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Need help toddler cut ends.


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I need help. My 4 year old thought he was helping mommy and cut all the ends off the blanket I was working on. Please tell me there is a way to fix this and the blanket isn't ruined? Editing to answer some responses. It's just a single crochet blanket with 2 colors, nothing fancy because I'm new and this is my first blanket. As far as how many ends, sadly all of them and cut all the way to the blanket.

Edited by Kdoll
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Welcome to the 'ville, and I'm sorry that happened.  Hopefully someone will come along and have a better idea, but the only thing I can think of--if you have a sewing machine, run a zig-zag stitch a couple of times around to catch the edges so they won't fray any further, and sew a wide binding 'tape' (pre-folded over fabric strips that is made for this) over the edges.  

If this is something like granny squares -- you could either unravel the last round and (1)make more squares and sew together smaller squares or (2) unravel the last round and replace it  (I'm not sure if one is more work than the other, but I'd pick 2). 

Edited to add, if you thought the seam binding was an odd idea, this is a pattern that used it to make straight edges out of the zig-zag stitch pattern and IMO didn't look bad

Edited by Granny Square
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I saw this last night and it just sent chills down my spine thinking about it- ---- wondering how many ends and just how short they were cut because that would play into my decision.  Most likely I would pull it apart and start it over.  

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2 hours ago, Granny Square said:

Welcome to the 'ville, and I'm sorry that happened.  Hopefully someone will come along and have a better idea, but the only thing I can think of--if you have a sewing machine, run a zig-zag stitch a couple of times around to catch the edges so they won't fray any further, and sew a wide binding 'tape' (pre-folded over fabric strips that is made for this) over the edges.  

If this is something like granny squares -- you could either unravel the last round and (1)make more squares and sew together smaller squares or (2) unravel the last round and replace it  (I'm not sure if one is more work than the other, but I'd pick 2). 

Edited to add, if you thought the seam binding was an odd idea, this is a pattern that used it to make straight edges out of the zig-zag stitch pattern and IMO didn't look bad

I'm sorry I'm so new I don't understand most of that 😂 I don't have a sewing machine and have no clue how to sew more than a button back on.

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53 minutes ago, bgs said:

How many ends are there and were they clipped really close?

 

He cut all the ends so something like 16 plus ends gone and he cut them all the way up to the blanket as close as he could without cutting the stitching.

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I was hoping he left you tiny bit more.  I have repaired afghans by overlapping ends and stitching them together with sewing thread in a matching color trying to hide join up in or under other stitches but I was able to finagle an overlap of a quarter to a half inch.  Some people use fabric glue to hold their ends in place but I dont see how it would be secure enough to hold the ends together.  At this point it seems to me like best thing to do is pull it apart so you can at least reuse the yarn.

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Bummer, but I agree with BGS that this is probably the most sensible thing to do.

Did you know there are a few ways you can splice yarn, to turn all the short pieces into a ball again?  My personal preference would be to do this first, rather than interrupting my crochet-stitching mojo as I go, but either way - I think it's easier than weaving ends, something mindless while watching TV maybe.

If it is wool, you can do a spit splice - just requires water, not icky spit!  Unravel the ends a couple of inches, overlap them, get them wet, and rub them together with your hands (like a kid makes a snake out of clay).  This makes the ends 'felt' together.  

With any fiber, a braided join (splay out 2 ends of yarn, overlap them, and braid both sides) or a Russian Join (fold 1 yarn end over the itself while capturing the other yarn, and braid back, repeat for the other side) work great - there are lots of Youtubes for these terms, I'm sure seeing a video will be clearer than try to follow my brief description.  The Russian or Spit are the quickest probably.  I've used all 3 for knit and crochet, and it's hard to find the stitch or 2 with the join even if you know where to look.

Edited by Granny Square
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15 minutes ago, Granny Square said:

Bummer, but I agree with BGS that this is probably the most sensible thing to do.

Did you know there are a few ways you can splice yarn, to turn all the short pieces into a ball again?  My personal preference would be to do this first, rather than interrupting my crochet-stitching mojo as I go, but either way - I think it's easier than weaving ends, something mindless while watching TV maybe.

If it is wool, you can do a spit splice - just requires water, not icky spit!  Unravel the ends a couple of inches, overlap them, get them wet, and rub them together with your hands (like a kid makes a snake out of clay).  This makes the ends 'felt' together.  

With any fiber, a braided join (splay out 2 ends of yarn, overlap them, and braid both sides) or a Russian Join (fold 1 yarn end over the itself while capturing the other yarn, and braid back, repeat for the other side) work great - there are lots of Youtubes for these terms, I'm sure seeing a video will be clearer than try to follow my brief description.  The Russian or Spit are the quickest probably.  I've used all 3 for knit and crochet, and it's hard to find the stitch or 2 with the join even if you know where to look.

Thanks everyone for the answers. It does sound like I'm going to have to start over and just salvage my yarn. As far as the tips, I only know single stitch, half double, and double right now. I have made a couple of square coasters that are really just larger gauge swatches. The blanket is my first attempt at anything else. That is how new I am to crochet lol.

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Granny Square I know a lady that swears by this join but I just cant bring myself to try/trust it.

Kdoll dont feel bad I have to pull things out all the time and start over.   I have accidentally clipped an end way too short and had to pull out a lot to get back to it.  I tell myself it was good practice on working on a stitch and my tension.

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Bgs, I'm with you re: not trusting that knot, I know from reading here and elsewhere that many swear by it as you said.  Actually, disregarding whether it is secure or not, it is not invisible, and I imagine could be uncomfortable if it is in certain areas of a garment (like the yoke of a sweater for example).  If nothing else, the splices I mentioned are overlaying several inches of yarn in different ways, so I think more area joined has to be more secure, or at worst as secure, as a knot where probably half an inch of yarn total is joined.

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I was so sorry to read about the ends getting cut. Children do like to help though, don't they? Here is just one more technique that has worked for me:

Russian Join

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