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What does this mean


Acidburn
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Welcome to the 'ville!

1 sc in next 3 sc means make 1 sc in each of the next 3 sc

sc 2 tog  (tog='together') means turning 2 stitches into 1 (it is a decrease) .  Insert the hook in the first stitch, pull up a loop, insert hook in the next stitch, pull up a loop, yarn over and pull thru both loops.

I assume your line was " *1 sc in next 3 sc, 2 sc tog*, repeat from * to * 6 more times " .  It means to do the stuff between the asterisks a total of 7 times - do it once, then repeat it 6 more.  An instruction surrounded by asterisks denotes a repeat.

Here is a guide to reading a crochet pattern (US terms) that you might find helpful; there is a menu on the right side for other good stuff.  This site is sponsored, written by and adhered to by US companies that supply yarn, pattern publications, hooks and knitting needles.

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Hmm.  I made a guess based on 2 things:  (1) it was the only thing that made any sense based on the words you typed, and (2) - this is a nerdy reason, but in  another craft site (Ravelry) if you type an asterisk it makes the following text italic, and if you type another asterisk, it 'turns off' the italics--I am sure Ravelry  isn't the only site where something like this happens, including blogs.  On Ravelry, there is some way to make the computer not treat the asterisk as 'code'.

I'm old enough to remember before word processing was WYSIWYG ('what you see [on the screen] is what you get' [when you print it out]), so a symbol like an asterisk causing unexpected programming to kick in doesn't sound to odd to me.

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It's from  https://crochetandknitting.com/mensock/ and here is a few examples copied right from the pattern...

 

1 sc in next 4 sc, 2 sc tog, repeat from * to * 6 more times, ss to join, ch 1, turn.

RND 32 - 1 sc in next 4 sc, 2 sc tog, repeat from * to * 4 more times, ss to join, ch 1, join.

RND 34 - 1 sc in next 3 sc, 2 sc tog, repeat from * to * 4 more times, ss to join, ch 1, turn.

 

I think you'll get the point now

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Posted (edited)

Interesting, I did a search on the phrase repeat from * to * on that page, it comes up 16 times and every occurrence has an instruction in italics right before it!

So, I am not saying there aren't other possibilities, but it is mighty suspicious; if I were making this I'd assume the phrases in italics were to be treated as if they were surrounded by asterisks, for a while at least, and see if the outcome seems to be working out as I'd expect it should.

Is there a photo of the socks somewhere??  And just skimming, and speaking of 'suspicious', I think this person may have stolen this pattern text from elsewhere, there are bits that are not part of the pattern that appear to have originally been links, but are no longer links.  And scroll down, there is a bunch of nonsense at the bottom, that are just stitch counts, and comments 'see picture at left' and there are no pictures.

I think you need to find another pattern, this one is 100% fishy, and if it was complicated enough to need a lot of photos to illustrate the steps, and the photos aren't there....this is not a good sign.  

Edited by Granny Square
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Posted (edited)

OK, that's good that it made sense up until this point, but - I don't want to scare you - sock heels are the 'hardest' part, if you have never made socks before.  They really aren't difficult, they are just unusual, a sort of thing that a lack of a photo for at least the finished item is not going to help .  

Holy cow, I just looked at different types of (knit) sock heels, one site has 16 different types.

Oh wow, just saw the next post - the cuff looks great, and it looks like you are on the right track for the heel.   The only thing I'm unsure of, it looks like there is a ridge between the cuff and the heel - not sure that looks right?.  

Edited by Granny Square
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Posted (edited)

The ridge is just the bottom chains from the grey..

 can anyone help understand this folding..

ROW 15 - 1 sc in next 7 sc, 2 sc tog twice, fold heel in half with wrong side of heel facing you, (See picture on left.) ss the next sc to the 7th sc on this Row, ss the next sc to the 6th sc of this Row, ss the next sc to the 5th sc of this Row, ss the next sc to the 4th sc of this Row, ss the next sc to the 3rd sc of this Row, ss the next sc to the 2nd sc of this Row, ss the last sc to the 1st sc of this Row, change to blue yarn, ch 1, turn heel to the right side. Note: If you are still having a problem with the heel, Click Here to see a hand drawn illustration on how to do it. It is for the baby socks, however it will still show you how it's done.

Edited by Acidburn
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Posted (edited)

Gotcha on the chains, that makes sense (I think, for the top half of the foot, right?).

And now I am at a disadvantage.  Your heel is the crochet equivalent of one of the link with 16 types between # 10 and 16 - these are 'short row' types, just pointing this out for the shape it will be making, a sort of diagonal 'seam', and 2 halves which sort of look like segments of a beach ball.  This is the type I'm not as familiar with as the #1-9 heel flap types, which is the sort I've made a whole bunch of pairs of (knit, but the structure concept is the same for either knit or crochet socks).

Short rows are where you either start in the center of a 'spot' and make ever widening rows across the center, or the opposite - start wide, and the rows get shorter until you reach the center.  A short row heel is going to do both, because there are 2 'halves'; the narrow parts will be at the beginning and the end (top and bottom), the wide part in the middle.

Since I know what it is called, I'll play it safe and steer you to you tube to look for a tutorial for more expert advice than mine; there are several if you look for 'how to crochet a short row heel', hopefully that will help you see in a general way what the pattern is telling you.

Edited by Granny Square
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Posted (edited)

Oh dear, sorry you lost all that work. I'll take a look and report back.  edit, man's sizing as before, right? And US size 4 (medium, worsted) weight, right?

Edited by Granny Square
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The yarn weight really narrowed down the possibilities quite a bit, in addition to looking for something that had several sizes that hopefully will  cover the size of your original men's size pattern.  These patterns at yarn companies and pattern publishers should be tech edited and hopefully accurate.

"Joan's Socks" on Lion Brand site - written as 1 size but instructions to change stitch count for other sizes.  This is a modified heel flap style, but without the heel flap (it is there, it is just under the heel not in back as usual, but it retains the gusset and heel turn aspects of that style.  All that might sound a little Greek; I've knitted 1 pair like that.  The gusset is the sort of triangle shape by the ankle.  You can download the pattern for free, you may have to register with Lion Brand; the $ amount is if you buy a kit.  Here is the Ravelry page, you can see what someone's project looks like rather than a drawing.

An Annie's Attic pattern Snug Socks, comes in different sizes; sort of a heel flap variation I guess.

Sporty Footies, Annies Attic, heel flap -- just needs more cuff, comes in different sizes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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