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Jonzjob

What shape the hooks?

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Hi ladies, at least I think that you are mostly ladies with not many of us blokes??? I am as thick as a brick on the subject of crocheting so please excuse the silly questions. As you may have seen, I have just joined the forum to try to find out some information on the most popular sizes and shapes of the hooks you use. I am a wood turner and have been asked to turn some hooks.

A question on the form of the hooks. If you look at the 'Intro' forum you will be able to see what I have done so far, but I am not sure if it is better to leave the actual hook shaft section round or to flatten the sides where the hook is formed. I hope that you can see what I mean ? Also, is the depth of the hook sufficient or does it need to be deeper ? 🤔

I have also been making the larger handled ones too as, to me, it is the more pleasing shape. It also fits my hand better than the parallel 'stick' shape. This is possibly because I have arthritis in my hands. I also make my pens with a shape that suits my situation too. I have seen that the shape is a personal thing and some prefer the parallel and some the larger with the tapered shaft. Would it be better for me to do a selection of both would you think?

Sorry for all the questions, but I did say 

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I also decided to have a little play and turn an 8mm hook with a captive ring on it. It should still be strong enough as the waist and the wood is beech.  part is 7mm

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Below are 2 tapered hooks in my collection, both US size "I" but 2 different brands, the metal one turned a bit in the scanner, but I think you can see the shape of the throat area which is a longer and more gradual slope than yours are.  

The throat of yours is more abrupt, I think it might be trickier to use.

Here is one of many discussions of Boye (tapered on 2 sides) versus Bates (in-line, basically a round tipped dowel with a slash cut into it) hooks, take a look at the throat of both, they both have a more gradual slope than yours.

 

Tapered Hooks Size I.jpg

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I see what you mean Granny S. I hadn't realised that there could be so much to a 'hook'! So there should be a more gentle transition from the shaft to the hook throat if I have read your link correctly.

If that's the case that shouldn't be a problem, I hope  🤨

I had a play in my workshop this morning and a near disaster! I was turning a hook with a Celtic knot in the handle. I had almost finished it and was starting to part of at the handle end and got a catch. That stopped the handle end and as the shaft was at the live, driving, end it twisted the last inch of the shaft! I had to cut it down and re-turn the end again. It just reduced the length and I took it down from 8mm to 6mm. So now I have a short one and I'm not sure if it will be too short at 5" long? I will post a photo when I have hard wax oiled it.

 

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Right, a more gentle transition is what I meant.  Sorry you had a scary sounding incident, I don't think I'd pick a hobby that involved spinning sharp blades!  :eek 

I just measured that blue one above (the shorter of the 2, but not by much), it is 5.5" long.  In your intro thread, I mentioned there are 2 major ways of holding a hook.  I have a pencil grip, and just grabbed that blue hook...I wouldn't have an issue with it being .5" shorter, my grip only involves about half the hook.  But someone with an overhand grip might find it a little odd.  I've even seen tiny hooks on keychains, but I can't quite imagine crocheting with one--I think they'd be handier for using in knitting to pull up dropped stitches, where you'd hold the hook in a different way (vertically).

 

 

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Thank you for both your time and your patience GS (quicker that Granny S 😇 ) Those tiny ones on the key ring  look more like lock picks? Not that I know what a pick lock is like you understand 🤫

I have done some more this morning, including the 'short' one. The photo below includes the short one and I have faired the transition in more on them to make it a bit more gentle. Would this be enough do you think?IMG_3818.thumb.JPG.c087aabaf0389212d0ed0d96cf8345ca.JPGIMG_3819.thumb.JPG.2cfbf51f77f9c361fd8a71022ace9524.JPG

The 2 yellow ones are a wood called Russian olive. A false olive with viscous spikes on it. The tree was in our garden when we lived in France and it died. Not a very friendly tree, but the horrible looking wood is beautiful inside. The dark one with the Celtic knot is black walnut with ash inserts. It has to be my favorite combination.

Thank you again for your help.

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I think these decorative designs would be pretty popular, they are eye-catching and quite unique.  Maybe the 5 inch hook would be perfect for someone, you never know, as no two people have exactly the same hands and exactly the same way of holding the hook.  

As far as the looks, I LOVE the captive ring one---that kind of thing always makes me think about how it could have been made, it seems like magic 😆

Also the ones with a lot of contrast in the colors, the walnut and ash one is so pretty! and the one in the middle that has the 3 lines around it.

You know what just popped into my head---an image of a stand made of the ash (or similar pale wood), with several of the walnut and ash hooks in it.  That would be really eye-catching!

Maybe I should add that I personally don't collect hooks and don't really have any wooden hooks at all, so I wouldn't be your target customer---All my hooks are pretty utilitarian.  But I do know that wooden hooks are popular, such as the Furls hooks and others.  

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Much more 'user friendly' and typical throat taper.  The grain and shading of the olive wood ones are fascinating! (made me think of picking out one's wand in Diagon Alley if you are familiar with Harry Potter world). 

Before I read your post I was admiring the colored accents and assumed they were painted on, but they're wood?!  Wow, now that's magic, very cool.

 

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23 hours ago, Granny Square said:

Below are 2 tapered hooks in my collection, both US size "I" but 2 different brands, 

 

Tapered Hooks Size I.jpg

Good morning, Granny Square!  What brand is the blue hook?  It looks like it's made of plastic, is that right?  I am thinking the I have seen one like that somewhere, maybe one I vaguely remember my mom having 50 years ago,which i might still have if only i could remember where it's stored 😂  But maybe I remember it because you've posted a pic of it before  !   

Oh I se we're posting together again!  :waving:

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Posted (edited)

Thank you ladies. It good to know that I'm at least going in the right direction.

Kathy, the captive ring is quite interesting and I have lost count on how many times I have told how it's done. I I have to turn the man part, then turn a ring and soak it for 24 hours or more until it's soft and pliable. Then I have to stretch it very carefully and pull it on to the main part. And when I'm telling this to folk at craft fairs I don't normally get past the soaking it bit because I can't keep a straight face 🙃 Sorry, I just couldn't resist it 😇 The real method is that I made a special tool to do it and it is all done in place. It is easier than iit looks, but the end product is really nice. 

Sorry to digress but still about captive rings. I did a Golden Anniversary for our French neighbours when we lived there. A plaque and 2 goblets with captive rings. I have also done them a few times for friends getting married. Lovely to do and always well received too.1387035560_ClaudeAdpresent.thumb.jpg.d2cb0f8d1cf3aa6dfcffbf9c5f8e11b8.jpg

But I digress. That's too easy when I start thinking of my turning?

One of the things I love about turning wood Granny S is that I never know just what I am getting until I stop the lathe. The shape, yes, but until it's stopped the grain and markings are hidden. I have been turning for 25 years now and it's still a lovely surprise!

It's not a dangerous pastime though unless you try to take liberties with the wood. But I always stand to one side when doing bowls or anything like that and the next time a bit of wood flies past me won't either be the first or last time 🤯 I just love turning wood into things.. If you would like to see some of them then have a glimps at my web site below.

Edited by Jonzjob

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Hi Magiccrochetfan, yes we did post at the same time but I had to run off before saying :hi .  I've stuck that circa 1970 blue plastic Boye hook (my very first hook!) in the scanner and posted it here before so that may be why it looks familiar, but it was to compare to a metal Bates inline hook I bought 'by mistake' back then, before I knew the difference between tapered & inline.  The sort of chiseled plastic shape seemed to emphasize the tapering more than the smoother metal Hero ones.

Jonzjob, you had me going with that soaking thing (I know wood is sometimes soaked to bend it but... :think ) Your work is lovely, is that woodburning?  (and you forgot the link to your website)

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Please excuse my so called sense of humour Granny S. I am not one to take life at all seriously, just ask SWMBO , poor lady?

Thank you for your comment on what I do. What ever else is is it ain't work to me. I don't look at our log pile and see a fire now.

At one of the craft fairs we were at a young lad came and said "mister, how did you know that bowl was in that bit of wood?" It bought me down to earth with a bump and now I can look at a bit of wood and think "I wonder?"

We now live close to the Westonbirt Arboretum, do a search on it. It's a wonderland for me. We have a membership there and go often, were there yesterday. I look at those wonderful pieces of creation and realise just how small we are!

Oh, the link to my site is in my signature.

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Ah! (on the website location).  This forum has software updates every so often, and somewhere along the line the signatures disappeared from posts, I didn't realize they were still on people's profiles.  There's some beautiful things on your site!  Works of art, really.  :gallery

I googled the arboretum, it's beautiful, and peaceful!

re: the little boy and the bowl, https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/michelangelo_386296

 

 

 

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We lived in France, near to Carcassonne, for 13 years and some of our friends there have called me an artist, but it was usually when I had a glass in my hand!

Not really sure if they talking about my wood 😟😕😟 I love Mikky's quote about the statue in the block of stone. I don't do the stone, but I do know it's in the wood.

I had forgotten to say that the wrens on the anniversary present above are pyrography. It's a lovely way to put a picture, symbol or greeting on to wood. Our last dog, a chocolate labrador called Celé was beautiful and I put her onto a nice beech platter I had done several years ago

The frame for her name is the natural grain of the wood and it was perfect for her1138520179_Celeplate1.thumb.jpg.489b633cd6238b79439027024f0a5879.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Wow!  "Mikky" was right, at least with that piece of wood and your pup's portrait/name frame.  Beautiful!

You are quite the night owl, I didn't realize until a couple of posts ago that you were in the UK (edit: I'd overlooked your introduction post).  Have a good evening, er, morning now!

Edited by Granny Square

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Oh my gosh! Your hooks are beautiful! I'm a Susan Bates person myself. I learned to crochet with the in-line hook and could never get use to the Boye style.  Recently I feel in LOVE with Brittany hooks. I hold my hook like a knife so the thumb grip is not important to me. The Brittany's are a longer hook with a shaft/shank of about 4" before the decorative top so it comes in handy for smaller Tunisian projects. From talking to other crocheters who prefer the Boye hooks they found that the pointed head and the tapered throat made it easier to get the yarn to the shaft. (Apologize if this was already covered but I didn't see it mentioned but the size of the shaft/shank is what determines the hook size).  Here is a picture of the Brittany hook compared to the Bates (both in-line) I saw the hook parts in my folder so I threw that in for good measures. LOL

 

 

thC7YWBNQ3.jpg

Brittany-Crochet-Hooks_42.jpg

Bates.jpg

hook parts.jpg

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I really had no idea just how diverse this subject could be! The Brittany hooks are beautiful and the hook throat is quite dramatic.

I had a couple of ideas about the ones I am doing and tried a couple of them. I wondered just what they would look like and think that they look quite dramatic? I used an ash and black walnut sandwich.

Well, you judge?

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And turned them into these

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IMG_3836.thumb.JPG.7bc67174f5ae797a1dfe5732744a3cf7.JPG

I was quite pleased with the results, although they didn't all behave !

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Posted (edited)

LOVE the stripe wood! I have never tried using a the style of your hook but interested in trying it. I have nerve damage in my right hand so sometimes I'm limited on the time that I can hold the hook, especially when using thread.  Another thought for you regarding wood hooks, it's recommended to wax the hooks depending on how often they are used, 1. to stop the wood from drying out and cracking. Yarn can really grab the moisture. 2. Keeping them waxed and polish helps the yarn slide on the wood and not drag.

The shaft (the throat is before the shaft. In-line hooks really don't have that much of a throat like the Boye style. Not trying to be a jerk but thought you would want to know. :) ) of the Brittany hooks being longer is great for a type of crochet called Tunisian because you keep the stitches on the hook similar to the way that knitting does so special hooks are needed for some projects. The total length of the Brittany is 7 1/4 inch with a  4 1/4  shaft

 

Edited by BPokorny

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Thank you BP. I have printed off that chart and will keep it in my workshop. I will try to steer clear of knitting needles as long and thin shafts can be a real pain!

All of the hooks are coated with something called hard wax oil. It dries very hard, hard and tough enough to be used on floors and a local café in Malmesbury has done their floor with it and I used it on our pine floors too. They are then done with a microcrystaline wax. That's tough too so they should be fine. Even then they can be waxed after that at any time. It isn't like a varnish, it soaks into the wood and on larger surfaces, if damaged, can just be repaired by applying more hard wax oil. Thank you for the info though. As I said earlier I am as thick as a brick about crochet 🙄

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After making gawd knows how many hooks now I decided to try something else the spinning lady at the craft fair mentioned, a drop spinning spindle.

A simple thing to turn, but the top 'hook' bit took some thinking because I didn't want to just screw a small cup hook thing in the top. Better all in wood I thought. Just working out what might work took longer than the turning. I had a nice piece of ash branch just the right size, and the result is below.

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I am sure that there must be some spinners here that will be able to tell me if I have this right. The only time I have seen drop spindles is at a distance or in pictures, so if you can tell me if the 'hook' on the top is OK any help would be great. The yarn goes in at the side, through 90º and out of the centre top

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Then my next trick, I hope, will be to try a Book Charkha. I got the plans yesterday after seeing one on line, and that was a challenge I couldn't resist!

Oh yes, I nearly forgot. A little earlier in this thread someone mentioned about the black rings on one of the hooks. There are 2 on the drop spindle. They are made very simply by making a small grove in the wood and using a steel wire, like a cheese wire, held against the groove while the wood is spinning and the friction literally burns the black line into the wood. Very effective and so simple that even I can get it right 😇

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Oh, that's where the black lines come from!  :idea   Such a simple thing for a beautiful effect.

I don't spin so can't comment on the end detail, but it looks pretty!  The grain is mesmerizing...

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The simple things are quite often so good. Shame about me though 🙃

Ash is said to be a very plain wood, but to me there is no such thing. Every piece is unique in every way. And ash has a very clear grain. If you look at the end grain it tells you where it came from. It was a small horizontal branch. A long-ish branch too. That is told because the underside was under compression and the year rings are closer. The top was stretched and the rings are wider. There's quite a difference so the branch must have had a fair amount of downward pressure at that point. If the rings are equal all round then the branch was vertical. Sorry, I'm ranting on a bit here.

 

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On 3/18/2020 at 11:55 AM, Jonzjob said:

Thank you BP. I have printed off that chart and will keep it in my workshop. I will try to steer clear of knitting needles as long and thin shafts can be a real pain!

All of the hooks are coated with something called hard wax oil. It dries very hard, hard and tough enough to be used on floors and a local café in Malmesbury has done their floor with it and I used it on our pine floors too. They are then done with a microcrystaline wax. That's tough too so they should be fine. Even then they can be waxed after that at any time. It isn't like a varnish, it soaks into the wood and on larger surfaces, if damaged, can just be repaired by applying more hard wax oil. Thank you for the info though. As I said earlier I am as thick as a brick about crochet 🙄

Great info for me about the floor wax that's not crochet related. I've been wanting to finish the wood floors in my home. My Husband sanded down the floor in my Daughters room a few years back and put poly over them. It turns out that the wood was so soft at has dents and wear in the high traffic areas and from her computer chair. Maybe the the floors were sealed in the hard wax oil that you mentioned. I'll mention it to my Husband. :)

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Well I guess I can help you again. LOL  I live in CT and Stitches United has one of their big events here. (Canceled this year :( ) So I take advantage of the classes taught by well Known Designers and Teachers. One of the classes I took was for Drop Spindle. oh my gosh; NOT my thing! lol But I did need to purchase a spindle. I'll find it and send you pictures of the hook part. :) 

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Posted (edited)

I found it!  I just want to make it clear that I don't know that much about drop spindle but when I took the class this brand was recommended to them and after they (The Shibaguyz) tried different types they like this one the best and sold them to us. I used my "yarn" ( I will not be making my own anytime soon LOL) to hide the name because I'm not sure if it's legal to show it. I took several so hopefully it will cover everything that you will need to see. The hook will make you so happy! :)  I put the crochet hook next to it to show the size.

 

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Edited by BPokorny

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