Jump to content
  • 0
rogue_ish

Identify this stitch please?

Question

Knit.PNG.8567bddbe6d31c2017b2ec5abc55e1d9.PNG

 

Can anyone identify for me please the NAME of this stitch pattern?  It's a webbing pattern used in a net.  Many thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

13 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

I don't believe it's crochet.  I knit, and the front part of it resembles stockinette (which is fabric with all knit stitches facing front), but extraordinarily loose.  The back of stockinette is 'purl bumps', but those threads in the back don't look quite right.

The pic should be in the orientation below IMO, guessing this is the way it would have been made.  Knit stitches look like upside down U's linked together.  Here is a blog page with probably TMI on what a knit stitch looks like so you can see what I mean that the part in front looks like knit but not the back.   https://techknitting.blogspot.com/2006/11/what-knitting-is.html

Not very helpful, sorry.  I'm guessing it may not be hand made.

If you want to crochet fabric that sort of resembles this but not exactly, slip stitch crochet with a very overlarge hook would come close-ish.   Plain slip stitches look like sideways knit stitches.  http://new.slipstitchcrochet.com/

unknown stitch.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Thanks Granny Square!  Yes, I think it's machine made.  It's nylon.  Is there a database anywhere of stitch types?  Do textile manufacturer's keep such information anywhere?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I don't know of any manufacturing databases, just hand crafting knit and crochet stitch sites. 

I can't imagine why something like this would be online, having worked in the materials side of a manufacturing company, they tend to want to keep their process and design info proprietary.  And (as I understand it, tho I may be wrong)  knitting machines can do stitches beyond what humans can.  And even if they did publish something, it wouldn't be 'cast on 1000, knit 1 purl 2' sort of thing, it would be programming code instructions for an industrial knitting machine.

What is your goal, to replicate the stitch by hand in some way? This site has a bunch of stitches, knit and crochet - click on 'stitchionary' and choose knit or crochet, and probably the 'lace' category is where you'll find openwork patterns that might be somewhat similar.  Keep in mind that you'd have to imagine the stitches made with a hook or needle way bigger than the ones shown in the sample photos to get the same look as your sample.

 

Edited by Granny Square

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Purpose is actually a part of a science/forensics project. The netting was part of a downed aircraft from the 1940s and it was used in the manufacture of some wing parts.  We are trying to identify the stitch pattern as part of the final forensics report.  Other research suggest it is a form of "warp knitting".  The old manufacturing databases from that time are just not available online, so I thought who better than the knitting/crochet community to know the details & history of "knot theory".  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knot_theory

Thanks a ton for your help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 1/11/2020 at 12:54 PM, Granny Square said:

This one looks a bit like your sample.  Or this  

those are very interesting!  I like the look of the first one especially!  but knit mesh and i do not get along at all, I cannot keep correct st count.  (makes me appreciate how easy mesh is in crochet 😉 )  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
2 hours ago, rogue_ish said:

 I thought who better than the knitting/crochet community

The thing is, this site is primarily about crocheting which produces different fabric than knitting.  And commercial machine knitting is very different than hand knitting. 

My local library used to have a book on commercial machine knitting but apparently doesn't any longer and I can't remember the name of it.  it had a lot of photos of different fabrics that can be knit on these machines which are completely unlike home knitting machines or hand knitting.    I was amazed at some of these materials, I had never seen anything that looked like them. 

Maybe a college that has textile courses would have some library resources to help you narrow it down more.  Or search online for warp knitting, maybe you'll find an image like yours.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Much appreciated Kathy and others for the ideas.  That I found a book with the actual webbing in it was a real find and exciting. But finding the manufacturer of something that was, at the time, commercial and limited, has been  difficult!  But I will soldier on!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

If you're trying to find the mfr, maybe approach it thru the aircraft?  There are highly organized groups that research and even restore ww2 planes and the like.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Yes-- that's the issue.  We are trying to IDENTIFY the aircraft...  we don't know the model or make, hence trying to put things together from just a few broken pieces in an old crash.  But that's a good idea-- some of them might know these pieces so we should go there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Ah, I see.  that is quite a puzzle!   Well, could be that some plane enthusiast groups might have ideas.  I know my husband can identify certain cars just from a piece of a tail light..... 😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Rogue-ish, that sounds like a fascinating project!  My Grandpa was a barnstormer and later owned a small airport, and my Dad was an FAA pilot, but neither are around any more to ask about possible resources, tho, sorry.   The only 'group' I can think of is the Experimental Aircraft Assn., which I think is partly about restoring old planes as well as modifying them--not sure if that is worth a shot, not that a hobbyist member could identify your fabric but they might be able to suggest other resources to try.

Magic, I agree, actually the closest I've done to mesh in knitting is drop stitch (which is kinda fun), but some knit stitches (like bobbles - are you kidding??) are so much easier in crochet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...