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luckygrrl

round and round we go [a question about in the round!]

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Hi everyone!

 

I am new to crocheting in the round, and have been doing not too bad at it so far. However, I haven't done enough of the different types to exactly get some things. I was hoping someone could help me with sort of a fundamental question I have. Hope I can explain this okay...

 

What would be the reason a pattern would call for A vs. B? I'm writing this out myself, not exactly from a pattern, so forgive me if I get something a little wrong...

 

A) At the end of the RND, join with SS to first stitch of last RND, ch 1. Do NOT turn.

 

B) At the end of the RND, join with SS to first stitch of last RND, ch 1, turn.

 

I've found that trying A means that I absolutely can never figure out where the start of my row was, so I'm assuming I should be using a stitch marker...but where, exactly? I've never used them-- would I put it in the first stitch of the row after I've done the stitch, and then it would indicate to me at the end of my row that it's the stitch I ss into to join? Using stitch markers scares me for some reason. lol

 

Anyway, what's the difference in why you'd use A or B? I'm not experienced enough to have any idea, and patterns will just say one or the other and not explain why. Is A the type that is considered working it in a spiral (where you end up with a little bump at the end instead of a smooth row)? Or would that be if you didn't ss to join and just kept on working your stitch around and around?

 

Part of the reason I'm asking is because I want to understand the concepts I'm working with (and haven't ever figured out how to successfully do A!), but also because I want to make striped arm warmers in the round and am not sure if I can only do B with changing colors in rows. Can you change row colors in either method?

 

I know I have about 80 bajillion other questions about working in the round but hopefully I can at least get this basic one figured out. Thanks in advance, I hope this question isn't too DUH. lol I want to conquer this and know what I'm doing, and WHY I'm doing it! :P

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When you keep going in the same direction (without turning), the right SIDE is always the right side and the back is the wrong side.

 

When you go back and forth (turning), each ROW is alternating right side and back side. It changes the pattern and look of the fabric in the long run.

 

Is that clear as mud? The simple explaination is, it changes the appearance.

 

Stitchinpick

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firstly working in the round to make granny squares one site i visited months ago suggested turning at the end of a round as it makes a better looking square. ch 1 is more difficult to find when you get round to ss into so i would put a safety pin piece of different coloured yarn in the slip stitch so you can find it when you complete the round. a spiral has no s/s so that is why we have to mark the start of each round. you can change colour whenever you want to. :hook hope this helps you :):hug

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When I use a stitch marker I put it on the last stitch of the row I was working on so I know where I ended up. Not sure why I do it that way or if thats the best way, but it seems to work. I'm thinking that as long as you do it the same way every time, it probably won't matter whether you put in in the first or last stitch.

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that is very true as long as it is in the same stitch but the ch1 is always hard to find. :hook

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yah. if you ch1 and turn it evens out both sides so technically there isnt a wrong/right side. depending on your pattern, whether it needs to be or not. i always put the stitch marker in the very 1st stitch. (say a ch3 for a beginning dc round). as long as you always put it in the same stitch i do not think it would matter. its just to help keep things sorted in your head. :P

 

 

good luck!

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I put my stitch marker in between the first and second stitch. I don't know why, but it works for me.

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Thanks for all the input! Huh, so it's really just a matter of right side/wrong side or all the right side? I had no idea. I assumed that there was more to it than that, and it turned out to be so simple. lol

 

Now, I just have to get the whole stitch marker thing down. Well, next time I encounter a pattern that needs it. ;P

 

One other question now that I know both are just stylistic differences in the way they look.... when would someone use the spiral version that doesn't ss to join but just continues along?

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One other question now that I know both are just stylistic differences in the way they look.... when would someone use the spiral version that doesn't ss to join but just continues along?

 

I am working on something that does that. The greatest patterns to read to me are the ones that in the begining will say: work in rounds unless ask to join or something to that effect they will ask you to mark the begining of the first round or the last stitch of the round then they will give you a count as to how many stitches you should have at the end of round. I leave all my markers there so I can count the stitches and the rounds rows. So it might say something like :

work evenly from row 5 to 9 at end of row 9 join with slip stitch chain 1 turn sc in next stitch and I will mark that stitch and make sure I have what ever amount it calls for hopefully the pattern will say. They don't all say they are all written different some just asume your a pro I am not so the more info in a pattern that will help me tell where Im at and if Im in the right place with the right amount.

I just use different peices of color yarn to mark everything. Im still learning everyday for sure.

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Usually, you would use a spiral for anything where you don't want a seam, like for a hat or stuffed animals. When you ss at the end of a round to join, you sometimes end up with a noticeable seam.

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Nay, anytime I ss to join I always end up with a seam. I envy people who have pristine work... I'm just not that delicate yet. ;)

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