Jump to content
  • 0
Sign in to follow this  
CrochetRenee14

Increasing in the round for flared and flowing skirt

Question

Hello, what is the increase rule to accomplish a skirt that is flared and flowing? Do I increase evenly all the way around? For example inc dc2tog (1 stitch) Every ten stitches

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

I guess that depends on how much flare and flow.  BTW DC2TOG combines 2 stitches into 1 and is a decrease, I think you meant 2DC in 1 stitch.

The recipe for a flat circle in DC is to add 12 stitches each round, evenly spaced.  A true circle skirt is probably more ruffly than you want, but that gives you a starting point.

This won't demonstrate the drape of a flat circle, but you could grab some scrap paper and draw around a round saucer if you don't have a compass, and cut it out.  Fold the circle in quarters, and cut out a bit of the center for a 'waistline' opening.  Unfold it, and cut a slit up one of the fold lines, and form the circle into a cone until it looks about what you think the shape should be.  Mark the overlap line, flatten it out and estimate the % of the total the removed (overlap) part and therefore the % of stitches to take away from 12 increases per round (example, if you want to take away one quarter of the total, one quarter of 12 is 3 stitches so you'd want to increase by 9 each round not 12).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 8/13/2019 at 8:40 PM, CrochetRenee14 said:

Hello, what is the increase rule to accomplish a skirt that is flared and flowing? Do I increase evenly all the way around? For example inc dc2tog (1 stitch) Every ten stitches

I just found a pattern I used some years back that I bought then altered as I used perle 5 cotton thread.  It makes a lovely skirt in a clever design that I have used in making hats too.  Using simple sts up and down the row.    Take a look.  https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/gallivant

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Cute pattern, and good point on yarn/thread weight; the pattern links calls for fingering, anything much heavier won't be 'flared and flowing'.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...