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Yarn Bobbins


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I'm low tech and zero cost...I wrap yarn around pieces of scrap cardboard or folded paper...if I have multiple bobbins 'going' at once, I clip the unused ones with a bobby pin or paper clip so they don't unravel.  Edited to add a pic of bobbins used on a swatch experiment a few years ago, the bobbins were for the stripes on the hat, the other colors I just stranded (was supposed to be tapestry but I missed that detail until I was mostly done, oops)

 

Neva Hat In Process.JPG

Edited by Granny Square
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These are the ones I use and I even have some of the square ones they show. 

Amazon.com: NX Garden Large Yarn Bobbin Spool Thread Knitting Sewing Crochet Weave Winder Tool 10PCS Mixture Colour As you can see from this picture.

 

I have seen people use the cloths pins that you squeese at the top.  I have also seen the cardboard stuff like Grannie square uses.  I am not sure what the ones you are asking about look like.  I just looked at the picture of the ones you mean.  I tried them once and did not like the way they worked.  You could not put much on them and sometimes they would open for no reason.  I gave them away.

Begals Afghan (2).JPG

 

Edited by Tampa Doll
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2 hours ago, Granny Square said:

I'm low tech and zero cost...I wrap yarn around pieces of scrap cardboard or folded paper...if I have multiple bobbins 'going' at once, I clip the unused ones with a bobby pin or paper clip so they don't unravel.  Edited to add a pic of bobbins used on a swatch experiment a few years ago, the bobbins were for the stripes on the hat, the other colors I just stranded (was supposed to be tapestry but I missed that detail until I was mostly done, oops)

 

Neva Hat In Process.JPG

I've done something similar when I was using fingering yarn for hats, mittens.  I found a video where a gal makes dog bone shape cut out cardboard bobbins.  Like that idea as it includes slits on both sides to secure the yarn.

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2 hours ago, Tampa Doll said:

These are the ones I use and I even have some of the square ones they show. 

Amazon.com: NX Garden Large Yarn Bobbin Spool Thread Knitting Sewing Crochet Weave Winder Tool 10PCS Mixture Colour As you can see from this picture.

 

I have seen people use the cloths pins that you squeese at the top.  I have also seen the cardboard stuff like Grannie square uses.  I am not sure what the ones you are asking about look like.  I just looked at the picture of the ones you mean.  I tried them once and did not like the way they worked.  You could not put much on them and sometimes they would open for no reason.  I gave them away.

Begals Afghan (2).JPG

 

I found a website explaining using cheap extra large Dollar General clothespins.  My projects won't be large enough for clipping to the project but I did like being able to clip the yarn so it doesn't fall off/unravel.  Oh my, I don't know How you crochet with all those bobbins not getting in the way, tangling.  Especially on turns.  What holds the yarn from coming off as your working along the row?  Are you clipping it?  If I just let it hang as I go will it stay put?

The clothespin site mentioned she use to use the toilet paper cardboard as bobbins.  I'll collect some of those and apply the dog bone bobbin info for extras.  The slits in keeping the yarn put.  😄

 

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I used the Boye ones for years and then they became impossible to find.  I sometimes find Hobby Lobby's brand.  I bought a dollar pencil box a few years back to store them in because I don't use them regularly and I kept losing them and they are hard to replace.  The neon colored box is hard to miss.

DH made me some cardboard ones using the Boye ones as models.  I have a couple that I didn't destroy that I kept to remind me what a sweetheart he is for doing crazy stuff like that for me.

I like these "models" because you can generally get them to "lock" the yarn close to the end of the bobbin so it decreases the tangles.

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3 hours ago, NCcountrygal said:

I found a website explaining using cheap extra large Dollar General clothespins.  My projects won't be large enough for clipping to the project but I did like being able to clip the yarn so it doesn't fall off/unravel.  Oh my, I don't know How you crochet with all those bobbins not getting in the way, tangling.  Especially on turns.  What holds the yarn from coming off as your working along the row?  Are you clipping it?  If I just let it hang as I go will it stay put?

The clothespin site mentioned she use to use the toilet paper cardboard as bobbins.  I'll collect some of those and apply the dog bone bobbin info for extras.  The slits in keeping the yarn put.  😄

 

Actually if you look at the top of the bobbin, you will see it is closed, it only has a small slit in the top.  They do not unravel and as for getting tangles, they are easier to untangle then yarn balls or cones that are cotton yarn.

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15 hours ago, Bailey4 said:

I used the Boye ones for years and then they became impossible to find.  I sometimes find Hobby Lobby's brand.  I bought a dollar pencil box a few years back to store them in because I don't use them regularly and I kept losing them and they are hard to replace.  The neon colored box is hard to miss.

DH made me some cardboard ones using the Boye ones as models.  I have a couple that I didn't destroy that I kept to remind me what a sweetheart he is for doing crazy stuff like that for me.

I like these "models" because you can generally get them to "lock" the yarn close to the end of the bobbin so it decreases the tangles.

I saw some plastic ones listed as Boye bobbins.  The comments said they were brittle and prone to breaking.  

Appreciate the feedback and your experience.  

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4 hours ago, NCcountrygal said:

I saw some plastic ones listed as Boye bobbins.  The comments said they were brittle and prone to breaking.  

Appreciate the feedback and your experience.  

I have never had one break of any of the brands I've bought over the years.  I tend to buy the larger ones so they fit more yarn on them.  I've seen people try and use the smaller ones and over stuff them and that could be an issue.  I've picked up a few of the smaller ones when they were the only ones I could find but I also fill according to their size.  I try to use them for smaller areas because otherwise you end up refilling and thus having more ends to weave in when done.

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I agree with Brenda.  I use the smaller ones for small areas, or thread.  As for tangling, if you roll them up to the project, there is no tangling.  If they do tangle, it is easier to untangle than balls of yran.

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