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Starting chain too loose


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Hi. I’m new here. I’m almost finished with my blanket but realize that the blocks are much looser on the starting chain. It’s very obvious when the blanket gets stretched. The first pic is the loose side. The second pic is how the other three sides look. Is there any way to tighten things up? Thanks.

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When I have a problem with my starting chain I either go up a hook size, or down...depends on my tension. Then I switch to the size I'm supposed to use for the body of the pattern. As far as your pictures here, the entire blanket looks as if the ruffled edge was purposely made like that! 

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Thank you, so much. I will remember that in my future projects. I’m wondering if there is a way to tighten up that loose side now that the blanket to finished. It stretchier than the other three sides.

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If it makes you feel any better, I've been crocheting for ages and my chains tend to be a little looser than my stitches too.  I wouldn't worry about it, your blanket is lovely!  Chaining with a smaller hook for a foundation chain is a great suggestion, but doesn't work if you are making something like a doily that is full of chain loops (would be a pain to switch hooks every few stitches).  

Random 'chain thing' -- If you find you've made a chain that's a little uneven - a looser chain thrown in every so often for example - rub the chain between your fingers (just a bit), it evens them out.

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Thank you. 
 The problem became obvious when I attached the border. That side (the loose side) won’t ruffle because of the looseness. I’m thinking of threading yarn through the foundation chain and try to create a little tension. Any thoughts?

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I've never done what you described, but it doesn't seem unreasonable; you can always try it for a few inches and re-do if you don't like the look. 

Or, maybe try this first -- on that side of the blanket, insert the hook...hard to describe...deeper down into (under) the underside of the foundation chain than you normally would, like 1 more loop's worth.  It might make it look a little less loose.  I had a blanket a few years ago where I did something similar--for that particular edging/blanket stitch pattern combo it looked better (to me) if I worked 1 loop deeper into the chain edge like that.

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I am really appreciating your help. This is a gift and, of course, I want it to be perfect. I am trying so hard to understand what you’re suggesting. So…the blanket is finished. How do I go back and insert the hook deep into the chain? 
Thank you, so much,  for trying to help me.

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I usually tighten up a situation like you have by running another length of yarn through the starting chain and tightening it with the yarn. 

If I'm making something where I'm not sure if I'll have this situation of a looser starting chain, I leave a very long tail so I can use it to do the tightening.

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I overlooked your thumb holding the edge, I misread your photo as to which was ruffle and which was blanket, my bad.  I was suggesting a rip and re-do to grab more than 1 loop of the chain, which is what you did on the fabric side of the chain not the edging side as I thought. 

One thing that might work, similar to your idea of threading yarn thru, is surface slip stitch 'embroidery'.  It is a slip stitch made on the surface of fabric, you hold the source yarn under the fabric, poke the hook down thru the fabric, grab a loop, poke the hook down again a 'stitch distance' away (so the loop travels over the surface of the fabric to form what looks like a chain stitch), poke and grab a loop, repeat - sort of like a sewing machine.  It is easy, looks nice (like a design element that was supposed to be there), and you'd have a little more control about tightening up more, or less, by where you poke the hook.  You'd want to do this all the way around the blanket so it looks like it was supposed to be there, not a 'patch', but it's easy.  Tutorial  

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