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I’m making a blanket with 178 fountain chain and I want to do half double crochet stitch. Could I do single crochet stitch then the half double crochet stitch from Melissa 

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Plus every time I try to do a single crochet stitch under both loops it twists what am I doing wrong 

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Are you asking if you can do a row of sc in the foundation chains and then work hdc for the subsequent rows?  Yes you can.  Its pretty much up to you.  Do what is pleasing and works for you.  As for the twisted single crochets a photo might help us figure it out.  What comes to my mind is reverse single crochet or crab stitch which is sort of a challenge for me to do.  Or is the whole piece curling or twisting?  It usually lays flatter after a few rows.  Its easy to make the foundation chains too tight so it helps to make the foundation chains using the next size bigger hook than you plan on using for the rest of your project.

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19 hours ago, bgs said:

Are you asking if you can do a row of sc in the foundation chains and then work hdc for the subsequent rows?  Yes you can.  Its pretty much up to you.  Do what is pleasing and works for you.  As for the twisted single crochets a photo might help us figure it out.  What comes to my mind is reverse single crochet or crab stitch which is sort of a challenge for me to do.  Or is the whole piece curling or twisting?  It usually lays flatter after a few rows.  Its easy to make the foundation chains too tight so it helps to make the foundation chains using the next size bigger hook than you plan on using for the rest of your project.

I just wanted to say that I just loved your reply to bgs. So kind and helpful.

 

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Thank you every one . So when I start the single crochet stitch should I go to the second chain for the third one since then I’m doing hdc from Melissa ps here is a picture of it twisting 

image.jpg

Edited by mdkb904
I had a question

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There are 3 (practical) ways to work the first row of stitches into a foundation chain.

I'll start with the way I learned; I've tried the other ways and came back to 'my' way as IMO it's superior to the other ways, but that's ME.  Just giving you my slant, I think my preferred way is the easiest and fastest for a beginner to get off and running; try the other methods when you have a few projects under your belt and see which you prefer.

Your photo shows the chain side facing.  My preferred way to work into a chain is to insert the hook under the top 1 loop of the chain, from the point of view of this photo.  Reason (besides decades of habit): it does not pull the fabric tight, and gives you 2 unused loops (sort of a twisted chain) underneath to work into, if you want to add an edging for example.  I was amused to find this method taught in crochet manuals from the 1840s; I would recommend this method  to a beginner because beyond the other reasons I gave it is the easiest to learn and least fiddly IMO, and works with any pattern that starts with a chain.

Second way, with the chain facing the same way, is to insert the hook under the top loop AND the loop in the back of the chain (AKA  the 'back bump').  This leaves 1 free loop and also doesn't pull the fabric as tight.  This method, probably because I don't use it, it a teensy bit fiddlier, but not a lot.  

Third way is  with the back side of the chain facing 'up', and work into the single loop of the back bump.  Advantage:  it leave the chain edge at the bottom which looks nice.  Disadvantage:  it pulls the fabric tight and is the 'fiddlyest' and slowest method; usually you'd have to start with a bigger hook for just the chain to get it loose enough to work into, then switch to the 'correct' hook size for the rest of the project.  I would not recommend this method to a beginner.

The method of working into a chain that  DOESN'T work (EXTREMELY fiddly) is what you may be trying to do, from your photo.  You don't want to work into a chain the same way as you work into an established row of stitches, which is sort of working the third way I described above, but upside down (so the back bump is the unused loop, at the bottom).  I've tried this as an experiment and more or less ran away screaming after just a couple of stitches.  Try what I described as my preferred way, much easier and faster.

 

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What I meant by inserting the hook under the top 1 loop of the chain.  If this wasn't a chain, but the chain-looking tops of a prior row of non-chain stitches, this would be called 'working into the back loop'.  

top loop.jpg

Edited by Granny Square

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Crafter's choice, you can mix and match as you please.

One thing to keep in mind for crochet--the back of a stitch looks different than the front, so when you turn your work (like for a blanket), the odd rows are the fronts (from the point of view of the very first row, row 1 is an odd number) and the even rows are the backs.  The backs aren't necessarily the 'wrong' side, they don't look 'bad' just different.  

So, if you make 1 row of sc, and 1 row of hdc, one side of the blanket will show sc fronts and hdc backs, the other side will show sc backs and hdc fronts - back and front will look different.  Not a bad thing, just to be aware of.  

But if you make 2 rows of sc, and 2 rows of hdc, (or also higher numbers of the same stitch in stripes) the front and back of the blanket will look almost the same.

None of these choices is wrong, just giving you a little something to think about when you make your choice.

 

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