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Having a little difficulty with a translated pattern


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Hi guys, this is my very first time creating an amigurumi with  a written pattern (I usually follow youtube videos) and I found myself stuck on this particularly tricky step. Is it an instruction that is lost in translation or is it a type of stitch I have yet to learn:

1. 5 ch, start to knit in the second loop from the hook, inc, 2sc, 3sc to the extreme ch, 3sc (10)” 

 

I would really really appreciate it if you guys could help me understand what this means and how to do it :DD 

TLDR; I DON’T UNDERSTAND THIS STEP PLS HELP!!

 

P.S. I can’t figure out how to attach pictures so I put a link to the pattern below:)))https://www.amigurumiday.com/march-cats-amigurumi-crochet-pattern/

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Welcome to the 'ville!  And, Oh dear, this line is ah...interesting.  First, I think the weirdest looking thing, the last word 'extreme' means 'end' (like the far extremity of the row).  Second: since you are new to written patterns, always read the whole pattern through before picking up your hook, especially the abbreviations or special stitches section.  

“1. 5 ch, start to knit in the second loop from the hook, inc, 2sc, 3sc to the extreme ch, 3sc (10)” 

I'm also going to paste the definition of inc from the pattern:  "..inc: make increase into same stitch as many as the number which is given in front of “inc” abbreviation (exp; 3inc, 4inc..)."  Note, the addition of the 'c' on the first 'inc' is mine.  (this pattern is not off to a good start...)  

The second loop from the hook = I assume second chain from the hook 

The (10) at the end of the line means at the end of the row you should have 10 stitches--it is sort of a 'sanity check', not an instruction to do something. 

So to rewrite this:

Chain 5, skip the first chain, 2 SC in the 2nd chain, 3 SC in the 3rd chain, 2 SC in the 4th chain, 3 SC in the 5th chain.  This equals 10 SC.

I've been crocheting for decades, and I give a lot of credit to people who can write patterns clearly in their not-native language, but I would not have the patience to plow through this ...puzzle really, rather than a pattern.  Many native English speaking designers make lovely creations but don't have the skill required to write a pattern clearly either unfortunately.

I strongly suggest you find another pattern.  This is not an ideal pattern for someone attempting their first written pattern, and I don't want you to run away screaming from written patterns altogether.  Patterns in magazines and yarn companies (yarnspiratins.com, lionbrand.com, etc. ) are conventionally written and tech edited.

https://www.craftyarncouncil.com/standards/how-to-read-crochet-pattern   this site is full of useful information, not just the page I linked to but other stuff as well (see menu on the right side).  This is a US site, so US stitch terms and yarn definitions etc.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Granny Square
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12 hours ago, Granny Square said:

Welcome to the 'ville!  And, Oh dear, this line is ah...interesting.  First, I think the weirdest looking thing, the last word 'extreme' means 'end' (like the far extremity of the row).  Second: since you are new to written patterns, always read the whole pattern through before picking up your hook, especially the abbreviations or special stitches section.  

“1. 5 ch, start to knit in the second loop from the hook, inc, 2sc, 3sc to the extreme ch, 3sc (10)” 

I'm also going to paste the definition of inc from the pattern:  "..inc: make increase into same stitch as many as the number which is given in front of “inc” abbreviation (exp; 3inc, 4inc..)."  Note, the addition of the 'c' on the first 'inc' is mine.  (this pattern is not off to a good start...)  However in general, it is always a good idea, before you pick up your hook, to read through the special stitches/stitch definition section to make sure you know what everything means; also the rest of the pattern really, to see how it's assembled or whatever might be ahead of you.

The second loop from the hook = I assume second chain from the hook 

The (10) at the end of the line means at the end of the row you should have 10 stitches--it is sort of a 'sanity check', not an instruction to do something. 

So to rewrite this:

Chain 5, skip the first chain, 2 SC in the 2nd chain, 3 SC in the 3rd chain, 2 SC in the 4th chain, 3 SC in the 5th chain.  This equals 10 SC.

I've been crocheting for decades, and I give a lot of credit to people who can write patterns clearly in their not-native language, but I would not have the patience to plow through this ...puzzle really, rather than a pattern.  Many native English speaking designers make lovely creations but don't have the skill required to write a pattern clearly either unfortunately.

I strongly suggest you find another pattern.  This is not an ideal pattern for someone attempting their first written pattern, and I don't want you to run away screaming from written patterns altogether.  Patterns in magazines and yarn companies (yarnspiratins.com, lionbrand.com, etc. ) are conventionally written and tech edited.

https://www.craftyarncouncil.com/standards/how-to-read-crochet-pattern   this site is full of useful information, not just the page I linked to but other stuff as well (see menu on the right side).  This is a US site, so US stitch terms and yarn definitions etc.

 

 

 

 

THANK YOU SO MUCH this was very helpful!! I’m so glad not ALL written patterns are this difficult. I’ll be sure to check out the website you linked! Thank you again!

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On 7/30/2021 at 5:38 AM, Granny Square said:

Welcome to the 'ville!  And, Oh dear, this line is ah...interesting.  First, I think the weirdest looking thing, the last word 'extreme' means 'end' (like the far extremity of the row).  Second: since you are new to written patterns, always read the whole pattern through before picking up your hook, especially the abbreviations or special stitches section.  

“1. 5 ch, start to knit in the second loop from the hook, inc, 2sc, 3sc to the extreme ch, 3sc (10)” 

I'm also going to paste the definition of inc from the pattern:  "..inc: make increase into same stitch as many as the number which is given in front of “inc” abbreviation (exp; 3inc, 4inc..)."  Note, the addition of the 'c' on the first 'inc' is mine.  (this pattern is not off to a good start...)  

The second loop from the hook = I assume second chain from the hook 

The (10) at the end of the line means at the end of the row you should have 10 stitches--it is sort of a 'sanity check', not an instruction to do something. 

So to rewrite this:

Chain 5, skip the first chain, 2 SC in the 2nd chain, 3 SC in the 3rd chain, 2 SC in the 4th chain, 3 SC in the 5th chain.  This equals 10 SC.

I've been crocheting for decades, and I give a lot of credit to people who can write patterns clearly in their not-native language, but I would not have the patience to plow through this ...puzzle really, rather than a pattern.  Many native English speaking designers make lovely creations but don't have the skill required to write a pattern clearly either unfortunately.

I strongly suggest you find another pattern.  This is not an ideal pattern for someone attempting their first written pattern, and I don't want you to run away screaming from written patterns altogether.  Patterns in magazines and yarn companies (yarnspiratins.com, lionbrand.com, etc. ) are conventionally written and tech edited.

https://www.craftyarncouncil.com/standards/how-to-read-crochet-pattern   this site is full of useful information, not just the page I linked to but other stuff as well (see menu on the right side).  This is a US site, so US stitch terms and yarn definitions etc.

Hi @Granny Square, I don't know if you'll be able to see this I just wanted to come back on here to say I was actually able to complete the cat :D Besides the one line you helped me clarify, the rest was pretty easy to follow, so I kept going and now I have a cute kitty to gift my niece. I've attached some pictures below for you to enjoy. Thank you stranger from the internet :)

On 7/30/2021 at 5:38 AM, Granny Square said:

 

 

Screen Shot 2021-08-11 at 19.21.56.png

Screen Shot 2021-08-11 at 19.22.04.png

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