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roxanneea


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Hello crochet experts! I’m fairly new to crochet and struggling to understand this (it’s just a simple blanket pattern)

Row 1 was 1sc, 1dc and I’ve finished this. 

2nd row: Ch 3 (counts as dc). 1 sc in next dc 1 dc in next sc 

 

will it fall this way automatically because of the previous row? 

sorry if this makes no sense! 

 

thanks so much in advance :heart

Edited by roxanneea
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I believe you are discussing the seed stitch.  You alternate the stitches in each row sc in dc, dc in sc.  I have a doll blanket pattern that uses this pattern and I like it because it creates a nice texture and it is easy to follow when I'm not thinking.

I tend to mark the beginning and ending stitch and count at least every other row because I've been known to lose stitches with this pattern and as long as I count I keep on track.

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Thanks so much! And will I know if I’m going into an sc or a dc by looking at it in the first instance?

I guess if I mark the last stitch I did on the row as either sc or dc, I will know what it is when I turn and want to go into the sc or dc?

hope I’m making sense 

thanks again :) 

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Welcome to the 'ville, and I concur with all of the above.  J

Just adding that you are going to find that crochet stitch names are wildly inconsistent, I can think of at least 1 other crochet stitch called the 'seed' stitch - I learned it (edit, the stitch you are making) ages ago as the 'up down stitch', and Bgs found a link for the same stitch called lemon peel stitch (that's a new name to me but that's a good description!). 

Edited by Granny Square
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The picture is great.  I mentioned the seed stitch because I make a doll blanket like that every year and I did look up the stitch online and they list it as the seed stitch.

As for how to tell your dc should be larger than your sc.  However, when you finish a row you will be ending on a dc or sc  when you do your turning chain you might want to put either the dc or sc in the next row to remind you how this row is supposed to work.  My doll blankets are often my "waiting" projects.  So I put them in a bag and when I'm waiting for an appointment, etc. I'll work on them.  So it can be time between since I last saw the project.  Leaving something in place helps me to remember if I'm starting with a dc or sc.  I also mark the first and last stitch because my experience has been it is easy to lose a stitch as you go.  The marker will tell you where the last stitch should be placed.  It helps to keep counting every few rows to make sure your stitch count is correct.

 

Another project option to practice is a dishcloth.  It's a great way to learn a new stitch and you can actually put it to use when you are done.

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1 hour ago, Bailey4 said:

The picture is great.  I mentioned the seed stitch because I make a doll blanket like that every year and I did look up the stitch online and they list it as the seed stitch.

As for how to tell your dc should be larger than your sc.  However, when you finish a row you will be ending on a dc or sc  when you do your turning chain you might want to put either the dc or sc in the next row to remind you how this row is supposed to work.  My doll blankets are often my "waiting" projects.  So I put them in a bag and when I'm waiting for an appointment, etc. I'll work on them.  So it can be time between since I last saw the project.  Leaving something in place helps me to remember if I'm starting with a dc or sc.  I also mark the first and last stitch because my experience has been it is easy to lose a stitch as you go.  The marker will tell you where the last stitch should be placed.  It helps to keep counting every few rows to make sure your stitch count is correct.

 

Another project option to practice is a dishcloth.  It's a great way to learn a new stitch and you can actually put it to use when you are done.

Thanks :) so if I ended the row on a sc, then chained 2 - I could still start on a dc? I was under the impression chained was in place of a dc but perhaps not in this instance?

 

thanks all

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That's a good question. Normally for straight DC you'd chain 3 and turn and skip the first DC, as you are thinking/wondering.  So it would not be unreasonable to have the chain 2 count as the DC into the SC and skip the ending SC, and SC into the following DC, but I'd think the pattern would tell you?

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Roxanneea, I think we posted at the same time -  you have been using US terms, so that's how I and I think the rest of the folks who've posted here (who are all in the US, I believe) are interpreting your stitch terms.

The important thing is to keep the aggregate sum of SCs + DCs the same for each row, it may not always be the same 'subtotal' for each stitch type.

 

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Maybe this video will help describe getting those ends completed correctly. The advantage is the narrator describes the stitches in both U.S. and U.K. terms. She does use a different style of casting on than I would use. Interesting though.

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