didn't talk about plying. Can you do me a HUGE favor? The next time you ply can you take a few pics of it so I can see how you have yours all set up? Thanks!!

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Ok so how have you been doing with your spinning have you worked out your new wheel Wendy?

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