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Gaylala13

Pattern to diagram

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I asked this in my introduction submission and was told this is a good place to ask.  

Hi, I was taught ONE stitch 20+ years ago and decided with the internet, I can learn more and get back into it.  I have already taught myself so much, but teaching myself to read patterns is not very easy.  I can read diagrams pretty well though. I want to make some really nice blankets for Christmas presents. I have found a pattern I really like, and it probably really super simple, but I just can't figure it out. I have tried diagramming it out on graph paper and I can't get things to line up correctly. I think I am just a very visual person and I need to see that diagram. I reached out to the person whose website I found the pattern on and asked if it was available in a diagram, but the reply was that the pattern is free on her website. So... I am now searching for a seasoned crocheter to help me diagram this simple pattern for me. I am a total beginner and I think this is a REALLY simple pattern that only consists of SC, CH, some skips and bobbles. It's the counting part I need help with.  

This is the link to the pattern. https://daisyfarmcrafts.com/crochet-mesh-and-bobble-blanket/ 

I really just need help with row 1, 2 and 7.  Once I get those, the rest is just a repeat those rows where needed.

Edited by Gaylala13

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Hello again.  That pattern has such a soothing color scheme :) 

First - you are a beginner.  I am going to assume that you know about turning chains, and how they do, or don't, count as a stitch -- correct?  In SC the turning chain is 1 chain and they typically don't count, in HDC they may or may not count and will either be 1 or 2 chains (it's a weird stitch, the pattern will usually say, but probably a 1 chain turn is not a stitch, treated like SC), in DC the turning chain is 3 and normally count as a stitch.  When turning chains count as a stitch, you need to stitch into the top chain of the turning chain at the end of the following row.  For HDC, the pattern will usually tell you if the turning ch counts as a stitch, for SC the pattern will assume you know is is NOT a stitch, and for DC it will assume you know it IS; if the pattern treats the turning chain differently it will say so.

It's very common for beginners to end up with ever narrowing pieces because they miss using turning chain as a stitch, when you are supposed to.  

OK, it starts out with an even # of chains, which means the first row will have an odd number of stitches (because the first foundation chain is skipped).  Because this is a sc based pattern for this and a few more  rows, the turning chain is NOT a stitch.  Even so, it might be a good idea, as a beginner and because you are having trouble keeping count, to put a stitch marker in to the first stitch at each end, and move it up each row.  I like to use bobby pins - they are much cheaper than purchased markers, and stay put fairly well.

Pattern says to start with 98 chains.  A trick - count to 98, and add a few more (not a lot, just a couple).  Reason:  I'm sure you can count, and so can I, but sometimes I get distracted and end up with 97 for example and am really irritated to be 1 short after I turn and work back.  When it's over 100 or so chains, I count but add a few more 'in case'.  You can pick the chains out later, it won't unravel (without effort) from the knot end direction, only from the last stitch made direction. 

First thru sixth rows are the same, sc, ch1, skip the next chain or sc, repeat.  Do these come out OK?  I'm assuming so, it's sc into sc, chain over chain so pretty simple. you really can't lose count (I hope? the pattern should be easy to see if you goof). There's not not much to diagram, xoxoxox where o are chains and x is SC.  

I have a tiny issue with the nomenclature in the next part.  She is using the wrong stitch description, although explains what she 'means' by her misstatement.  DC3tog is a decrease, combining 3 stitches into 1 (is worked over 3 stitches, but you end up with only 1 stitch 'top' at the end, and would count as 1 stitch when you come across it in the next row).  3 DC into 1 stitch is either a shell (if the 3 stitches are not joined together at the last step) or a cluster (if the 3 stitches are joined together at the last step).   So a cluster and decrease has a shared element of joining stitches at the top, but the big difference is the # of stitches used up in the process.  What she is calling a 3DCTOG cluster is normally called a 3DC cluster.  Rant over.

Row 7--you are putting a lot more stitches into this row than the previous ones. First I wondered why it doesn't buckle;  BUT, the 'extra' stitches are chains, which probably end up more vertical than horizontal, since they're between short SCs and taller clusters, so maybe not (the photo looks nice and flat).  Basically, count-wise, it's sc in each sc, and ch, cluster, ch in each chain space - so again, hard to get lost as the pattern is simple and 'almost' the same as the first 6 rows, except instead of xoxoxox the chains are replaced by chain-cluster-chain.  Again, hopefully the way I'm explaining it will help you not get lost, but it is pretty straightforward and should be easy-ish to see an error, as in the first section.

Row 8-- *SC in first SC, CH 1, SC into top of bobble stitch, CH 1*  Again, more of almost-the-same.  Everything so far, and beyond, is all sc in sc, "something", repeat.  Beyond this point the same rows above repeat.

A famous knitting book author once advised to admire your work frequently; this applies to crochet as well, because that's how you spot errors before you have passed them by too many rows.  Your pattern is particularly consistent, in that every row is SC - something - SC, except for row 8 and it's repeats.  You should be able to spot the SCs lining up nicely over either other SCs or bobbles, and if they don't, something is off.

I hope that helps to organize the words into an easy to visualize pattern.  If not - I need to log off soon, but since you are familiar with diagrams, you should be able to diagram this yourself.  You don't need to plot out all 97 stitches, just the start, a couple of repeats of SC - something - SC.  I noticed she didn't mention this after row 2, but all rows would end in SC, and the turning chain of 1 except the last row (no turning chain).

If you are still stuck tomorrow, I'll help with a mini diagram tomorrow, but I'll bet you can do this yourself.  The 'hardest' part is to write the first row's stitches right to left (so, writing backwards) and the second row left to right (reading backwards), and so on.  

 

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I think you just made me understand it so much better. I am going to sit down and give it a go. I agree, the colors are very soothing. I think this will be a great first big project.  I will have to post a picture when done!

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