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Is Knitting Easy?!


LoveCrochetKingdom
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Good afternoon,

Hello all my beautiful Knitters and Crocheters. I currently don't knit but would love to try and learn. I have been crocheting for about 10 years so I have a bit of yarn knowledge. I want to make this dress that attached. But don't know if this projects is the best to learn. Who difficult is knitting? How difficult would it be to knit this dress ? This dress is a free pattern in hobbi.com.i share the link just in case someone else loves it and had the skills I lack to make on.  Thank you all 

 

https://hobbii.com/briza-dressScreenshot_20220318-155510.thumb.png.90eb09917df11f6a6bb6266ffb216948.png

Screenshot_20220318-155510.png

Edited by LoveCrochetKingdom
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Hi, I learned to knit and crochet ages and still do both, but for different things; I tend to knit sweaters and sox but crochet most everything else.

I suppose 'which is easier' is a matter of opinion, and how you look at it.  Knitters think crochet is harder (because the stitches are more complex, and you can stick your hook almost anywhere), and crocheters think knitting is harder (because it's less flexible).  My viewpoint:

A knit or purl is about as complicated as a crochet chain stitch, or maybe slip stitch.  Insert needle2 in loop on needle1, yarn over, pull thru a loop and pull the loop off needle 1 and place it on needle 2, repeat.  Over and over.  That's all straight knitting or purling is.  The thing is, most everything else in knitting is a lot more convoluted, because you are constrained by having all your stitches on a needle all the time.  Things that are...a tiny bit complex in crochet, like a bobble, are ridiculously convoluted in knitting (I almost literally fell of my chair laughing when I read how to knit one.)  On the other hand, I think those who only knit are freaked out by the freedom of crochet, you can stick your hook in  all sorts of places to make a stitch, and there are a lot more basic stitches (sc, hdc, dc, etc).

However, on seeing that dress - oh bleep no, I would never consider knitting that.  Reason - It would take forever, on microscopic needles and microscopic thread.  I'd much rather pick a nice slinky fabric and sew it, I probably could have almost cut out the fabric and sewn it up in the time it is taking me to type this post. (kidding, but it wouldn't take more than an afternoon). Have you ever looked closely at the thread used to machine knit T-shirt fabric?  Would you want to crochet a floor length sleeveless 'T-shirt' with thread that fine, with the tiniest doily hook? I doubt that is hand knit--it could be machine knit in minutes at a fraction of the cost than hand knitted offshore.

It is just a tube, all knit in the round, presumably a little shaping at the top area, so not difficult--just would take forever.

Edited by Granny Square
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If you are interested in learning to knit in general, if not for that dress...as I said I learned ages ago (pre-internet) but mostly crocheted for decades, knittinghelp was helpful for me to brush up on what I sort-of-but-not-quite-entirely-remembered  when I picked knitting back up a few years ago.

There are 2 styles of tensioning yarn when knitting that are more 'crochet-friendly' than others - continental, and continental combined.  "Continental' means you tension the yarn using the left hand, I tension the yarn exactly the same in knit as crochet.  I believe knittinghelp shows both combined 'plain' and combined.  (Combined means you wrap the yarn around the needle in different directions for purls than knits - it's the way I learned so I'm used to it, some find it confusing, neither way is better but I find combined purls are easier on my not-quite-so-young-any-more hands...)

 

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If you are just learning to knit, I would not tackle a dress.  Like Granny Square said, it is easier to learn with something simple, larger needles and yarn.

I learned to knit first as a young kid.  I liked using the 2 needles and not the one hook.  I did not learn to crochet till I was about 41.

You may find itawkard using two needles and not one hook.  It also takes patience and practice.  Yes, crocheting has more intricate stitches, but knitting gives you a smoother look, just my opinion.

 

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Thank you. I think I'm going with the idea of buying some like wise fabric for a nice at home slip/dress. Thank you I still want to learn how to knit but will try something more beginner friendly. For now I stick with what I know thank you so much. You have me motivation to learn.  

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You are very welcome!

I just noticed you are in Puerto Rico, and also your poncho picture.  I used to live in Hawaii, have been to Puerto Rico a couple of times in the summer and I imagine the climate is similar to Hawaii in the cooler months--Maybe a shawl would be something to aim at for learning to knit?

Or there's always the tried and true washcloths and pot holders to practice new techniques on...

 

Edited by Granny Square
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Posted (edited)

Hi. I'm Puerto Rican but I moved and now live in chilly western New York. I do love my shawls and wraps though. I'm been to scared to start and learn, the 2 needles confuse me a bit, but I guess it takes practice and patience. But I will get over it and try if i can great,  if not I'll keep trying 😂.

Edited by LoveCrochetKingdom
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Ah!  I learned to knit (and later crochet) after moving from Hawaii to California (San Francisco Bay area) and was 'freezing to death' in the winter which was like 50°F most of the time  :lol, nothing like New York winters I'm sure!  Now I'm in a place where snow actually hits the ground (but rarely, and not much)...it is still a sort of a novelty!

Throwing this out there, my mother taught me to knit (I think she learned how when SHE was a kid, but I never saw her knit before this), and the first project she taught me was a super-simple hat that was just a rectangle whose width was the circumference of my head, the height was tall to gather together at the crown--the edges of the rectangle were sewn together and a pom-pom added to hide the gather.  This might be a good 'practice swatch' for you to learn to knit, I'll see if I can find a pattern.

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