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Perle Cotton Size 5 Thread


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I accidentally didn't read the fine print when I bought some thread...it is labeled Perle Cotton Size 5 but I don't know what the equivalent is in crochet thread. Does anyone know what crochet thread this corresponds to? It looks close to size 20 to me. Thank you! (I saw someone mentioned size 8 perle thread here but not size 5...)

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Here is a blog with an opinion on the sizing,  see right above the comment section.  So size 5 perle is close to 10 crochet thread, size 8 perle closer to size 20 crochet thread.

What are you making?  I make a lot of doilies, pretty much all with #10 thread, and am not really aiming for exact measurements for the end item.  You could probably play with hook sizing; I recently followed a (modern) pattern that called for #10 thread and a #10 hook, which I thought was awfully tiny (I usually grab my #7 hook), but the #10 hook worked nicely (it was a filet pattern), actually I rather liked the look of the slightly tighter filet.

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On 11/9/2021 at 7:49 PM, magicmau5 said:

I accidentally didn't read the fine print when I bought some thread...it is labeled Perle Cotton Size 5 but I don't know what the equivalent is in crochet thread. Does anyone know what crochet thread this corresponds to? It looks close to size 20 to me. Thank you! (I saw someone mentioned size 8 perle thread here but not size 5...)

It’s thicker than size 10. Thinner than 3. It’s my fave thickness for doilies and doll thread patterns I have. With thread the bigger the number the finer, thinner it is. 

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On 11/9/2021 at 5:03 PM, Granny Square said:

Here is a blog with an opinion on the sizing,  see right above the comment section.  So size 5 perle is close to 10 crochet thread, size 8 perle closer to size 20 crochet thread.

What are you making?  I make a lot of doilies, pretty much all with #10 thread, and am not really aiming for exact measurements for the end item.  You could probably play with hook sizing; I recently followed a (modern) pattern that called for #10 thread and a #10 hook, which I thought was awfully tiny (I usually grab my #7 hook), but the #10 hook worked nicely (it was a filet pattern), actually I rather liked the look of the slightly tighter filet.

Thank you for the suggestions. Usually I use size 10 in Aunt Lydia's style. But this time I found a pattern requesting size 5 and hook size 3, it's an antique pattern from the Antique Pattern Library. It's supposed to be a centerpiece and it's a very old pattern so I didn't want to make a mistake and use different thread size since it's already hard making an antique pattern (at least I have found that antique patterns aren't always specific and don't use modern terminology...just raises the difficulty). If it were a regular modern pattern I wouldn't worry about it. I'm still just going to buy regular size 5 crochet thread and use the Perle thread for something else...

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18 hours ago, magicmau5 said:

Oh, I was specifically told that this thread was not sized according to crochet thread size, but in an entirely different system called the Perle system. That was why I asked what the crochet thread equivalent is.

Thread Talk   

Another comparison of thread 

"After writing some time back about floche, a 5-ply non-divisible cotton embroidery thread, I received a lot of inquiries about it: What is it? What’s it used for? How’s it different from other embroidery thread? and so forth. So, using a few photos, I thought I’d draw some comparisons between some commonly known cotton embroidery threads and floche.  For the sake of comparison, I selected two relatively common cotton embroidery threads – DMC stranded cotton and DMC Perle Cotton #5. The floche in the photos is also DMC."

Edited by NCcountrygal
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* #5 pearl/perle cotton is a little thicker than #10 crochet thread, but is suitable for most #10 cotton patterns.
* #8 pearl/perle cotton is about the same as #20 crochet thread.
* #12 pearl/perle cotton is about the same as #40 crochet thread

https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/understanding-crochet-thread-sizes-4053169
"With thread, the higher the number of the thread, the thinner it is. A size 3 in crochet thread sounds small and a size 30 sounds much larger, but a size 3 is going to be a thicker thread than a size 30. As the number of the thread goes up, the thickness goes down."

there are some standard crochet thread sizes.

Size 3 and 5 crochet thread is about as thick as a lightweight yarn, with size 3 being slightly thicker than size 5. If you have trouble learning thread crochet, start with these large sizes of thread.
Size 10 crochet thread is slightly thinner than most yarn, slightly thicker than size 3 or 5 threads. Beginners to thread crochet often find that this is a good size to start with.
Size 20 and 30 crochet thread are common options. Many of the thread crochet patterns that you will find are going to call for one of these two sizes of thread.
People interested in working with even thinner thread will find that it comes in increments of 10 (size 40 to size 100), with the lower numbers being slightly thicker (but still very thin) compared to the highest numbers.

https://crafttribeonline.com/embroidery-thread-101-a-guide-to-types-and-sizes/
Embroidery thread 101: A guide to types and sizes

Edited by NCcountrygal
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Oh Hi Magicmau, I didn't realize we'd already 'met' here when we had the ruffle discussion on another thread.

You mentioned Antique Pattern Library - my favorite place to 'get lost' for a few hours.  Not sure if you are already aware of this, but depending on how antique your pattern is - if it is prior to about 1920-ish, even if it is a US publication, it will use UK stitch terms.  There are a lot of US patterns there from the WW1 era (and earlier), so double check.  For some reason we silly Yanks changed our stitch naming system. 

I've seen some vintage patterns from a bit later (1930s-40s), that give different end measurements for the same doily pattern using size 10, 20, 30, 50 thread and specified different hook sizes. 

I don't think there is anything wrong with using a different thread and hook than the pattern calls for, if you are prepared for it to be bigger or smaller than the pattern says it should be (as long as you use a hook that 'goes with' the thread size and makes a reasonable looking fabric).  

 

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9 hours ago, Granny Square said:

Oh Hi Magicmau, I didn't realize we'd already 'met' here when we had the ruffle discussion on another thread.

You mentioned Antique Pattern Library - my favorite place to 'get lost' for a few hours.  Not sure if you are already aware of this, but depending on how antique your pattern is - if it is prior to about 1920-ish, even if it is a US publication, it will use UK stitch terms.  There are a lot of US patterns there from the WW1 era (and earlier), so double check.  For some reason we silly Yanks changed our stitch naming system. 

I've seen some vintage patterns from a bit later (1930s-40s), that give different end measurements for the same doily pattern using size 10, 20, 30, 50 thread and specified different hook sizes. 

I don't think there is anything wrong with using a different thread and hook than the pattern calls for, if you are prepared for it to be bigger or smaller than the pattern says it should be (as long as you use a hook that 'goes with' the thread size and makes a reasonable looking fabric).  

 

Yeah...actually I have changed my thread size and hook size to a smaller one if my pattern turned out to ruffle midway before I started with the blocking board...so I'm familiar with that. But with my last few times using patterns from Antique Pattern Library, I ran into some trouble if I change things...so I just wanted to be on the safer side this time since I spent so much money on thread. The biggest problem I ran into in one pattern from there is that you're supposed to make meshes of a few chains and a triple crochet, but it isn't specified how many stitches to skip. Sometimes you skip one and sometimes two; for a certain 1/8 section of the pattern, you're supposed to have a total of 15 meshes, that's all that's specified. My question was, how much is an 1/8 of the pattern, where do I start and stop counting the 15 meshes...yikes. So I haven't finished that project, more's the pity. If you want to know which pattern I'm referring to, I can look it up but I forget right now.

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11 hours ago, NCcountrygal said:

* #5 pearl/perle cotton is a little thicker than #10 crochet thread, but is suitable for most #10 cotton patterns.
* #8 pearl/perle cotton is about the same as #20 crochet thread.
* #12 pearl/perle cotton is about the same as #40 crochet thread

https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/understanding-crochet-thread-sizes-4053169
"With thread, the higher the number of the thread, the thinner it is. A size 3 in crochet thread sounds small and a size 30 sounds much larger, but a size 3 is going to be a thicker thread than a size 30. As the number of the thread goes up, the thickness goes down."

there are some standard crochet thread sizes.

Size 3 and 5 crochet thread is about as thick as a lightweight yarn, with size 3 being slightly thicker than size 5. If you have trouble learning thread crochet, start with these large sizes of thread.
Size 10 crochet thread is slightly thinner than most yarn, slightly thicker than size 3 or 5 threads. Beginners to thread crochet often find that this is a good size to start with.
Size 20 and 30 crochet thread are common options. Many of the thread crochet patterns that you will find are going to call for one of these two sizes of thread.
People interested in working with even thinner thread will find that it comes in increments of 10 (size 40 to size 100), with the lower numbers being slightly thicker (but still very thin) compared to the highest numbers.

https://crafttribeonline.com/embroidery-thread-101-a-guide-to-types-and-sizes/
Embroidery thread 101: A guide to types and sizes

Thank you for your help, I never knew there were so many different kinds of crochet thread before. And it would be wonderful to use embroidery floss sometimes but I didn't know the equivalents before this...so many thanks for that.

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11 hours ago, NCcountrygal said:

* #5 pearl/perle cotton is a little thicker than #10 crochet thread, but is suitable for most #10 cotton patterns.
* #8 pearl/perle cotton is about the same as #20 crochet thread.
* #12 pearl/perle cotton is about the same as #40 crochet thread

https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/understanding-crochet-thread-sizes-4053169
"With thread, the higher the number of the thread, the thinner it is. A size 3 in crochet thread sounds small and a size 30 sounds much larger, but a size 3 is going to be a thicker thread than a size 30. As the number of the thread goes up, the thickness goes down."

there are some standard crochet thread sizes.

Size 3 and 5 crochet thread is about as thick as a lightweight yarn, with size 3 being slightly thicker than size 5. If you have trouble learning thread crochet, start with these large sizes of thread.
Size 10 crochet thread is slightly thinner than most yarn, slightly thicker than size 3 or 5 threads. Beginners to thread crochet often find that this is a good size to start with.
Size 20 and 30 crochet thread are common options. Many of the thread crochet patterns that you will find are going to call for one of these two sizes of thread.
People interested in working with even thinner thread will find that it comes in increments of 10 (size 40 to size 100), with the lower numbers being slightly thicker (but still very thin) compared to the highest numbers.

https://crafttribeonline.com/embroidery-thread-101-a-guide-to-types-and-sizes/
Embroidery thread 101: A guide to types and sizes

Actually I have tatting thread I bought off ebay before, size 70, which is the thinnest I have. I tried to use an antique pattern from Antique Pattern Library for it but I ran into a problem. The thread is so thin that I had a real issue with using my hook to make nice looking triple crochets. The top part would be too wide. So I don't know what my problem is. I can't seem to use the size 70 thread and small hook (size .75 mm) together at the same time...I don't know what to do or how to resolve my problem. I can use size 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 thread just fine but once it is thinner than that, I can't. Any idea what I should do? I guess I should post a separate topic...

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11 hours ago, magicmau5 said:

Actually I have tatting thread I bought off ebay before, size 70, which is the thinnest I have. I tried to use an antique pattern from Antique Pattern Library for it but I ran into a problem. The thread is so thin that I had a real issue with using my hook to make nice looking triple crochets. The top part would be too wide. So I don't know what my problem is. I can't seem to use the size 70 thread and small hook (size .75 mm) together at the same time...I don't know what to do or how to resolve my problem. I can use size 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 thread just fine but once it is thinner than that, I can't. Any idea what I should do? I guess I should post a separate topic...

We have a very fine thread member on the forum. She’s the expert. She posts her work in the finished items section of Crochetville. 
I’ll post back. 
https://forum.crochetville.com/profile/71583-veronika-rohrhofer/

Edited by NCcountrygal
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"The biggest problem I ran into in one pattern from there is that you're supposed to make meshes of a few chains and a triple crochet, but it isn't specified how many stitches to skip. "  This sounds like filet, and Gross filet specifically (it's German, the last letter is really ß, which is not our B but double s (ss).  I like filet, but I will run away screaming from patterns that are written out but not charted.  

"Modern' filet it typically based on 3 US DC stitches, Gros filet is based on 4 US treble stitches, with finer thread as you pointed out.  #10 is about the finest I can handle, and have to take it easy at that (I have a laundry list of hand issues that just gets longer as I get older) :sigh 

This site has a great tutorial for more common / modern 3-stitch filet, but would probably be mind-bending trying to translate s written pattern for gross filet to modern.  I can't find any English tutorials on the gross filet, but I believe it's just 1 more chain in a block for open mesh, and 1 extra Tr for a filled mesh compared to the link I gave you.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/13/2021 at 9:16 AM, Granny Square said:

"The biggest problem I ran into in one pattern from there is that you're supposed to make meshes of a few chains and a triple crochet, but it isn't specified how many stitches to skip. "  This sounds like filet, and Gross filet specifically (it's German, the last letter is really ß, which is not our B but double s (ss).  I like filet, but I will run away screaming from patterns that are written out but not charted.  

"Modern' filet it typically based on 3 US DC stitches, Gros filet is based on 4 US treble stitches, with finer thread as you pointed out.  #10 is about the finest I can handle, and have to take it easy at that (I have a laundry list of hand issues that just gets longer as I get older) :sigh 

This site has a great tutorial for more common / modern 3-stitch filet, but would probably be mind-bending trying to translate s written pattern for gross filet to modern.  I can't find any English tutorials on the gross filet, but I believe it's just 1 more chain in a block for open mesh, and 1 extra Tr for a filled mesh compared to the link I gave you.

Oh really? I never considered that pattern to be a type of filet crochet but now that you mention it, it is similar.

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I ran into that when I was first learning to crochet (50+ years ago), I was given a bunch of old doily books, and reprints of even older doily patterns from Tower Press; there was a lovely filet pattern that was written out, and mentioned gross filet.  It was not charted otherwise I'd have followed the chart (there was a photo). The pattern was just "x tr, y ch, z tr, q chains..." and I knew I'd be certain to lose track.  So much easier to follow a chart/grid of open and closed meshes, if you put it down you can easily 'see' where you left off.

 

Edited by Granny Square
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