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Not a Quality Craft!

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Don't get me wrong but I thought that is what an artist did. That they were Someone who Could take something and make it more than what it was.

RH to me is one of the finest yarns there are out there. It has all the qualities I would want in a lot of things. Durability and beautiful colors (that do stand up to the test of time). I am not a child, but I think it would be much nicer to wear something made from such as RH than a delicate designer yarn. At least it would still be here in 10 years to be able to see it in all it's glory.

 

You would have to give Red Heart it's just dues, because it truely deserves it in my book, and I am not ashamed to be one to say so. So many expensive yarns can not stand the time test, let alone color staying power. And yes, true some do. But you honestly can not dis good old Red Heart. It is all up to the artist (and yes, crochet is an art, not a craft nor is it a hobby in my book) as to the finished piece, whether or not it is a good work or just plain crap.

 

Got to give you an example of how good the old RH is. One of the first (acctually the very second thing) things I ever made was the good old sc ripple for my Mom. Took me about a month to do, but I wanted so to make one for her (big afghan). It was done in (would be considered vintage now) RH varigated colors. It covered her double bed and hang over at the foot and sides about 6 inches. Well, my Mom past away this past March. Before she got to where she could not function, she surprised me here one day. I'll bet you will never guess what she sent to me in the mail. You see, I would always joke around with her as she was getting up in years about how I wanted all her riches when she left this old world. But I would always end with, all I would ever really want Mom is the afghan that I made for you way back when I first learned how to crochet. Yes, you guessed it. What was in the box was that (27 years old now) afghan that I made her. She said that she wanted to make sure that I got it, it had meant so much to her. And it was to me one of the most treasured memories for me of my first big crochet project, Something special for my Mom.

 

It had not frayed, snagged, tore, come apart or any thing of that nature. It was, and still is very much intacked as the month it was made. She traveled a lot, and she use to lay it out in the back of her van, lay her clothes on it, and then wrap over them with it. When she would come up to Kentucky to deer hunt each year, it would be with her (wrapped around her clothes in the back of the van) and she always sleep under it at the camp. In her last 10 years after my step Dad pasted, she got to where she slept on the couch, and it was her covers. You can fold it in half, and still be covered from head to toe, nice and comfy cozy warm. That is where it resides now, on my sofa where I tend to sleep a lot as I have back problems that flare up now and again, and it is also my closeness to my Mom when I cuddle up under it now.

 

What does that say as to Red Hearts quality? Says a lot for me.

 

I am very glad that I could not afford so called better quality yarn back then. I might not be able to sleep under my Mom's afghan now if I had bought something other than good old Red Heart.

 

Please don't be offended by what I just wrote, but if everyone would just come back down to earth, and tell the truth, RH does deserve a higher standing that what it gets these days.

 

The fact is that we have two art forms basically competing (crochet and knit), and there should be no competition. My Mom always said that when someone made less of something you do, it was always rooted it the fact that they wish they could do the same, and it was jealeuosy of your ability. So I have always took that to heart (at age 52, I see that she was right).

 

I know in my heart that crocheters and knitters alike are all true artist in there own right. Respect that in each other, and share in the joy of their talent and acomplishments with them, don't make it less than what is (is hurtful, and could be taken as jealeousy).

 

It is not so much in the yarn that you use, as it is in what you can do with that yarn that makes the finished piece something of quality (and the memories and good feelings you get of what you have accomplished). There can never be enough money for that part of our work, so never expect it. Don't place a money value on your finished pieces, then you truely do lose out on what it is all about. You know exactly what I mean, being fellow artist in the fields of crochet and knit. You can see it in a lot of your work that you show here on the forum.

 

 

Not meant to offend, but had to say my part.

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i'm going to have to agree with so many of you. RH and other 4 ply worsted weight yarns defiently get a bad rap, and people who think that only the "good yarns" make something of quality are so off the mark, i will give you a example of this, one day for my class(yes i am a fiber artist and also teacher) i was required to make a shawl with this yarn that was almost 16.00 a ball. well since i really did not like working with it i only did it because i was told to, but then i decided to make the same shawl with rh in a rich bright color. well you can imagine the bosses suprise when the expensive yarn fell apart . was not even from washing it and certainly wasn't because i did not make it right, it was plain crappy yarn that left pieces of thread and fluffy pieces of yarn all over the place. i then showed my boss the other one i had made, guess which one i taught the class for. who says that expensive yarns are good quality, is no different than the gas companys telling us that regular grade will not work in most of our cars while promoting the more expensive premium gas. i know there are cars that only will run good on the mid grade or better, but the majority of them run on reg.the same can be said for a grade of yarn. cheaper yarn is not a sign of bad yarn and i certainly don't think the more expensive yarns are any better because they cost more. so many of us can not afford $15.00 $20.00 skeins of yarn. we have families to feed and bills to pay, i am fortunet enough to be able to use some of the more expensive yarns. note i said more expensive not better yarns, while there are some things i make that will look different when made with red heart , or a higher priced yarn does not make it cheap yarn. or bad yarn. and also i agree with the person who said what about people who are allergic as so many of us are. well if you look at most of the more expensive yarns. other than wool and other natural fibers , what are they made out of? plastic same as red heart k enough said. i know you probably did not mean to say more expensive yarns are the only thing one should use( at least i would hope not) and also some people who think that knitting is so much better, says who? knitters?:think :think :lol :lol :lol i do both so i can say equally i enjoy them both, although my first choice is crochet,. i actually learned to knit first and have made many items of quality, but i have crocheted more:devil :devil :devil :devil stepping off my:soap and say to all of you, please have tolerence when speaking of these kind of things

 

i know that people have a issue and i do too when someone tells me that what they do is better and what they use is better. is only a snob would actually think this.:eek :eek k now can we all go back to crocheting?:hug :hug :hug

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Acrylic yarn is a type of plastic. Do a burn test on it sometime, take a piece of yarn and light it on fire. It will melt. If you are wearing it and are in a fire it will melt to your body. Acrylic is a petrolium product, as the price of oil rises, so will the cost of acrylic yarn.

I stated before that I use acrylic yarn when it is appropriate. I have made many afghans for gifts like most of you. They were acrylic.

 

I don't mean to hurt feelings, just trying to get you to see that the peception of crochet as inferior COULD have something to do with the materials used. It is a bias of mine, it is my opinion.

You are entitled to your opinion and can make whatever you like out of whatever you like.

I still say that your time and talent are worth using the best quality materials that you can afford to, and appropriate for what you are making. How can that be offensive?

 

Deb

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I guess we're all a little disappointed that some comments could be read as reinforcing the exact same stereotype we're trying to fight. Like Goldi, I only have myself and 5 animal mouths to feed (which is basically like feeding a child or two, if weights of all the animals are totaled and compared to a child of the same weight and his/her food consumption and associated medical bills) and thus perhaps have a little more disposable income than many of the folks here, but if I spent $25/skein, much less $50 or $75, every Scottish and Dutch ancestor of mine would roll in their respective graves and haunt me. We are all entitled to our opinions, and frankly, I find exorbitant prices like that outrageous. Yes, art is art and worth its price, but there's a heck of a lot of bad art (paint, fiber, photo, literature, etc.) out there, too, that is not worthy of the price attached to it. But just as there are many variables that go into pricing fiber art and luxury yarns, there are many variables that go into the decisions we make on what we select to create our pieces with (I don't make art--I make no pretensions; I haven't the talent; I make useful pieces, which I think is equally important), which have a different audience than a serious fiber artist. Its all about venue, audience, location, personal situation, and, sometimes, getting away with what you can. I do a lot of charity work, so acrylics are my friend. My knitting friend (and I knit, too) likes to buy fancy yarns--she has a lot of individual balls of yarn that are awfully pretty to stroke, but she doesn't have enough to do anything with them. Maybe she's buying beyond her budget, who knows. But I certainly won't say anything against anyone who wants to spend $25 or $50 on a 50-gram skein. Just as I would hope no one would say anything against my retired mom spending some of her fixed income on acrylics to make blankets for Project Linus (her October/November output numbers 16!), blankets which I think many stressed kids and parents find as beautiful as a luxurious item made from spun gold. If I had that kind of money, though, I'd probably just buy a lot more of my favorite acrylics. My cats sleep on my clothes, and removing cat spit or dog slobber from a $300 scarf just doesn't sound like fun.

 

On a lighter note, your comment about flameable plastics made me laugh--I'm a field scientist, and once on a project in New Mexico I worked with someone who used to set various things on fire. Yes, this did concern me. One day he lit those little triangular snacks (can I use the brand name without getting hit with a lawsuit? How about you supply the vowels: B_gl_s)--and they melted!! They didn't burn, they melted!! I hadn't had one in about 15 years before that, and I sure as heck haven't eaten one since. Just goes to show that you never know what you're eating. And that acrylics show up where you least expect them.

 

Happy hooking to us all! :hook

 

Patty

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I'm sort of ready to see this topic die, since I see some very big fundamental differences of opinion.

 

That having been said, however, I just want to clarify a point that quality yarns do not cost $50/ball or skein. Not even $25. Hell, I'm a certified, self-titled "yarn snob" and I just shuddered last week when I paid $9 for a hank of gorgeous Noro yarn. I know $9 might be more than many are willing to pay, but I just wanted to say that it's not hard to find high quality, natural fiber yarns for $7 for a 190-yard skein (just thinking about the Lamb's Pride worsted I bought to go with the Noro).

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>> I am just advocating that you expand your yarn choices. <<

 

That's a nice idea and I guess that it may work for some people, but ones like me who are seriously allergic to any kind of wool (that includes the mohair and angora) have to stick with the simpler yarn fibers, like acrylic or cotton. Fortunately for us, the acrylics have come a long way in the many beautiful finishes and weights -- I get sooo many compliments on the items I have used the Homespun or Jiffy or Light & Lofty yarns to complete. Interestingly, most people thought they were some type of wool. :-)

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Got to say this. How can a yarn that made an awesome ripple afghan 27 years ago that is just as pretty and intacked as when it was made, and the colors still true be an inferior yarn. Did you not read that in my post? I am so sorry, but you have got it all wrong on the yarn making folks look down on crochet work, it is the work, not the yarn. I see all kinds of tacky stuff made, but it is not the yarn, it is the crocheter, or the knitters actual work.

 

 

QUOTE=dudleyspinner]Acrylic yarn is a type of plastic. Do a burn test on it sometime, take a piece of yarn and light it on fire. It will melt. If you are wearing it and are in a fire it will melt to your body. Acrylic is a petrolium product, as the price of oil rises, so will the cost of acrylic yarn.

I stated before that I use acrylic yarn when it is appropriate. I have made many afghans for gifts like most of you. They were acrylic.

 

I don't mean to hurt feelings, just trying to get you to see that the peception of crochet as inferior COULD have something to do with the materials used. It is a bias of mine, it is my opinion.

You are entitled to your opinion and can make whatever you like out of whatever you like.

I still say that your time and talent are worth using the best quality materials that you can afford to, and appropriate for what you are making. How can that be offensive?

 

Deb

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Even that can be too high for some of us, But I would have to admit, would be a little closer to my buget.

I'm sort of ready to see this topic die, since I see some very big fundamental differences of opinion.

 

That having been said, however, I just want to clarify a point that quality yarns do not cost $50/ball or skein. Not even $25. Hell, I'm a certified, self-titled "yarn snob" and I just shuddered last week when I paid $9 for a hank of gorgeous Noro yarn. I know $9 might be more than many are willing to pay, but I just wanted to say that it's not hard to find high quality, natural fiber yarns for $7 for a 190-yard skein (just thinking about the Lamb's Pride worsted I bought to go with the Noro).

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Trendy items that I will only wear for a season or two I make of cheap yarn. When making something I plan on wearing for a few years - like a Chanel type jacket- I'll pay whatever it takes to get the look I want. Same with fabric when I sew. I just don't want to spend a lot of money on something that will see minimal wear and will end up being donated in a year or two. And if you want your afghan to last thru several washings and hard use, RH or Caron is the only way to go.

 

My other thought is not so much about expensive vs cheap yarn, but using the appropriate weight yarn for the project. Some styles look best in worsted, some in fingering, others cry out for a nice chunky hand spun wool or a slinky rayon blend.

 

And I happen to LIKE crocheted potholders. I've made several for personal use. What else is there to do with leftover cotton yarn?

 

I love the comment about the "Church of the Scorched Hands". LOL.

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I have to say that I am getting quite irritated with the way crocheters are treated. I stopped going to this particular yarn store do to the comments one "knitter" made to me.

 

I was looking at yarn and the lady asked me what I was making. I told her that I was crocheting a scarf. Well, she looked at me like I had 8 heads and then said, " Maybe you should try your hand at knitting. It is so much better than crocheting and you use less yarn". I turned to her and said, " No thanks, I love crocheting and I like that I can pass down this beautiful art to my girls. Besides, knitting isn't all that intersting to me."

 

I put the yarn down and walked out. I haven't been back since.

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Hrm. I love making potholders because they allow you to experiment. I love the diversity of them, my mum probably has 50 different pairs. :manyheart

 

And as with everything else, no amount of fancy yarn will make an ugly pattern look nice. You buy what you can afford and make the most of it. I have often seen boring, unimaginative things made with expensive yarns, sometimes they're even on display at yarn shops. Things that come off more as prestige projects than crafts, really. I'd take a interesting object made with cheap yarn over those things, any day. It all comes down to making appropriate yarn choices for the item you're working on. A high price does not on any level equate quality or a good choice for your item, or make you a better crafter. I live in a suburb, where the only local yarnstore stocks up on discontinued yarns that they bought cheap from the factory, and sell them at reduced prices. I rarely pay full price for my yarn. (Darn, I'm moving to another city next month!)

 

Besides, I don't think knitted items are automatically made from better yarns, I dare you to check out second hand clothing stores. I've owned plenty of knitted acrylic sweaters. :P

 

Everything else aside, I'm not sure crocheted items are necessarily picked on more than knitted ones...I think more people knit than crochet, but I can seem to remember plenty of comic strips that feature the dreaded knitted sweater from aunt Oda, with mismatched sleeves and a turtleneck that'll cover your nose. But maybe that's different on my side of the pond. :)

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I was at our local Art Museum's craft fair yesterday. It's a juried show and they have very nice things - most out of my price range. I wore my Knifty Knitter Fun Fur plus Red Heart scarf and got a compliment from one of the guys at a fiber weaving booth. He was very sincere and asked what kind of yarn I used and where I bought my yarn. When I said Michaels, he said, "Oh, I don't think of them for yarn." I seemed to have opened up a new place for him to go. We also discussed the rising price of mohair.

 

In various stalls there were Fun Fur scarves (or other such novelty yarn) and such. There was also a great stall with hand dyed, homespun yarn which I would have loved to get, but didn't.

 

The thing that really got me was someone telling me once that since crocheting took less time than knitting, you weren't putting as much love into it. :think

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I agree 100% with you. And, back to the main sudject, is our potholder brigade ready now to send some of our finest to that church :lol? You can Count me in!!!

Trendy items that I will only wear for a season or two I make of cheap yarn. When making something I plan on wearing for a few years - like a Chanel type jacket- I'll pay whatever it takes to get the look I want. Same with fabric when I sew. I just don't want to spend a lot of money on something that will see minimal wear and will end up being donated in a year or two. And if you want your afghan to last thru several washings and hard use, RH or Caron is the only way to go.

 

My other thought is not so much about expensive vs cheap yarn, but using the appropriate weight yarn for the project. Some styles look best in worsted, some in fingering, others cry out for a nice chunky hand spun wool or a slinky rayon blend.

 

And I happen to LIKE crocheted potholders. I've made several for personal use. What else is there to do with leftover cotton yarn?

 

I love the comment about the "Church of the Scorched Hands". LOL.

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I think we should all take that caveat against "not quality crafts" to make some fabulous and creative potholders!

 

Francesca! Fabulous! Making lemonade out of a lemon! :cheer

 

I was feeling pretty ticked off and you set me straight! now, to make some nice potholders!

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The thing that really got me was someone telling me once that since crocheting took less time than knitting, you weren't putting as much love into it. :think

 

I am constantly amazed at just how stupid some people can be. :angry

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AMEN!!! Good for you :h5.

By the way, I was just looking in at your itsy.com site and those are some very nice Crochet pieces. Be proud of them. Now there is your quality workmanship :hook.

I have to say that I am getting quite irritated with the way crocheters are treated. I stopped going to this particular yarn store do to the comments one "knitter" made to me.

 

I was looking at yarn and the lady asked me what I was making. I told her that I was crocheting a scarf. Well, she looked at me like I had 8 heads and then said, " Maybe you should try your hand at knitting. It is so much better than crocheting and you use less yarn". I turned to her and said, " No thanks, I love crocheting and I like that I can pass down this beautiful art to my girls. Besides, knitting isn't all that intersting to me."

 

I put the yarn down and walked out. I haven't been back since.

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But then, on a more serious note, I'm thinking of my 83 year old grandmother who has put herself into a tailspin this year to make things for her church's fall bazaar. She is failing and having a hard time remembering things, so following a pattern is pretty much out of the question for her. She just keeps thinking she should make something and has managed a handful of small items (snowflakes and flower pins). I wonder how she would have felt if her church had told her they didn't want any of the crocheted items she had worked so hard on to finish. Now I'm even more thankful that her things were appreciated when she submitted them.

 

This is what angers me the most. It's not that they don't like crochet--they probably don't, but who cares what they think? Like I've got time to stress over the opinions of the ignorant :neener --it's the fact that they are disrespecting the efforts people put into their crafts--any craft. Those people are not only hurting the feelings of those who want to help, but also denying them the chance to help. My grandma would make things for her church bazaar and it would have broken her heart if they were flung back in her face because they weren't good enough, or cool enough, or hip enough, or fancy enough.

 

This is a selfish, narrow-minded attitude that sucks me right back to the dark days of Junior High when inflicting psychic pain was the hobby of the popular kids. It's an unworthy attitude for any mature adult, but it's unforgivable coming from those who call themselves Christian.

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My grandma would make things for her church bazaar and it would have broken her heart if they were flung back in her face because they weren't good enough, or cool enough, or hip enough, or fancy enough.

 

That's the thing today though is that people are just soooooo rude sometimes. It boggles my mind how inconsiderate of other people's feelings some people can be.

 

What annoys me a lot is how some people who do fiber arts -- usually knitting, and I'm a knitter too -- are so down on "uncool" and "unhip" crocheted items. These people are usually very feminist and I think it is really hypocritical of them to put down the potholders and yes, air freshener cozies, that their great aunts worked so hard to make just because what they make isn't trendy and fabulous. :think:think:think

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Wow,, I just put down my project came over to read a bit while I ate and man oh man.............

 

I know people love crochet gifts I have given been doing it for years and all gifts have be so enjoyed. I even know of a family member still has a pair of pot holders I made years ago and thinks they still so pretty. M 30 year old children still enjoy my crochet for them aswell. I remember learn to crochet yes its potholders 101 but then you give to someone as a child they are so thrilled you made it for them. I did teach my daughters to crochet although one took up quilting and the other shows intrest to relearn crochet. My point we teach our children hopefully they also may want to crochet a potholder for a church project would they be turned down. The gift of giving of making of helping of volenteering time for a potholder all starts here. As child crocheters Im sure we all started out this way this is why it is so offensive this thing.

Then enters the yarn snobs well I have used redheart for years and as many have said I just cannot spend 9 dollars for a skien of yarn when I need 7 of them to compleat a project its out of the question as I always have many projects going on. I think beautifull things are made from acrylics and never thought about the fire problem either that has been brought up here as well.

What happens to the wool when you put a match to that? And another thing

Lots people can't wear wool it also itches..

Im down for sending truck loads of potholders to that church...

Then they will turn around and sell em all saying how wonderfull people are

blah blah blah.............

headache here now for sure and Im bummed out

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One announcement of a church craft fair bragged "Quality crafts only, No Crocheted Potholders."

 

Just from a marketing point of view, isn't this dumb? Are they absolutely certain that their potential customers will find crocheted potholders so awful? It just seems as though the person writing the ad wanted to get a "dig" in. How sad. :ohdear

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I volunteer as a docent at an historical museum. Our docents are all ages. We have a charming little gift shop, "Emporium", that looks like its circa 1876-1900 which is the era of the museum artifacts themselves. Anyway...we have a "docent table"...handcrafts made by our docents and all profits go right to the museum. Ok, granted, some of the stuff is a little cheesy, like placemats that are collaged with pictures off of old greeting cards,etc. But there are some adorable things too, and many crocheted items!!! And they SELL!

Since we all dress in historical costume, lots of us wear shawls when its cold. I got lots of compliments on one I made,and agreed to make one for our Silent Auction at the annual holiday luncheon. And guess what? It got the MOST number of bids!!! Now I'm getting requests for more! I've since found some vintage crochet patterns for that era, little crocheted capelets and such that would be perfect with our costumes, and hope to sell some to our docents!

Anyway, crochet is HOT where I live...So. Calif....look in the "Anthropologie" catalogs, and other trendy stores...

I think knitting is boring! I've learned, and have a scarf in the works, but I'm bored with just purling or knitting!! Give me crochet anytime!

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Some people think crocheting is only a granny in the rocking chair hobby. I just came from dinner with some of my girlfriends. I wore a shrug that I made and I was getting lots of compliments on it. When I told them I made it they looked at me like there was something wrong with me. One said, ok when did you turn into an old lady. Well, I am a granny and proud of it. And they would love to wear one of my handmade shrugs. But after tonight, I will only gift handmade items to those that truly appreciate what they are getting.

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I am a spinner, I most certainly appreciate -and use- high end yarn when I feel it's appropriate. Sometimes that means animal fiber and sometimes it means manmade fibers. I don't consider myself a yarn "snob" because I have nothing against using good 'ol Red Heart when it's the right yarn for what I'm making.

 

You know, the only place I personally come across the crochet vs. knitting snobbery is online. I'm not saying it never happens out in the real world, but most of my face to face encounters with knitters is positive. I belong to a spinning group (we're not as formal as a guild...) where the majority of the ladies knit...very well. They knit beautiful things with luscious yarns. I am so envious sometimes because I want to knit, but I just can't get the hang of it. And you know what??? They are envious of my crocheting!!!! They think it's much harder than knitting and really admire *me* for being able to crochet so well.

 

I wore this shawl th_noroshawlbacksm.jpg

to the MD Sheep & Wool festival, someplace chock full of fiber art connoisseurs. I got so many compliments on it, complete strangers coming up to pick up a corner for a closer look (now, where else in the world would that be ok? :lol) and exclaiming 'Oh! It's crocheted!" yet they *didn't* recoil in horror. Now granted, that shawl is made with Noro & Trendsetter yarns, but it is crocheted.

 

Are there stupid people out there in the world that will make stupid assumptions about crochet? Of course. But they probably make stupid assumptions about knitting too. I find most of the general public doesn't know the difference between the two anyway and think anything crafty is frumpy. The arguments online...well...some people just like to argue. My suggestion would be to spend less time on the crochet/knit rivalry and more time showing the world what spectacular things can be done with crochet....with whatever yarn you feel comfortable using.

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i guess you have been lucky not to have had to deal with these snobs. but ya know something, i think they are jealous :lol :lol is because they do not know how to crochet. maybe i should invite them to join my class:eek :eek :eek never mind:D :D :D

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