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New and disheartened!


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I am new to crochet. I am following a (single crochet) pattern that doesn't say "ch1" at the end of each row. So, I haven't. 

A long way into the pattern, one part of the toy now says "ch1" at the end of each row. 

General question - if I'm following a (standard) pattern, do I presume I chain 1 (if it's sc) at the beginning of each row, even when it's not stated? 

Specific question - should I have been "ch1" at the end of every row in the whole pattern?! If yes, why does it suddenly say "ch1" now?! Does that mean I should now ch2?! 

I'm confused and getting disheartened...

This is the pattern, and it's the hood where "ch1" suddenly appears... https://artisticgaming.com/portfolio/final-fantasy-tonberry-pattern/

Thank you so much in advance! 

Edited by Rosiepose
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Welcome to the 'ville!  Last question first - no, don't assume you have to chain 2, that would make a hole.

Conventionally, when working SC in rows, or in the round NOT in a spiral, you chain 1, this is the turning chain that brings the yarn up to the level of the next row.  In rows you'd chain 1 and turn, in non-spiral rounds that are joined and 'chained up' (so not in a spiral, in discrete rounds where you join the end of the round to the beginning), you chain up after joining, and start a new round--either turning or same side facing.

When working in spiral rounds (which your pattern is doing for the head), you don't chain 1, because the round 'never ends' (sorta), it just overlaps and keeps going.  Later on, this pattern calls this 'method' a continuous round (same as what I'm calling spiral).

But the next part, the body, is worked in rows around the 'neck hole', it tells you 'for this part we we are not working in rounds'.  This is why the 'chain 1, turn' kicks in at this point. It appears you will be working a 'flat' piece, connected to the head, but there's an opening between the head and where the body ends; it looks like this gets sewn up later.

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14 hours ago, Granny Square said:

Welcome to the 'ville!  Last question first - no, don't assume you have to chain 2, that would make a hole.

Conventionally, when working SC in rows, or in the round NOT in a spiral, you chain 1, this is the turning chain that brings the yarn up to the level of the next row.  In rows you'd chain 1 and turn, in non-spiral rounds that are joined and 'chained up' (so not in a spiral, in discrete rounds where you join the end of the round to the beginning), you chain up after joining, and start a new round--either turning or same side facing.

When working in spiral rounds (which your pattern is doing for the head), you don't chain 1, because the round 'never ends' (sorta), it just overlaps and keeps going.  Later on, this pattern calls this 'method' a continuous round (same as what I'm calling spiral).

But the next part, the body, is worked in rows around the 'neck hole', it tells you 'for this part we we are not working in rounds'.  This is why the 'chain 1, turn' kicks in at this point. It appears you will be working a 'flat' piece, connected to the head, but there's an opening between the head and where the body ends; it looks like this gets sewn up later.

Thanks so much, granny square! 

OK, so spiral stuff (I think I understand your distinction!) no ch1 (as it's continuous). "In the round" (where the work would essentially grow downwards, in a tube - is that the right distinction?) you do ch1. Is that right? If so - interesting! I didn't know that! 

I think what's confused me is this: let's only consider the flat bits of the pattern. In the body, it DOES say ch1 at the end of every row. So I did! Then I did the robe (doesn't mention it, so I didn't) and sleeves (ditto). Should I have been doing ch1 at the end of every row for these? I didn't. If I should have, why does she say ch1 explicitly for the body, but not for the robe and sleeves? 

For the hood, ch1 isn't mentioned for the first 13 rows, so I didn't. Should I have? Then suddenly it's there for the rest of the rows! 

Arg! I'm a straight lines person who likes to know the rules and follow them! What would you do for this pattern? How am I supposed to know generally, if someone suddenly starts saying ch1 in the middle - that I should or shouldn't have been doing it standard ly? 

Thanks for your help; I really appreciate it! 

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"OK, so spiral stuff (I think I understand your distinction!) no ch1 (as it's continuous). "In the round" (where the work would essentially grow downwards, in a tube - is that the right distinction?) you do ch1. Is that right? If so - interesting! I didn't know that! "

The term working in the round means just that----you continue going around instead of back and forth in rows.  You either work in a continuous spiral or you join with a slip stitch and then chain.  A tube can be made using either method.   

I have looked over this pattern and it appears the author has been very explicit and gave detailed instructions which is what a good pattern should do. Evidently  the designer feels these changes are necessary to achieve the shape/look she wants.  Follow the instructions in this pattern exactly the way it is written.  Do not second guess or read anything into it.  Then if  you do not like the shaping pull it apart and make the changes you feel are necessary.

Edited by bgs
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^ What Bgs said.  (you guys must be a few time zones ahead of me or very early risers!)

Double underlining that last bit about 'do not second guess or read anything into it'. 

When I was a beginner crocheter in the dark ages before the internet, after 1 lesson on basic stitches from a friend's mom, I didn't want to bug her with questions, so I carefully followed patterns word.for.word.  Fortunately patterns were (mostly) more accurate/tech edited, and I learned a lot that way--often I thought "no way is that going to work!", then I did what it said, and "huh, look at that interesting way to get from point A to B!"  Or in the occasional case where the pattern was wrong, I could usually see "what it meant to say" by the wrong thing I ended up with.

 

 

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