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Horsy

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Can someone tell me the difference between tonal, gradient, variegated and self-striping in yarn colours?  Sometimes, it seems to me, anyway, some of these terms are used interchangeably and I am not sure that is accurate.  Thanx. 

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Hi again Horsy:  Sometimes artists will take free license as what to call some yarns. I personally go by what the manufacturer states. Here's a quick breakdown;

Tonal- Lighter and darker tones in the same color,

Gradient- Changes from 1 color to a deeper shade of a similar color,

Variegated- Dyed with more than 1 color and makes each color change (usually) gradually to another color, which can include Fleshing, Pooling and Self-Striping.

Self-Striping- Literally creates stripes while crocheting or kitting.

Maybe another member will have a bit more to add.

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Posted (edited)

My understanding is...(delete, delete), Reni said the same thing I was in the middle of typing.  To add a note on self striping, I usually see this in regard to sock yarn, which is designed to work in the round in a tube in a small range of stitch count and tension.    I wish I could remember the brand to link to it (I think it was a European brand, German perhaps), that had sock yarn that actually formed distinct flowers within the stripes.

Edit, this wasn't the  flower stripe yarn I remember, it's much more abstract but to give you an idea.

Edited by Granny Square

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Thanks, kids.  What would you call, then, the colour arrangement whereby you get no more than,say, 4 or 5 completely different colours (not tonal variations), with no colour being repeated.  Like this, e.g., 

https://www.yarncanada.ca/products/green-tea-tipple-whirl-yarn-1-super-fine-by-scheepjes.html

Starts out dark turquoise (?), ends up gray. It is true that the colour change is gradual, but it is not the same tone, is it.  I just want to get my terms correct and am not meaning to trouble you.   Now, I would say that the following is a genuine "tonal" or "gradient".  

https://www.yarncanada.ca/products/forbidden-fuchsia-whirl-ombre-yarn-1-super-fine-by-scheepjes.html

And then there's the term "OMBRE" (see Scheepjes, above).   As far as I can tell it could refer to any multi-colour or multi-tone where the hues are not repeated.  And then there's "WHIRL" as used by Scheepjes, tho I guess that's a marketing term, not a technical one. 

My conclusion:  the above terms are used interchangeably (and incorrectly) by everybody.  You can bet that a yarn designer would set us right in no time flat! 

All grist for the mill and I beg your indulgence.  I could listen to your opinions and info for ages.  You all know  more than me.  I have never bought a tonal, gradient, self striping or ombre yarn. Makes things too easy if you ask me, though that is not a crime and it won't bring out the Crochet Police. 😁

 

 

 

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I'm no crochet vocabulary expert, but I'd describe that yarn as a long (color) run variegated yarn.  As opposed to short color run variegated like variegated Red Heart Super Saver for example.  The long color runs like that tend to avoid the ugly pooling that you get with short color runs.  The short runs can be interesting in so-called 'Faux-Isle' (fake Fair Isle patterns), like this one, and there are some planned-pooling patterns for them.

This naming thing goes along with crochet stitches, where one stitch can have many different names, or 1 stitch name can refer to many completely different stitches...very confusing.

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Posted (edited)

The above was describing the blue and grey, I somehow missed your second link - IMO tonal and ombre ar the same thing, or at least closely related.  I've been crocheting for decades and 'ombre' was/is a description common on yarn labels, 'tonal' is something I've only heard recently and haven't noticed on a yarn label, but then I use about 99.99% solid yarn and thread so may have just not noticed....

Edited by Granny Square

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I've seen yarn classified as Ombre with different colors instead of monochromatic in color. Go figure.

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On 6/14/2020 at 12:40 PM, Granny Square said:

I'm no crochet vocabulary expert, but I'd describe that yarn as a long (color) run variegated yarn.  As opposed to short color run variegated like variegated Red Heart Super Saver for example.  The long color runs like that tend to avoid the ugly pooling that you get with short color runs.  The short runs can be interesting in so-called 'Faux-Isle' (fake Fair Isle patterns), like this one, and there are some planned-pooling patterns for them.

This naming thing goes along with crochet stitches, where one stitch can have many different names, or 1 stitch name can refer to many completely different stitches...very confusing.

Isn't striped socks made from  "planned pooling" yarn?  Mind you, I've never heard of it referred to by such a name. 

The Faux-Isle sweater turned out pretty good in that knitted sweater, I would say. 

About stitches with different names, did you mean pattern stitches (sequence of individual stitches repeated to create a fabric) or actual basic stitches such as SC, DC, TC, TSC, chain, etc?  If you mean pattern stitch, I see a few different names for one of my fave, the Up and Down Stitch.  

https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/up-and-down-stitch

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Posted (edited)

Striped socks are made from self-striping sock yarn; they rely on you to make a thing of sock-like proportions in the round for the striping to show up, in other words other things, possibly color cacophony, happens if you make a big wide blanket with it.

I haven't heard of 'planned pooling yarn'.  I know Red Heart has self-pooling patterns like the one I linked above that (presumably) only work with their variegated yarns, you have to adhere to a strict stitch tension for the patterns to work.  But they don't call the yarn itself 'planned pooling yarn', it's just variegated.

By stitches with different names, I meant like the Up Down stitch, which is the name I learned it by, but it is also called grit stitch, and probably other things.

The basic SC, DC thing...is not what I meant, they are standard...depending on where you or the pattern writer live.  Here

Edited by Granny Square
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