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I am getting ready to block some sweater panels and I am not really sure the best way to do it. I have heard that it works to get a towel and lay it on a flat surface and then place the panels on the towel and then dampen another towel and lay it on top.

 

I have also heard that dampening the actual panels and then pinning them is better.

 

Oh yeah, and should I block the panels before I sew them together or block the whole sweater?

 

What would you all recommend?

 

Thanks

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I lay the pieces down (before sewing) on a towel then spray with water to dampen. I shape the pieces evenly to the measurements in my pattern, pin and leave until dry. You can also hold a steam iron over the pieces and steam them and let dry (just don't touch the iron to them). The project I have going with Paton's Brilliant instructs to lay a damp towel over the pieces and let dry.

 

I blocked before sewing because one of my crochet books said sewing the pieces is easier if you block to shape first.

 

Right now my dining room table has two tops blocking on it.

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The preferred sequence is to block the pieces. I think it's so you have straight seams and the garment hangs better.

 

As to how to block, I've done it several ways. If there's a plain pattern (like all SC - HDCs) I like the steam cloth/hot iron method. It kills the yarn and permanently shapes it. The resulting "fabric" is easier for me to join to make the garment.

 

However if there's a pattern (like from popcorns or cables), the dampen and pin is the way to go. An iron and steam would flatten the pattern.

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As a somewhat novice to crochet....I don't really understand the reason behind blocking. Is it just for wool or specialty yarns? If it's a simple washable yarn, won't the shape be gone when it's washed? Please excuse my naivetee (sp?)....I would really like to know.

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If you use the Steam and iron method of blocking, you "kill" the yarn and it will stay permanently in the blocked shape. By this I mean pinning the article to the desired shape and then place a damp press cloth on top of it. When the press cloth is dry, pick up the iron and move it to another damp spot. If you unravel something that's been steam blocked, you can't straighten the yarn or remove the flattening effect of the blocking.

 

If you dampen and pin to block, yes at times the blocking is removed if you wash the object. If you have a raised pattern to protect, steam and iron method will ruin the textured effect.

 

Some blocking links:

http://www.wrights.com/class/needlework/finishing/finishing.htm

http://www.michaels.com/art/online/displayArticle?articleNum=ae0079

http://www.crochetpatterncentral.com/directory/finished_product.php

 

 

 

 

As a somewhat novice to crochet....I don't really understand the reason behind blocking. Is it just for wool or specialty yarns? If it's a simple washable yarn, won't the shape be gone when it's washed? Please excuse my naivetee (sp?)....I would really like to know.

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OKay I did some blocking on one panel just to try it out before I did the whole thing. The method I used was the one where you lay a dampened cloth over the panel and then let it dry completely over night.

 

Well the panel looks all wonky and doesn't lay flat. The sides still curl and although I fiddled with the panel to get it the right shape before I put the wet towel over it, it still looks mishapen.

 

Should I try wetting the actual panel this time and then pinning it?Or should i try the steam approach?

 

SO frustrating.

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It just sounds like the method you tried isn't strong enough for the piece. Do you have a test swatch available? Even if you don't it may be worth it to make a small one. That way you could test out the steam method and see what it does before you do it on a large piece.

 

 

 

 

OKay I did some blocking on one panel just to try it out before I did the whole thing. The method I used was the one where you lay a dampened cloth over the panel and then let it dry completely over night.

 

Well the panel looks all wonky and doesn't lay flat. The sides still curl and although I fiddled with the panel to get it the right shape before I put the wet towel over it, it still looks mishapen.

 

Should I try wetting the actual panel this time and then pinning it?Or should i try the steam approach?

 

SO frustrating.

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