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jennmwalsh

Dying with Kool-Aid

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I got this chart online bookmarked, thought it might help some of you debating the felt and dye idea.

 

Kool-Aid chart

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Thanks Jenn - It would have made my color/flavor choices a little different. Next time I'll know. <img border=0 src="http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/wink.gif" /> I was surprised with what I ended up with, but happy all the same.

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Are there other good options for dying besides the Koolaid method? I did a bag which turned out nicely and last night I dyed a full skein of yarn (8 oz skein, ugh!) with red & purple that didn't come out like I expected at all. It's pretty funky and I'm pleasantly surprised but it could have been a disaster.

 

I've also been adding Wilton icing color which gives me a little better color control but I worry about how permanent it really is. I used to come home from work looking like a rainbow from icing cakes and I was always able to get it out of my uniform.

Even the time the 8oz bottle clogged and the top fell off and purple sprayed everywhere <g> Granted I washed my stuff w/ oxyclean which I wouldn't do with a bag but I worry about color shifting or fading.

 

Thanks

Holly

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Holly,

 

If you are cooking the dye it should be safe. Maybe make a little test square just to be sure. Crochet a hot pad and felt it, something like that. Then you'd know and wouldn't get disappointed after spending a lot of time working on something bigger.

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Thanks. I am cooking it so in short term I think it will be ok. I was just wondering about the long term colors.

 

I think I'm going to try to go with pre-colored yarn when possible and save the dying for something special. It's fun, but just undoing the skein and re-rolling into balls after takes a ton of time.

 

Holly

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<blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>It's fun, but just undoing the skein and re-rolling into balls after takes a ton of time.<hr></blockquote>

 

You're not kidding! <img border=0 src="http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/laugh.gif" />

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Guest KnottyMouse

Thanks for the color chart ! I picked Watermelon-Cherry, Grape, and "Raspberry Reaction" that says its blue.. I also bought a 8 oz skein of Lion Brand Fishermans wool at the store today -- So, I'm all set up for a Koolaid yarn bath!

 

Mouse

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Here's a link to where the chart came from, with her explanation of the chart: www.thepiper.com/fiberart/koolaid/colorchart.html

 

Looks to me that each side represents a different yarn. At the top of each side is a "natural," that is, the color yarn she started with. Each of the two kinds of yarn were dyed in the various colors of Kool-Aid listed down the middle.

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Guest SamplerLady

Food coloring, Easter Egg, Kool Aid dyeing are not exact sciences. Often one will come out with multicolored yarn or wool. And it's very difficult to get the same color a second time. There are a lot of variables in it: pH of the water, amount of water, amount of dye stuff, amound of wool or yarn, temp of the water..... So, like fulling, it's best to approach this as an adventure and a "one of a kind" experiment.

 

These dyes are just about as color fast as any commerical dye. They will fade over time in direct sun light, but are pretty color fast for regular use. Dyes will sometimes bleed when washed.

 

Citric acid added to dye baths will help keep color uniform. If you want to have a marvelous varigated yarn, use Wilton's purple paste food coloring and vinegar in the dye bath. Use about a half container of Wilton's to about a gallon of HOT (just at boiling) water (turn off heat! do not boil wool) with about a quarter cup of vinegar added. Be sure to stir the food coloring well as it will not just "dissolve" like Kool Aid does. Add yarn or wool and push down to submerge. Let stand till water is cool or overnight. Remove wool and gently rinse. Don't agitate during dyeing or rinsing as it may felt the yarn or wool. Share result with the rest of us! :))

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From what I've read (haven't tried it) is that kool aid/food coloring doesn't work on cotton. It might stain it some but doesn't hold the color like wool/other animal fibers do.

 

Rit dye should work on cotton though. I have some white cotton tots I want to play with sometime after I do the 9,382 other projects in my head.

 

Holly

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