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melwaw

Evergreen Forest Afgan

Question

Hello! My name is melissa and I'm new to crocheting. I purchased a pattern book but am having trouble understand the instructions. I was wondering if someone would be able to explain to me what this first paragraph for row one means?

"Working in back ridges of beginning chain, double crochet in fourth chain from hook and in next 13 chains, 3 double crochet in next chain, double crochet in next 15 chains ☆skip next 3 chains, double crochet in next 15 chains, 3 double crochet in next chain, double chain in next 15 chains, repeat☆

do I double crochet the whole way through?? I'm very confused 

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Posted (edited)

Hi Melissa, welcome to the 'ville!

"Working in back ridges of beginning chain, double crochet in fourth chain from hook and in next 13 chains, 3 double crochet in next chain, double crochet in next 15 chains ☆skip next 3 chains, double crochet in next 15 chains, 3 double crochet in next chain, double chain in next 15 chains, repeat☆

First of all, you said you are new so if this isn't new to you forgive me, but I'm just making sure I'm covering everything--skipping the first 3 chains, and DC into the 4th, creates a turning chain, which normally counts as a stitch, in addition to the first real stitch.

I underlined and highlighted the parts where you don't just DC 'the whole way through'.  Notice there are 2 spots where you put 3 stitches into one chain, and 1 spot where you skip 3 chains.  (Some new crocheters balk at putting more that 1 stitch into 1 stitch, trust me you can put a LOT of stitches into one stitch or chain)

The word chain that I highlighted in red probably a typo and should be crochet (double crochet, not double chain).  You can't put a chain into a stitch, however you can chain "into the air" above a stitch, and then (usually) skip some stitches to make a hole on purpose (like lace, or a buttonhole).

I learned the best path if you are not sure about what a crochet pattern is telling you is to follow it literally.  You won't break anything, the worst thing is ripping out a row.  Sometimes there are typos like the 'chain' above, but other times you learn a cool new thing.

Also - ☆ - is this a Leisure Arts (publisher) book?  I know they use that symbol (oh wait, I just grabbed a book, they use a solid star, hmm).  Anyway my point is, most well written patterns or pattern books will have a section at the front or back of the pattern or book that lists the symbols and what they mean.  Since I mentioned Leisure Arts and have a book open, the solid ☆ for example means to work instructions following ☆ as many more times as indicated in addition to the first time.  

Here is a site with a lot of useful information since you are new https://www.craftyarncouncil.com/standards  , take a look at the menu on the right side, and look at 'Crochet patterns - how to read', for the punctuation and symbols you'll find in patterns - this is the 'industry guide' for US pattern terms, yarn definitions, etc.

 

Edited by Granny Square
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