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Atsen

Atsen

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I am just starting a pattern for a cushion {beginner}.  It says Chain 72..ok....beginning in 2nd ch from hook 70dc, 3dc in end st, turining as you go, work into other side of chain,69dc, 2 dc in end st, sl st to join. (144 sts). How could you double the sts and end up with 144 ? I understand the stitches etc. just missing this increase??

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You are making an oval.

A bit of advice - if you normally work into a chain by using the back bump, this method does not work as well for an oval - I suggest starting by working into the top loop to start with  (top loop with the chain side facing you, and the back bump away from you).  This will avoid the tension issues of the back loop and make the second pass much easier.

Recipe for an oval: work 1 stitch across the chain, except in the last chain make several stitches (depending on the stitch you are using) to 'turn the corner' so the underside of the chain is now facing up, and then continue using the loops you didn't use on the first pass, then add a bunch of stitches back at the beginning end to turn the other corner, and you are back to the first stitch.

If this is still confusing, there are youtubes for generic ovals that show you the concept, it IS a little mind bending the first time you do it.

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I agree with Granny Square I learned to make the oval before the magic circle so it seems more natural to me but it is easy to understand why it confuses people.  The oval is formed on both sides of the chain which is unusual for crochet.  Instead of working in the round with a circle or back and forth you work both sides of the chain to form an oval sort of shape to make your pattern.

I did check the math just to make sense because every so often some of the patterns are off.  The math works.  If you chain 72 and work 70 dc that leaves you with one stitch at the end.  Into that stitch you will make 3 dc into one stitch that increases your stitch count and turns you on to the other side or what some call the back side of the chain.  You will then work down the back side of the chain completing 69 chains.  In the last chain you will add 2 dc completing your first round of the oval.

You will likely want to mark your rows with some kind of stitch marker.

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Good point on the stitch markers, I do that to mark the first stitch, and pertinent spots of the increases on each end to keep my bearings on where the increases are supposed to start

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Many thanks both for your help.. yes it does sound odd?? I can see what you mean working along the back of the chain but my cushion measures 40 x 40cm [square] so I cant see how that will work?? I may just do 2 sides at 70/72 chain 40 x 40, may be more straightforward... do you think?

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Hmm...the only thing that occurs to me is that you may be making a rectangle 80x40cm (which you could do in the 'oval' way, just making squared off corners at each end instead of half-rounds), then folding and sewing into a square.  Is there a link where we can see what the end result is supposed to look like, or can you give the name of the pattern and the source and we might be able to find it?

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Hi Granny Square... thanks for your comments. I am a very experienced knitter and can read most patterns, I would have thought the crochet patterns {once understanding the stitches} would be pretty straightforward? I have also been onto Youtube to gleam some information and I am convinced now that this pattern or measurements of cushion are a little incorrect!

The pattern is the Dandelion cushion on Deramores UK online, if you want to take a look. As you say a rectangle of 40/80cm makes sense to me or 2 40cms, thats probably the way I ll go!! Many thanks again for your time.

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Posted (edited)

https://us.deramores.com/products/dandelion-cushion-by-zoe-potrac-in-deramores-studio-dk?variant=23738435862586

I knit too, tho lots more experience in crochet. In the US there is an organization for knit and crochet (Craft guild of America) that gives 'pattern grammar' standards for both crafts, and yarn patterns from yarn companies, books and magazines usually follow them pretty well.  Where one more typically encounter poorly written patterns is in a small % of personal blogs or self published patterns--some are truly ghastly.

That is a pretty pattern!  And now that I see it, I'm amending my theory - but just a little.  Actually for a pillow, this construction makes a LOT of sense; I was going with rectangle because of the measurements you gave.  Meanwhile, a little crochet 'stitch behavior' lesson:

Knit stitches have a lovely tendency to stack up tidily on top of each other, whether worked in the round or in turned rows.  

Crochet stitches, alas, do not - the 'stitch tops' don't sit directly on top of the stitches, but rather to the right (probably to the left if one is left handed, not sure).  To illustrate:

Turned Rows:  The skew more or less cancels out the skew so the stitches seem more aligned.

///////

\\\\\\\

///////

\\\\\\\

In the round, same side facing:  the skew compounds itself--the red stitches as they appear in 1 column (red stitch made into the red stitch below)

///////

///////

///////

///////

Now look at your pattern's photo--the stitches of the body of the pillow are drifting to the right - this, and the appearance of the stitches, tells me that the pillow is actually made IN THE ROUND.  The shape is like a sack, 1 continuous piece that you will sew up at the top after adding the flowers and stuffing.

So you are making an oval at the bottom, and then working round and around until you reach 40 cm.  If you lay it flat, and your stitch tension is right, yes it will measure 40x40cm (on 1 side).

edit-totally up to you, but if I were making this, I would not join the rounds--reason: joining rounds is going to make an obvious 'seam', which is going to slant like the stitches do if you don't also turn your work.  There are valid reasons to join rounds for other purposes or stitch patterns, but in the case of THIS pattern, working round and round in a spiral (like most knitted tubes) and eliminate the 'seam', will look much better/uniform.  

 

Edited by Granny Square

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Thank you Granny Square for your additional help. It makes more sense now that you have explained the 'sack' description. I have tested same on a small amount and it seems to work. Thank you very much for your help. Have a good day.

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Some time ago I tried to make an oval, following the instructions in the pattern - but it just didn't work.  I tried and tried but could not get the hang of it.   Thanks for all your info.  I am going to have to reread this all carefully when I have time.  

Where one more typically encounter poorly written patterns is in a small % of personal blogs or self published patterns--some are truly ghastly.

I can't recall if I mentioned this before or not, but I actually paid good money for a pattern for crocheted mitts (mittens, as some call them).  I used the same gauge yarn, the right hook, followed the instrs - and halfway of the way thru the first mitt, just before the thumb, the damn thing was so huge it would have fallen off a giant's hand.  So, I rescued this project by now using it as a cover for the jar where I keep my hooks.  Looks not too bad. 

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Published books, mags, and yarn company website patterns are usually tech edited, and do have errors but they will usually publish errata (eventually).  I have seen such ... garbage shared here by poor souls trying to figure out self published patterns written by inept pattern writers.  Maybe not inept designers but making something fantastic looking and writing the instructions down accurately and clearly in standard terms so other people can understand them are completely different skills.  Heck, I make notes of alterations I make on patterns sometimes and then later wonder what on earth I was trying to tell myself.  :lol 

 

 

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