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loriko

help to figure how much more yarn

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Hi everyone!  I so appreciate this site and the help that returns with it.  If I haven't told those of you thank you in the past for your help, I hope you are reading this and know that I appreciate it.  So, I am still learning and need help on figuring how much more yarn I need to buy.  I am doing a c2c, 2 ch and 3 dc pattern.  I am using a skein of yarn that starts at 7 oz.  I have weighed the remainder of the yarn left and I have 1.06 oz.  I have done 32 of 75 days worth, (there are 25 blocks that make up a day).  Could you give me a math equation to help figure out how many skeins of yarn i will need to do the 75 days.  I hope this is making sense.  I have only one skein for that day and I know that I will at least need 2 if not 3, but I am hoping to find an equation so I can figure it out on my own for the future.  Thank you everyone, got to run!  Bye!

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This would be calculable on a non-temperature blanket with a planned color scheme worked any other way but on the bias.  You could work a couple of rows, rip it out, and measure the yardage for that number of rows, and extrapolate the yardage needed for however many rows you have left.  

But, you don't know the color distribution you need, and each row C2Cis a different length.  

Measuring yards, not weight, is the most accurate way to do this.  Different colors, even of a same brand and dye lot, may vary a bit in yards per ounce, and if you are mixing brands there's even more variation -- each yarn class ('weight', like worsted, sport, sock, etc.) is a range of actual weights and thicknesses, not an absolute.  And if you did go by ounce, you'd still have to swatch, rip, measure length or cut and weigh.  There's no absolute of 'x ounces covers y square inches for z stitch' - too many variables in yarn and individual stitch tension.. 

Not a good idea for 99% of projects, but since this will be an irregular stripe pattern you might be just as well off buying more skeins as you go for this blanket (same brand for each color*, but chancing different dye lots).  If you have a long stretch of the same temp range when you are near the end of a skein--a knitting trick I've read about (but haven't tried) is to cut in a different dye lot for the same color is to alternate rows from one dye lot to the other for a few rows.  Subtle stripes for a few rows might look better than one abrupt line.

* edit, meaning not every color needs to be the same brand as every other color, but if you ran out of light blue you'd want to replace it with the same brand, but possibly different dye lot of  the same shade of light blue for example.

 

 

Edited by Granny Square

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Thank you so much for responding.  Another thing learned.  I was asking regarding ounces because I had read somewhere how they did that using a kitchen scale.  What you all said makes perfect sense and the yardage would be a more for sure thing.  The more i work and read, the more things sink in.  Thanks again for your help.

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The ounces thing would work reasonably well on something simpler - example, a (not bias) rectangular 1 color blanket that will be 4x6', you're working across the 4' side and have made  2' so far and have used 5 ounces.  So 1/3 of the total is 5 ounces, so you need twice that to finish so another 10 ounces.  Or with not that much more math, say the blanket is even stripes of multiple colors of the same yarn type and brand repeating for example.

Your blanket just has too many variables going on I'm afraid. 

Also trying to gently steer you away from the scale-weight thing because I've seen on other forums where people have tried to use it in ways that don't make sense, like wondering why they ran short using the same scale-weight of heavy, dense cotton for a pattern they previously worked up in fluffy light something-else of the same wraps-per-inch yarn class.  I know that you weren't going there, but the same yardage of same wpi class stuff will always be the right answer.

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