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EmmaB

More chains required?

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Hey lovely crochet people,

I think this is a very basic and simple question. It’s probably been asked and a answered a fair few times so apologies for asking again. 
 

I’m making a snood. Pattern states to use a 5mm hook. The wool I have for it states a 4mm hook. In order to get the right size would I need to add more chains? Pattern is 164. If I do need to add more can you just add as many as you want or does it need to go up a certain number? 
 

Hope that makes sense! 
 

Thanks so much all 

Em xx

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Hi Em, more info on the specific pattern and yarn would help with answers.  

If it's not a very fitted item, I'd probably just start with the 5mm and see how it looks.  

If it's more fitted, Hopefully the pattern gives a gauge so you can swatch.

 

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Thank you for the super fast response! I’m doing a snood. I’ve attached details. I’ll also attach a pic of the yarn. It’s Batik Swirl from Stylecraft and is a double knit 😊

image.jpg

0CBA0805-DBD2-4113-A0F6-58953CBE9E25.jpeg

4DDFB8E5-0724-4107-8F31-CD8A2C31C07F.jpeg

C8BD3E52-EC19-40C9-B2B6-DEEF2A134C13.jpeg

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I agree with magiccrochetfan. It appears what we call "gauge" they are calling "tension" . Work up a swatch (I like to do a 6"x6" square and then measure a 4"x4" section in the middle). If you're close on the count you should be okay since this is a Snood/scarf and not a fitted project. If your tension/gauge way off then you'll want to change your hook size. Adding chains wont help with getting you look but can make it longer if you ad equal amounts on both sides of the hood part.

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That’s fabulous, thank you so much. So for a swatch to check my gauge for this pattern what would I need to do - as in how many chains and how many rows? Just enough to make it 6” x 6”? I think I get it but what slightly confuses me is working out how many chains I would need to do and if I need to do a specific number to make this work - as in would I need to do an even number? 
 

Sorry for the really basic questions

 

Em x

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Posted (edited)

The pattern states the dimensions, width is 35.5". 

For the swatch, chain 6".  This will result in a square slightly less than 6", but the point was just to be more than 4" to avoid the edge stitches, so should be OK.  Work back in pattern, you will have a few chains hanging off the end probably but don't worry about it.

Based on your swatch, figure out how wide 1 stitch is - don't measure 1 stitch, measure across the 4"--example, if your gauge is spot on, 18 sts=4", so 4 divided by 18 is .22222".  35.5" divided by .22 is 161.36 stitches.  I would chain, say, 170 (notice the pattern says 164, which I looked at after I picked 170 out of the air - I picked a number that I knew would be slightly too many.  Reason:  your may not hit gauge exactly, and you need to think the same way -- you can pick out extra chains after working back (the piece will not unravel) and it's better than being to conservative and having to start over.  Don't worry about the stitch count matching the pattern repeat, just figure a rough number and add a few extra, and work back to the nearest pattern repeat, and pick out the extra chains later & weave in the end.   edit- meant to add, I used the pattern gauge, but you will need to do some math on YOUR gauge to figure out a ballpark number to chain, plus a few extra.

Fun fact:  I've seen really vintage patterns (circa 1900) not say 'chain x', but rather 'make a chain x inches long, turn, xyz instructions for working back, cut off the excess chain'.  Eek!  But older patterns didn't spell everything out like like modern patterns, it was assumed the crocheter knew what they were doing to get the result they were after, and didn't need to be told how to finish it off properly. 

 

 

Edited by Granny Square
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EmmaB, This is the correct way to get your gauge for crochet from expert Edie Eckman. Please save your self a lot of work and headaches. Your pattern will give you the Gauge need for your pattern ( 18 stitches across and 10 rows high should be in a 4"x4" square. Some people use 6"x6" Some do 5x5. Then you measure the center 4" and count how many stitches you have. Then count up 4" the see how rows you have. No math needed. The designers has already done that for you. 

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=how+to+get+correct+gauge+in+crochet&&view=detail&mid=A15106850E691996E55BA15106850E691996E55B&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=%2Fvideos%2Fsearch%3Fq%3Dhow%2Bto%2Bget%2Bcorrect%2Bgauge%2Bin%2Bcrochet%26FORM%3DHDRSC3

Granny Squares knowledge is still in the "Vintage Era".      Fun Fact: Vintage Patterns don't have "Gauge" Which is why  The Craft Yarn Council years ago released a Standard Chart on yarns, needles and hooks that all Designers use now in the US and the UK. 

I'll send a link to that also. 

https://www.craftyarncouncil.com/standards

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On 3/22/2020 at 2:02 PM, Granny Square said:

The pattern states the dimensions, width is 35.5". 

For the swatch, chain 6".  This will result in a square slightly less than 6", but the point was just to be more than 4" to avoid the edge stitches, so should be OK.  Work back in pattern, you will have a few chains hanging off the end probably but don't worry about it.

Based on your swatch, figure out how wide 1 stitch is - don't measure 1 stitch, measure across the 4"--example, if your gauge is spot on, 18 sts=4", so 4 divided by 18 is .22222".  35.5" divided by .22 is 161.36 stitches.  I would chain, say, 170 (notice the pattern says 164, which I looked at after I picked 170 out of the air - I picked a number that I knew would be slightly too many.  Reason:  your may not hit gauge exactly, and you need to think the same way -- you can pick out extra chains after working back (the piece will not unravel) and it's better than being to conservative and having to start over.  Don't worry about the stitch count matching the pattern repeat, just figure a rough number and add a few extra, and work back to the nearest pattern repeat, and pick out the extra chains later & weave in the end.   edit- meant to add, I used the pattern gauge, but you will need to do some math on YOUR gauge to figure out a ballpark number to chain, plus a few extra.

Fun fact:  I've seen really vintage patterns (circa 1900) not say 'chain x', but rather 'make a chain x inches long, turn, xyz instructions for working back, cut off the excess chain'.  Eek!  But older patterns didn't spell everything out like like modern patterns, it was assumed the crocheter knew what they were doing to get the result they were after, and didn't need to be told how to finish it off properly. 

 

 

Thank you so much for the math!  I now know how to save myself a lot of time when I need to hit a specific width on some of my projects.   

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You are very welcome Bgs!  I also throw in a few extra chains when following a pattern says to chain more than 100-ish in case my attention is needed elsewhere for a moment in the middle of chaining, picking out chains is better than the aggravation of ending up 1 short, and I don't like to fudge if I don't have to.

BP, you are right I should have discussed how to hit gauge because this IS a garment, but I was focused on answering the OP's specific question on how to add stitches in pattern, and gave a tried and true answer that will work with a minimum of math calculations.  It's a more appropriate technique to enlarge a blanket or table runner than a garment, but I don't think this neck warmer would be unusable if it is off by a stitch repeat (which appears to be very short for this pattern).  I try to pay close attention to the question asked, in order to give a response that not only solves the immediate problem but also provides a skill that will help solve future issues.  

 

 

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20 minutes ago, Granny Square said:

You are very welcome Bgs!  I also throw in a few extra chains when following a pattern says to chain more than 100-ish in case my attention is needed elsewhere for a moment in the middle of chaining, picking out chains is better than the aggravation of ending up 1 short, and I don't like to fudge if I don't have to.

BP, you are right I should have discussed how to hit gauge because this IS a garment, but I was focused on answering the OP's specific question on how to add stitches in pattern, and gave a tried and true answer that will work with a minimum of math calculations.  It's a more appropriate technique to enlarge a blanket or table runner than a garment, but I don't think this neck warmer would be unusable if it is off by a stitch repeat (which appears to be very short for this pattern).  I try to pay close attention to the question asked, in order to give a response that not only solves the immediate problem but also provides a skill that will help solve future issues.  

 

 

GrannySquare, I so enjoy reading your posts!  You are a wealth of information and your posts are always well thought out.  As you've commented, we often post at almost the same time and frequently say pretty much the same thing.  However I think you usually say whatever it is more clearly and with more detail, and i have learned from you over the years we have known each other on here (and Ravelry).  

I hope everybody who posts on Crochetville realizes that there's a whole range of experience and opinions in the world of crocheting.  All the way from some of us "vintage" crocheters, to people who only decided to learn to crochet this morning.  We can all learn from each other.  Many questions will elicit a range of answers and the OP can then digest them all and use the parts of each that are useful.  If I answer a question, my answer isn't competing with other answers....they all form a sturdy fabric of options!  

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Granny Square I have been crocheting extra chains for some time now thanks to you. 

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