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Kayla Jackson

Useful but ugly crochet bag

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 I have a crochet bag I got from my grandma that’s fairly ugly, but I like to use it to hold my current project lol. I think it’s from the 70s or 80s and the fabric is what makes it look ugly. Anyone have any ideas about how to make it look less ugly? I don’t sew, and Pinterest is no help...

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Edited by Kayla Jackson

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I love it. I would leave it the way it is just because it was grandma's. 

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I agree with TATS!!  Unless it is full of holes (and it looks like it's in pretty good shape!), just enjoy it!

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I have one identical to this except the fabric is more like old fashioned calico  (mine is probably circa 1980).  

I have seen patterns online to make this from scratch, even if you don't have a sewing machine you could probably sew a replacement by hand.  But I agree with Tats, simple geometric design, the colors are muted not garish...as long as it isn't damaged, I'd leave it.

Edited by Granny Square

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My Mom use to have one like that.  I agree, unless it is falling apart, I would leave it alone.  To me it really isn't that ugly.

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I would be leery about crocheting or knitting one completely; in other words, I think you'd have to cover the existing item rather than ditching the fabric.  I think it really needs non-stretchy fabric to work (stand up) properly.  Notice if you look at how it works, not counting the inside lining it has 2 bottoms which are sewn together at the front and back long sides to make a non-stretchy tube; this controls how far it opens, and I wouldn't mess with that.  

You could sort-of replicate the knit cable pattern in crochet without too much trouble; find a crochet pattern with some cables that appeal to you, and 'borrow' them for your cover.  Would just take some swatching and measuring to get it to fit, and hand-sew it to the fabric.

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Wow that is really pretty.  I love the cables.  If you want you could always reinforce it with material.  Unless you are carrying it around, it would be good, because it will stretch.

I have it on my wish list now, except I do not have the wooden part, but if I did, I would make this.

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Financially, the container in it's current condition, is worth more like it is. Take care of it and use it. Don't refinish the wood, either (if that's possible.) Antique items that are cleaned, sanded, changed in any way are devalued. I have the small wooden thread box with a curve top handle and two doors that open to reveal the inner space. I stripped it when I was young, before I found out I should not have. Your yarn carrier is great and it would probably have quite a few stories to tell about all the yarn things that were made by your grandmother.

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Just had a brainstorm about the project carrier. Make a bag of fabric you like, big enough to slip the current bag on the framework into it. Make the flaps long enough to button, snap or tie at either side of the tiny bar. And the original stays intact. Since you don't sew,  you could use that iron on stuff that you put on a skirt to make a hem. Hand sew ribbon at the four corners to hold the bag on. The piece you cut for the bag needs about a half inch or more for "seams". Turn wrong side out and pin together to see if it fits. It's like a paper grocery bag with flaps on the two larger sides.

Edited by Gael Golden

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On 12/8/2019 at 6:24 AM, Gael Golden said:

Just had a brainstorm about the project carrier. Make a bag of fabric you like, big enough to slip the current bag on the framework into it. Make the flaps long enough to button, snap or tie at either side of the tiny bar. And the original stays intact. Since you don't sew,  you could use that iron on stuff that you put on a skirt to make a hem. Hand sew ribbon at the four corners to hold the bag on. The piece you cut for the bag needs about a half inch or more for "seams". Turn wrong side out and pin together to see if it fits. It's like a paper grocery bag with flaps on the two larger sides.

I have to say, I like your fabric. And Gael Golden has a great idea. However, maybe consider crocheting a cover for it since you don't sew. 

I too have a similar yarn basket that I bought about 1984. Plain but, very useful for my projects. I've had to glue where the dowels are inserted from all the moving around from room to room through the years, but all in all, has held up pretty well through the years. Funny, when I picked it up just now, I found a small hammer I kept in my studio/office that I thought I lost when we moved. Yay me!

 

Yarn Bag.jpg

Edited by ReniC

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I can't see a way to just cover it in the sense that every bit of the original will never show, and have it continue to be functional.  

I am looking at my bag right now.  You could very easily make a 'skirt' that would more or less be a tube to cover what shows when it is open, but will look goofy when you close it.  The tube would have to have 'slits' at the top and bottom corners--at the top end that are long enough to fold over and 'around' the wooden bar between the handles and hand sew on (thru the fabric), and at the short sides fold over and sew to the short fabric sides.  I'd use sewing thread to do this, in case it doesn't work and you have to remove it it will do less damage to the original bag than sewing on with yarn.

Also slits at the bottom, you could  just let the slits fall on either side of the wooden bars.

Easiest way to make the tube I'd think would be 4 rectangles, 2 big 'front and back' ones and 2 skinny side ones (under where the wooden legs cross), and seam together but not all the way to the ends, to create the slits.

When you close it, the the fabric will show - that '2 bottoms' thing that I described above will poke out below the skirt, because the legs will push the fabric down lower than the bottom wooden cross pieces when it's closed.   See, in the top 2 photos of your first post, there is a horizontal line of stitching (on my bag it's about 3.75" from the bottom)?  The fabric below that line of stitching, more or less, will show when it is shut.

 

Edited by Granny Square

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By the way, random tip, since you don't have a 'stitch count' pattern to wing your crochet version:  You can crochet a chain longer than you think you need, turn and crochet back toward the knot to the distance you need, and pick out the extra chains and weave the end in later.  It will not unravel from the beginning end.

Edited by Granny Square

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