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Well it has taken a lot of You Tube and a lot of starting and stopping but I got to do a magic ring, crochet 6 stitches and closed the ring ok!

What I would like to know is that my pattern says crochet 2dc in each stitch. I find this really difficult, I cant seem to find the stitch again (maybe it's too tight?).

Is it really necessary to crochet in dc as I find, at the moment I can manage single easier!!

I am just working on a test  piece before I start the actual toy.

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What do you mean by "I can manage single easier"?

When you're crocheting in the round, there's a formula for keeping it flat. Then when you want it to curl, you slow down increasing and eventually stop increasing. (Increase, aka inc, is 2 stitches into the same stitch.)

For UK dc (US sc) the formula is...

Rnd 1: 6 dc stitches in a ring

Rnd 2: 2dc in each stitch around (12)

Rnd 3: 2dc, dc around (18)

Rnd 4: 2dc, dc, dc around  (24)

Rnd 5: 2dc, dc, dc, dc around (30)

Etc.

You add 6 stitches to each round, because the diameter is growing. 

So, yes, you need to find the tops (looks like <). Crochet 2 stitches into each one. If you can't insert your hook into the tops, then you're crocheting too tight.  Either loosen your stitches or use a bigger hook. 

Make sure that when you crochet, you're using the shaft of the hook to make the stitch. The skinny part under the hook is called the throat. The shaft is between the throat and the thumb rest.

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As Redrosesdz pointed out, there's a difference between US and UK terms.  It's unusual for a toy to be made in US DC, because it is taller and gappier, so the stuffing wouldn't be as hidden as it would in US SC (UK DC).

Also, if you really are to be using US DC...if you are just starting a new row, or a round not in a spiral, or from a magic or adjustable ring, you need to use a 'turning chain' to bring your yarn up to the height of a row.  For US SC, it's 1 chain (does not count as a stitch), for US DC, it's 3 chains (counts as a stitch).  I'm mentioning all this because it would be difficult to make the very first US DC in a row or round if you didn't do the turning chain first...you'd end up with sort of a knot.  The next stitch would be a little easier, though, because you'd be starting closer to the right height.

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Ah, wasn't sure...and now re-reading I see I focused on the third paragraph, and overlooked that increases were the problem.  Oops!  Gotta quit skimming!   Knittingnan, sorry for straying from your question. 

A lot of beginners do crochet tightly, including me at first long ago.  I found I was forming the stitches too close to the throat of the hook, not back on the shaft where the stitch size is, well, supposed to be sized.  There are some shell stitch patterns where you put 9 or more stitches into 1, so it can be done!  It just takes practice.  Relax....And yes, you're going to have to increase and decrease if you're making toys ;)  

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Yes you might be crocheting way too tight. But you need to remember that amigurumi need to be crochet tight. Because if the stitches are loose that fiber fill -stuffing will be showing up between those stitches. And that will not look very nice. I crochet a lot of amigurumi and crochet them very tight. For instance when I am using worsted weight yarn-WW, I use much smaller hook-2,75mm and sc stitches.. Usually dc stitches with amigurumi dos not work very well. Because of those longer posts. If you will stuff that, those spaces between dc will open up a little and that stuffing will show up:(. I always use sc for my amigurumi. I am talking only about those parts that need to be stuffed.

Krys 

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