Jump to content
  • 0

Need help with a pattern


Question

Hi,

I’m new to crocheting and I’ve started to make a basket where the pattern was attached to the yarn that I bought. I’ve also followed a YouTube’er who is doing the tutorial of this basket. However, I’ve been doing exact what he is showing in the video but I do not get the same results ☹️. It’s so frustrating. 

I’ve attached pictures of how mine looks like. I’m on the second row but it just doesn’t look right. The first picture show the front and the second picture is showing the back. It looks like a mess. 
 

Also, getting 6 sc in the 2nd ch from hook is not easy. I can barely get my hook through the yarn the first time but 6 times make my yarn almost break. And I don’t think I’m crocheting too tight either. 
 

Please advise. 

https://youtu.be/VDhsOYIyBQ8 

E77A9D7A-C87A-4899-A493-F7797ED91F19.jpeg

4D94D25D-AE25-4F60-81D7-F86943E85251.jpeg

4DCB4BD6-8E3A-40CC-A4AE-CD4954612000.jpeg

Edited by Kittymodel
Link to post
Share on other sites


7 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

First check whether your yarn is the same weight as the pattern yarn and that you are using the right size hook. For a basket sometimes you use a smaller hook than the yarn calls for to give it more structure. Your yarn is more textured/fuzzy than the blanket yarn so it's going to look a little different.

You said 6 sc were hard to make, but the pattern calls for 8 sc. That difference would be enough to make it "cup" instead of being flat. Sometimes you have to make that chain that you are working into a little bigger than normal or you might try using a magic ring/circle instead of the ch 2. There are youtube videos showing how to do it.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Welcome to the 'ville! 

I wish I could take each new crocheter by the hand and tell them not to buy huge bulky (especially fuzzy) yarn until they have crocheted 1,000 stitches in worsted weight yarn and an appropriate sized hook. (that sounds like a lot, but it's really less than a typical pot holder's worth of stitches).

The type of yarn you have chosen is something I would not choose to work myself with after several decades of crocheting because I knot it's is a pain in the posterior to work with.  I would only recommend a beginner use it if they were my worst enemy - you seem like a nice person so I'm going to suggest you save that yarn for something several projects in the future. 

Fuzzy yarn is the most difficult to work with for anyone, and not appropriate for beginners - it makes it really difficult to see what you are doing. 

The second most difficult yarn for beginners is any bulky yarn, even if smooth, and tied for second place is variegated yarn of any weight.  A worsted weight yarn with an appropriate hook (US I size, 5.5 mm is ideal), with a solid light colored yarn, is more appropriate for a beginner to learn with, handle, and see what you are doing.  Too small or too large of a scale is hard to handle and learn with, and darker/variegated colors are hard to see your stitches to tell where to put your hook or whether you are making a mistake.

Are you using an "S" / 19 millimeter hook? That is about the thickness of my thumb (or roughly 3/4"diameter).  If you are using a too-small hook for any yarn, it is going to be difficult  (too tight) to crochet with.

 

Edited by Granny Square
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites


  • 0

Thank you so much guys for all your insights!
 

I feel like you actually took my hand and led me in the right direction, Granny Square 🙂
 

When I picked the yarn I saw that the pattern that came with it said it was an easy pattern and ok for beginners. However, after I’d struggled for almost a week, I started to think if I’d chosen the right yarn. I can’t see the stitches because of the fussiness so I’ve pretty much guessed my way through. 

The other reason why I chose this yarn, was because I wanted to crochet something that I would actually use instead of making something that would end up in the back of my drawer. 

When I learned to crochet from Craftys, the tutorials never spoke about what kind of yarn that was good for beginners. 
 

To answer your questions; I started with a 19” hook but after a few days I switched to 15” hook but I didn’t find this to be any easier. 
Like I said earlier, because the yarn is so fussy I can’t really see what I’ve done 😄

What kind of projects would you recommend for beginners? 



 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Scarves are good because they aren't such a big project as to feel overwhelming and you can start with simpler stitch patterns and progress to more elaborate ones. Washcloths/dishcloths (cotton yarn) are a great way to practice different stitches and you have something useful, whether or not it's "perfect".

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Aw shucks, glad to help Kittymodel.   

Just checking, you said 19" and then 15" hooks, which to me implies the length, which doesn't matter unless you are doing Tunisian style crochet (sort of a hybrid of knit and crochet, you stack up a lot of half-made stitches on the hook and then work them off). 

Did you mean millimeter (hook shaft diameter) instead of inches (length from hook to the other end)?  If you went from 19mm to 15mm diameter, in other words going to a smaller hook, it would have made it even tighter to work with -- a bigger hook might have helped if they make them any bigger than S size (19mm).  Just checked, I had to look at several hook size charts before finding anything bigger and found a T size which is 30 mm, more than an inch!....whoa.

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I’m sorry...yes I meant 19mm and 15mm hook 😄
19 and 15 inches would’ve been a little too long. Ha ha 😄
 

I thought by using a smaller hook would make it easier for me but not really. 


 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I thought so (mm versus length), but they do make long hooks for working Tunisian stitches so I was just checking.  

A bigger hook makes bigger and looser stitches, a smaller hook makes tighter and smaller stitches.  It's easier to make stitches with a overlarge hook for the yarn than a too-small hook.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...