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Heike

Basic crochet pattern help

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Hi all - I just started my first crochet project and i am already failing. I must have started all over at least 20 times by  now :( 

The initial instructions are as follows:

Make an adjustable slip know and 2ch.

Row 1: 6dc in the second ch from the hook (does this mean that I have to make 6 double crochet in the same stitch, i.e. the second one or the first one I made or do I make on in the second stitch and then 5 more in each of the newly created ones as I go along?)

Row 3: 1dc, 2dc in the next st 6 times (18 stitches) (just confirming here that this requires me to make one double crochet in the first stitch, then two double crochet in the second stitch [twice in the same], and then I repeat this five more times 

These are probably really stupid question but looking at what I've done so far, I'm clearly doing something wrong. 

Many thanks in advance!

Heike 

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Posted (edited)

There are 2 basic ways to start a circle.  You start by chaining two.  The slip knot is just the starting point at which you make your chain.  You chain two and then you place the required number of stitches in the second chain from the hook in this case 6 sc.  You can google starting chain and see how to do this.

I have to ask if you are missing a row somewhere because generally the stitch count goes from 6 to 12 to 18.  6 to 18 is an odd jump.  Generally row 2 would have you put 2 stitches in each of the 6 stitches bringing you to 12 stitches.  Going from 12 to 18 you would put 1 dc in the first stitch and 2 in the next continuing this pattern until you return to the first stitch.  I suggest you mark this stitch.

OK editing this looking back you don't list row 2 so I'm guessing that is where part of your confusion is coming from here.

 

As for your starting point I'd also research the magic circle.  It leaves a smaller starting hole.

Edited by Bailey4

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2 hours ago, Bailey4 said:

There are 2 basic ways to start a circle.  You start by chaining two.  The slip knot is just the starting point at which you make your chain.  You chain two and then you place the required number of stitches in the second chain from the hook in this case 6 sc.  You can google starting chain and see how to do this.

I have to ask if you are missing a row somewhere because generally the stitch count goes from 6 to 12 to 18.  6 to 18 is an odd jump.  Generally row 2 would have you put 2 stitches in each of the 6 stitches bringing you to 12 stitches.  Going from 12 to 18 you would put 1 dc in the first stitch and 2 in the next continuing this pattern until you return to the first stitch.  I suggest you mark this stitch.

OK editing this looking back you don't list row 2 so I'm guessing that is where part of your confusion is coming from here.

 

As for your starting point I'd also research the magic circle.  It leaves a smaller starting hole.

Thanks so much for the quick reply and the tips. This all makes sense but for some reason it still does not work for me. I must have done the first row 30 times but it just looks wrong (see pic) :(

 

And yes, sorry I didn't add the second row. It's 2dc in each st around (12sts) I just assumed that means that I do 2 double crochets in each of the 6 new stitches. Though that's easier said than done given that I have trouble seeing where the stitches exactly are.

 

row 1.jpg

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2 things:   I strongly suggest you practice this in a different yarn because that yarn is so fuzzy that it badly obscures the stitches (as you said).  it will be much easier with a smooth yarn. 

and what is the name and location of the pattern?  

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I may practice on some other yarn before I get back to this one. But thanks a lot - at least I understand the basics now.

I bought the pattern and yarn as a complete set at Spotlight. It' supposed to be a frog (but mine probably will be a ball with eyes :)) 

Frog patter 2.jpg

Frog pattern1.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Just to clarify this pattern is written in UK terminology therefore sc which most amigurumi  toys are made in is referred to as dc in UK terminology. I could be wrong but looking at your picture it looks as if you are using dc not sc.

 

Quick question you do understand the difference between working in a circle and rows right? I agree I'd practice with different yarn to make seeing the stitches easier but do you know where your next stitch is supposed to go? Technically you shouldn't join with a slip stitch when making a circle but after you make your 6 sc just for fun try joining with a slip stitch to first as to see what the closed circle is supposed to look like. You can always take it out and proceed without it but it will give you the idea of what circle crochet looks like. It is not the same as crocheting in rows.

I'd also encourage you to Google the magic circle it closes up easier than the chain 2.

Edited by Bailey4
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I agree to practice with a smooth yarn, your yarn is the second-to-last sort that I'd suggest for a beginner.  The last would be the same yarn, in black.

Also agree that the adjustable ring method that Baily4 suggested to use to start a circle is the "bee's knees".  When I first encountered a tutorial for this on the internet, I thought it was confusing until I realized it was really just making a loose slip knot--not closing it tight around the hook, leave as 1" or so open circle , stick the 'naked' hook in the circle, and make stitches around the circle, pulling it closed when you are done.  This is nice because you can pull it closed, or leave it open to a point if you'd rather.

On the other hand, you can cram an amazing amount of stitches into 1 chain or stitch, I think I've put up to 20 sts into 1 chain, so if the adjustable ring seems intimidating there's nothing wrong with working into a chain, since the yarn is already difficult by itself.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Bailey4 said:

Just to clarify this pattern is written in UK terminology therefore sc which most amigurumi  toys are made in is referred to as dc in UK terminology. I could be wrong but looking at your picture it looks as if you are using dc not sc.

 

Quick question you do understand the difference between working in a circle and rows right? I agree I'd practice with different yarn to make seeing the stitches easier but do you know where your next stitch is supposed to go? Technically you shouldn't join with a slip stitch when making a circle but after you make your 6 sc just for fun try joining with a slip stitch to first as to see what the closed circle is supposed to look like. You can always take it out and proceed without it but it will give you the idea of what circle crochet looks like. It is not the same as crocheting in rows.

I'd also encourage you to Google the magic circle it closes up easier than the chain 2.

I had no idea there is a difference between UK and US terminology... This is crushing! I didn't have any other yarn to practice on, so I kept on going yesterday using dc UK style (see attached).

Tbh, not too sure about the difference between working in circles and rows. I just kept on going around. I think I'll give up on the frog and focus on something easier (can you recommend any very basic and small toy patterns?). Def will have a look at the magic circle.

20200401_095623.jpg

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6 hours ago, Granny Square said:

I agree to practice with a smooth yarn, your yarn is the second-to-last sort that I'd suggest for a beginner.  The last would be the same yarn, in black.

Also agree that the adjustable ring method that Baily4 suggested to use to start a circle is the "bee's knees".  When I first encountered a tutorial for this on the internet, I thought it was confusing until I realized it was really just making a loose slip knot--not closing it tight around the hook, leave as 1" or so open circle , stick the 'naked' hook in the circle, and make stitches around the circle, pulling it closed when you are done.  This is nice because you can pull it closed, or leave it open to a point if you'd rather.

On the other hand, you can cram an amazing amount of stitches into 1 chain or stitch, I think I've put up to 20 sts into 1 chain, so if the adjustable ring seems intimidating there's nothing wrong with working into a chain, since the yarn is already difficult by itself.

 

 

Thanks a lot for your response. I'll have a look for a tutorial on this. And agreed, working with this yarn seems pretty challenging! I'll give up on the frog for now and will do some more practicing and then start on some very simple small patterns. 

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Don't be discouraged.  The UK and US terminology thing can confuse anyone.  I know about it and still end up writing the US terms over the UK terms because while I start out remembering oh yes that should be a .... I revert back to reading the pattern as if the terms were US.

II suggest visiting Planet June's tutorials here.  I've been making ami's for a long time and I still go back because she always has something to show me that I haven't been doing or that I want a different outcome.

From there I would check Ravelry for free ami patterns and find a small free one to try out once you have some yarn to practice on that is a bit lighter than the yarn you have for this project.

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Yeah, blame the US/UK term difference on we silly Yanks.  In the mid 1800s terms were really different than now, then sometime in the late 1800s they standardized on UK terms (even US patterns), then somewhere between the end of WW1 and 1930-ish the US went off and 'demoted' all the stitches.

By the way, my remark 'the same yarn in black (would be worse)' was meant partly as a joke and a warning; it's harder to see your stitches in black or very dark colored yarns, or variegated yarns--your shade of green would be great, just in a smoother yarn.  If you are in the US, Red Heart Super Saver is easy to find and is a good yarn to learn with.

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Forgot to look for easy practice toys--these were rated either 'piece of cake' or easy.  If you can't find eyes, embroidery with a little black yarn or thread would just take a couple of stitches.

Bunnies in time for Baster https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/lil-fun-buns

itty bitty octopi - different (easy) skill of curlicues to learn https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/mini-amigurumi-octopus

awww...kitty https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/cube-kitty-cat  or if you are a dog lover, https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/cube-puppy-dog Oh! more Easter bunnies https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/cube-bunny-rabbit -- all of these are from the same designer

Bear and bunny https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/tiny-amigurumi-bear-and-bunny  the only thing that might be -- not hard, but maybe a little mind-bending to visualize, is where the legs meet the body, but we can talk you thru if you get stuck.

This teddy bear made me laugh https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/square-bear-3

 

 

 

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Here is one recently posted here - it came to mind when looking for patterns earlier but forgotten where I'd seen it...

 

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On 4/1/2020 at 11:18 AM, Bailey4 said:

Don't be discouraged.  The UK and US terminology thing can confuse anyone.  I know about it and still end up writing the US terms over the UK terms because while I start out remembering oh yes that should be a .... I revert back to reading the pattern as if the terms were US.

II suggest visiting Planet June's tutorials here.  I've been making ami's for a long time and I still go back because she always has something to show me that I haven't been doing or that I want a different outcome.

From there I would check Ravelry for free ami patterns and find a small free one to try out once you have some yarn to practice on that is a bit lighter than the yarn you have for this project.

Thanks a lot! I just bookmarked the Planet June page. I know what I'll be doing on the weekend while still being locked up in the house :)

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On 4/2/2020 at 5:14 AM, Granny Square said:

Forgot to look for easy practice toys--these were rated either 'piece of cake' or easy.  If you can't find eyes, embroidery with a little black yarn or thread would just take a couple of stitches.

Bunnies in time for Baster https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/lil-fun-buns

itty bitty octopi - different (easy) skill of curlicues to learn https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/mini-amigurumi-octopus

awww...kitty https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/cube-kitty-cat  or if you are a dog lover, https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/cube-puppy-dog Oh! more Easter bunnies https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/cube-bunny-rabbit -- all of these are from the same designer

Bear and bunny https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/tiny-amigurumi-bear-and-bunny  the only thing that might be -- not hard, but maybe a little mind-bending to visualize, is where the legs meet the body, but we can talk you thru if you get stuck.

This teddy bear made me laugh 

 

 

 

I'm in Australia but I just had a look for Red Heart Super Saver and there are plenty of seller online selling it here. 

And thanks so much for the ideas! I love the octopus and the little dog! Will go for those first. The bear and the bunny are adorable too but they seem to be a bit more complex - might leave those for later. Thanks again for all the help!!

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23 hours ago, Granny Square said:

Here is one recently posted here - it came to mind when looking for patterns earlier but forgotten where I'd seen it...

 

Definitely will be trying this one too!! Thanks :)

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Glad some of the patterns looked promising!  Have fun :hook 

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