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Well, posting that much of a pattern on this forum would be a violation of copyright and this forum's rules, but I'll try to help.  Also, 'the first 12 rows' is really the WHOLE pattern. 

I'm not sure if you meant by 'post' , to post a video, but that would be against the rules as well.  This pattern has a stitch diagram, if you scroll own; it's really helpful if you learn how to read these, they can answer a lot of questions.  The plus signs are SC, the ovals are chains, the things that look like a V with crossed lines shows 2 SC into 1 stitch.

I'll try to pick out the pieces that might be confusing, and gets asked often by other new crocheters...

The project has 3 colors, A, B, and C.  At the beginning, where it says CA, it means color A.  Further down, below the stitch diagram, there is a list of which rows are to be color A, B, and C.

Where you see something inside brackets, for example [1 sc, ch 1, 1 sc], it means to do all the things in the bracket, in 1 stitch.  

At the end of the row, after the stitch instructions, it gives you a count of the stitches in that row; example row 1 ends with " -- 3 sc".  That's a summary just to help you make sure that you didn't miss something; if your stitch count is different you'll need to figure out where you went wrong.

An asterisk * indicates you are to repeat a set of instructions.  It first appears in row 5, and tells you how many times to repeat it.

Here is a helpful site that may help you to read patterns.  On the menu on the right side, look at "crochet patterns- how to read" and "crochet chart symbols"  (lots of other good stuff there, too) https://www.craftyarncouncil.com/standards.html

 

 

 

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Thanks for the info and taking the time to explain.  I thought because the pattern was free and had been posted by the owner that it wouldn't be a problem with the copyright issue.   It's clear now.    I guess what I meant to say is I can read the pattern but I'm apparently not good at actually applying what it says.  I think I'm doing it well, but it doesn't look ok. 

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Hi, I don't know if you saw my post in your other thread, but I suggested that you post a photo of your piece.  We can try to help you figure out what is going wrong.  

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Welcome to Crochetville! 

We understand that you're feeling frustrated. We've all been there.

Is there a particular row where it starts to look wrong? Sometimes it's the stitch count that's off. Are you counting your stitches at the end of every row? If your count doesn't match the count in the pattern, it will look wrong.

As Kathy suggested, a picture(s) would help us to see what might be wrong. The closer, the better. We're good at figuring out what's wrong, but we can't do it without seeing or knowing the details of what's confusing. With seeing it, we can pinpoint a possible problem, instead of guessing. 

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Hi Magiccrochetfan,

Thanks for your patience! 

This is what I've done so far.  Working with larger yarn at the moment until I figure out the pattern.   Thanks in advance for help. 

collage-2017-11-19.jpg

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I think I see which concepts you're missing. 

Each pattern instruction ends with - # stitch. For example, "- 3 sc". This is the stitch count. It is information, rather than an action. It means count your stitches that you made and make sure they match the stitch count. It does NOT mean make more stitches. So for row 1, make 3 sc. Stop. Count. Turn. 

At the end of every row, turn your work over. The last stitch in the previous row becomes the first stitch on the next row. It helps to put a stitch marker in one of the 3 sc stitches you do in row 1. Then even rows have the stitch marker on the back. Odd rows have the stitch marker on the front, facing you.

When something is in () it means to do everything in one stitch. At the end of row 1, there's 3 stitches. TURN.

Row 2 ...

Prior to going into stitches: ch2, which acts like an sc and a ch1.

Stitch 1: sc, ch1, sc all in the top of the first sc.

Stitch 2: ch1 and don't stitch into the stitch by skipping it

Stitch 3: sc

TURN 

Those chains that you made in row 2 have a space underneath. It's called a chain space, aka ch sp, aka ch-# sp where # is the number of chains. To crochet in a ch sp, insert your hook under the chain, instead of in the top of a stitch. 

At the end of row 2, you have 3 chain spaces. 2 of them are ch-1 spaces and 1 is a ch-2 space. All of your row 3 stitches are done in the chain spaces. You skip each row 2's sc stitches by doing a ch1 over them.

Row 3...

Prior to stitching: ch2

Ch-1 space: sc, ch1

Ch-1 space: sc, ch1

Ch-2 space: sc

TURN

Recap: The number at the end of each row is a stitch count. Turn at the end of each row. Parentheses mean do everything in the () in one stitch. Ch-# sp means work in the chain space. Count your stitches at the end of EVERY row to make sure they match the pattern's stitch count. 

I hope this helps! 

Edited by redrosesdz

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I just tried a little swatch, thru row 3.  It occurs to me that this might be easier to keep track of where you are (at least for the first few rows) if you put a marker in the chain spaces.  I think you are on the right track...

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